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mahlerfan
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WAYLT

Post by mahlerfan » Fri Mar 25, 2005 10:40 am

What are you listening to?

I'm listening to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik performed by the Talich Quartet. Followed by more fun divertimenti, great for starting the day. I know, a late start for me! :)
Last edited by mahlerfan on Fri Mar 25, 2005 10:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:06 pm

My neighbor's front-end loader moving his mound of gravel for the umpteenth time.

It's a new composition by Glass . . .

jbuck919
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Post by jbuck919 » Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:16 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:My neighbor's front-end loader moving his mound of gravel for the umpteenth time.

It's a new composition by Glass . . .
My turn: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

WiganAthletic
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Post by WiganAthletic » Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:23 pm

Beethoven's Quartets / Talich.

Boy am I glad I sold that Berg set. These guys play "shaken not stirred" music, delicate, thought provoking togetherness.

Especially keen on the six opus 18 quartets, deft performances.

10/10 :D

mahlerfan
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Post by mahlerfan » Fri Mar 25, 2005 3:09 pm

I'm listening to the Juilliard Quartet perform beautifully Beethoven's late string quartets. Then I'm moving onto listen to Mozart's late string quartets performed by the Talich Q. and the ABQ.. I'm doing an A/B comparison here.

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:40 pm

I just listened to Vaughan Williams Symphony No. 5 played by Haitink and the London Philharmonic while watching the sun set over the water. Now it's time to kick back and enjoy a beer and some jazz with Rob McConnell & the Boss Brass - my favorite post-swing era big band.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Febnyc
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Post by Febnyc » Fri Mar 25, 2005 7:44 pm

A new BIS disc of music by a composer whose name was new to me - Francisco Mignone (1897-1980). I listened with a growing appreciation and amazement.

Mignone was Brazilian and wrote very much in the folk idiom of that country and, especially, of the rhythms of the Matto Grosso.

The third work on this CD - Maracatu de Chico Rei - is a ballet score. Each dance is gripping. Some of them are so carnal and uninhibited, with wild pulsating rhythms, that they resemble, but even are more sensual than, The Rite of Spring. I was not ready for such an overpowering experience. I'd love to see this ballet staged - the music is almost savage in its beauty.

Another composer resurrected from the dust bin of history by an enterprising recording company.

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Mar 25, 2005 8:30 pm

Febnyc,

Have you seen the Rite of Spring well staged and danced?

Mark

Guest

Re: WAYTL

Post by Guest » Fri Mar 25, 2005 9:09 pm

mahlerfan wrote:What are you listening to?
You named this thread WAYTL. You should be more careful. If it's an acronym it would translate to "WHAT ARE YOU TO LISTENING" . Tsk, Tsk, Such a terrible mistake for a psu associated student. :D

But anyway, since it's "Good Friday". I'm listening to the Mahler "Resurrection" Symphony. L.B and the NYP.

mahlerfan
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Post by mahlerfan » Fri Mar 25, 2005 10:55 pm

How embarrasing, what a goof! :oops: Well it probably had to do with my sleepiness.

I'm listening to Jochum/BPO play the hell out of Bruckner's third! :)

Colin
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Post by Colin » Fri Mar 25, 2005 11:20 pm

One of my Brother's finest: Bach's 'Ich habe genung' BWV 82

Which, for those whose 'French' is as poor as mine, means, 'It is enough!'

May I take the liberty of quoting a morsel more, at Easter...

"It is enough! I have received the Saviour, the hope of the faithful, into my yearning arms.

It is enough! I have seen Him. My faith has pressed Jesus to my heart;
Now I wish only that, even today, I may depart this earthly life."

Bach took his theme from the prophet Simeon at Christ's dedication (See Luke 2:21-40), and his reaction to holding the baby Messiah in his arms.

But like all anointed servants of God, Bach's words resonate at many levels.
Anyone who is truly born of God, those who have Christ in their heart, can echo those words wholheartedly!

It is enough! I'm ready to go home...

And Father answers, 'Not yet son, we've still got work to do down here. It's what I saved you for.'

Colin

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Post by jbuck919 » Sat Mar 26, 2005 1:17 am

Colin wrote:One of my Brother's finest: Bach's 'Ich habe genung' BWV 82
The Germans have a similar saying: "Ich habe genug." Und Mensch, ich habe bei diesem Oster schon ganz und gar genug gehabt.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Colin » Sat Mar 26, 2005 1:34 am

'Scuse my 'French', but as my dear Brother would almost certainly say,

'Brunnen zuhören einer anderen CD mein Freund'

Colin

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Post by jbuck919 » Sat Mar 26, 2005 2:27 am

Colin wrote:'Scuse my 'French', but as my dear Brother would almost certainly say,

'Brunnen zuhören einer anderen CD mein Freund'

Colin
Take my advice and stay away from the online translators. Your "dear brother," who expressed himself properly in French, Italian, and Latin without ever having left Germany, did not suffer fools gladly.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Febnyc
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Post by Febnyc » Sat Mar 26, 2005 8:18 am

Mark@anstendig.com wrote:Febnyc,

Have you seen the Rite of Spring well staged and danced?

Mark
Thanks, Mark. Yes, indeed I have. I don't recall the venue (it was a long time ago), but I believe it was by the ABT at the Met in New York City. I was up all night afterwards, thinking about the ferocity of the work. Still, I'd rate this Mignone piece at the same level - or even higher - of intensity and carnality. At least I get that feeling from the music alone. Some enterprising choreographer could have a field day with it!

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Post by Barry » Sat Mar 26, 2005 9:38 am

From the Fricsay set: Scheherazade and Hartmann's 6th symphony.

This was the first time hearing the Hartmann for me and I enjoyed it a lot. It's extremely intense music.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

mahlerfan
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Post by mahlerfan » Sat Mar 26, 2005 11:17 am

Well Brahms String Quartet #1 performed by the Amadeus Quartet followed by Brahms Clarinet Quintet and Mozart's Clarinet Quintet performed by de Peyer and the Melos Ensemble of London.

I'm telling you, Brahms' and Mozart's Clarinet Quintets are some of the most sublime music ever written! 8)

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Mar 26, 2005 2:53 pm

mahlerfan wrote:I'm telling you, Brahms' and Mozart's Clarinet Quintets are some of the most sublime music ever written! 8)


Amen!
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operafan
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Post by operafan » Sat Mar 26, 2005 5:08 pm

I'm gardening and listening to Cimarosa's The Secret Mariage. Great fun.

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Post by Colin » Sun Mar 27, 2005 9:35 pm

I'm still listening to it JB, here's the Aria in my squalid 'French':

"Ich habe genung!
Ich habe den Heiland, das Hoffen der Frommen,
Auf meime begierigen Arme genommen;
Ich habe genung!
Ich hab' ihn erblickt;
Mein Glaube hat Jesum ans Herze gedruckt;
Nun wunsch ich noch heute mit Freuden von hinnen zu scheiden."

J.S.Bach (My Fellow Fool for Christ. 1 Co.1:20-31)

Guest

Post by Guest » Mon Mar 28, 2005 7:03 am

Genung again? Surely we've had genug of that?

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Post by MaestroDJS » Mon Mar 28, 2005 7:17 am

npwparis wrote:Genung again? Surely we've had genug of that?
Genung is shorthand for Gerard Hoffnung, ha ha. Thanks for the suggestion, because I'm listening to that today. It's a great way to start the week.

The Gerard Hoffnung web site:
http://www.musicweb.uk.net/hoffnung
Image

Dave

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mahlerfan
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Post by mahlerfan » Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:35 am

I was going intense with Mozart's string quartets, but I must break now because I got the set of Schiff/Vegh Mozart Piano Concertos. They are my favorite combo for Mozart piano concertos, but only now do I have the full box set! This should be cool. 8)

gmstudio

Post by gmstudio » Mon Mar 28, 2005 3:35 pm

Just some plain old boring Mahler. :) The 5th, to be exact. Boulez.

Ted

Post by Ted » Mon Mar 28, 2005 6:28 pm

György Ligeti String Quartet No 1
As we speak

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Post by Colin » Mon Mar 28, 2005 9:14 pm

Kyrie eleison ('Lord have mercy'): Which, before the Lord mercifully <a href="http://www.born-again-christian.info/te ... tm">opened my eyes and ears</a>, I used to think of as 'religious music'. Tsk!

As Bill should've written,

'If music be the food of life, Bach's music is the food of Real Life: Play on!'

Guest

Post by Guest » Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:28 pm

Now,

If you could hear those Bach works with the emotional depth they were originally performed with by people who really thought their lives depended upon God's mercy and judgement, and not upon scientific development......if we could really hear those things done by people who really felt their lives depended on it, that would be something.

Unfortunately that doesn't happen much, if at all anymore.

Mark

mahlerfan
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Post by mahlerfan » Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:31 pm

Maybe it's a matter of escaping the record collection Mark. These works are still performed in churches, by people who take it very seriously.

Guest

Post by Guest » Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:55 pm

Well, there I have it all over most: my house is in the midst of four churches within a one block radius. And in the close neighborhood, there are at least four or five more. And within 5-8 blocks there is a large temple and the great St Mary's cathedral, and many more. This is church haven for San Francisco.

I don't lack for live church music.

Some black churches really begin to get into it.

But during Bach's time, the emotional forcefullness, depth and performance really was as though one's life depended on it and the emotional extravagance was much greater than today.

If anyone can clean up some old recordings from the very early last century, like Schuman-Heink, one can get a glimpse into just how amazingly strong the emotional qualities were. Overwhelmingly so. And it was already subsiding then.

Life really has changed. That is not just reminiscing and an old guy not "getting" our modern times. I am really speaking of a reality.

In my school days, during the 50s, the music teachers were already bemoaning the demise of expressive qualities in music. I just barely got in on the tail end, and then only because I had much older teachers and friends. oherwise, I wouldn't have even known.

Mark

Guest

Post by Guest » Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:57 pm

oh,

And I didn't mean anything about taking it seriously or not. I know a great many take it seriously.

It is a matter of performance practice and what people will allow themselves emotionally......and probably a lot more.

Mark

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Post by MACHINA weapon » Tue Mar 29, 2005 1:52 am

I listen back to obscure cassette recordings back when I was still a young un'. Manfred Overture and Symphony no 4 by Schumann. Brilliant stuff. Then a Haitink/LPO's Leningrad symphony by Shostakovich. I'll get the Lenny recording soon. Also a paganistic Carmina Burana, the good ol' Muti recording.

mahlerfan
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Post by mahlerfan » Tue Mar 29, 2005 8:14 am

Mark, black churches!!? Do I want to know? :P :)

mahlerfan
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Post by mahlerfan » Wed Mar 30, 2005 10:16 am

Well I've been listening to Bach's sonatas for viola de gamba and harpsichord performed by Pandolfo and Alessandrini. Good stuff. 8)

Barry
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Post by Barry » Tue Apr 05, 2005 1:48 pm

I just had an amazing listening experience. It was Stokowski's arrangement of Love Music from Tristan's Acts II and III with the Philadelphia Orchestra; a studio recording from 1960 when Stoki made his return to Philly.

I don't think I've ever heard a more gorgeous sounding recordings. I really am trying to calm down from this state of ecstasy since I'm at the office.

http://www.andante.com/article/article.cfm?id=16538
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

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Post by MaestroDJS » Tue Apr 05, 2005 2:59 pm

Barry Z wrote:I just had an amazing listening experience. It was Stokowski's arrangement of Love Music from Tristan's Acts II and III with the Philadelphia Orchestra; a studio recording from 1960 when Stoki made his return to Philly.

I don't think I've ever heard a more gorgeous sounding recordings. I really am trying to calm down from this state of ecstasy since I'm at the office.
Amazing! I have the exact same impression. Last month over on GMG, someone asked "What is the most 'beautiful' piece of music?" and I wrote:
MaestroDJS wrote:In February 1960, Leopold Stokowski made a triumphant return to the Philadelphia Orchestra as a guest conductor. This resulted in 2 of the most "beautiful" recordings I've ever found. About 5 years ago I found a 2nd-hand LP in nearly pristine condition of El amor brujo by Manuel de Falla (with Shirley Verrett-Carter, Mezzo-Soprano) and the Love Music from Acts II and III of Tristan und Isolde by Richard Wagner. Leopold Stokowski conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in stupendous stereo sound, and Stokowski himself prepared the symphonic synthesis of Wagner's music. I don't know whether these are the best performances of this music, but this may be the most rapturous and sensual record in my classical collection. Oh it's so gorgeous.
Dave

David Stybr, Engineer and Composer: It's Left Brain vs. Right Brain: best 2 falls out of 3
http://members.SibeliusMusic.com/Stybr

Coordinator, Classical Music SIG (Special Interest Group) of American Mensa

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Post by Barry » Tue Apr 05, 2005 3:03 pm

Yes. In terms of pure beauty of sound, I'm not sure that I've heard it topped.

I listened to it on the Andante website. I think it was also included in the Philadelphia Orchestra's 100th anniversary commemorative set a few years ago.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

Guest

Post by Guest » Wed Apr 06, 2005 2:52 am

Just the other day, I picked up the recording in the "Great Conductors of the 20th Century" series dedicated to Arturo Toscanini.

On it, he leads the most spendid, bucolic, and gorgeous sounding Beethoven "Pastoral" that I have ever heard. It's from 1938 with the BBC Philharmonic in Queens Hall, London. The sound is really not that bad.

But for me the star section of the recording is "Brunnhildes Immolation and Final pages of Gotterdammerung" Helen Traubel is Brunnhilde. She is not Flagstad, but her diction and annunciation top even that great lady.
But in the final pages Toscanini summons a sound from the NBC Symphony that can only be described as heavenly awesome. The "Redemption" motif rises from the strings of the orchestra like it is summoned from the abyss. The recording is from 1941 in Carnegie Hall, and right now it is the most beautiful and affecting music I've ever heard.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Apr 06, 2005 3:21 am

Barry Z wrote:I just had an amazing listening experience. It was Stokowski's arrangement of Love Music from Tristan's Acts II and III with the Philadelphia Orchestra; a studio recording from 1960 when Stoki made his return to Philly.

I don't think I've ever heard a more gorgeous sounding recordings. I really am trying to calm down from this state of ecstasy since I'm at the office.
Music could be hazardous to your employment health.
Corlyss
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Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Apr 06, 2005 3:23 am

MaestroDJS wrote:El amor brujo by Manuel de Falla (with Shirley Verrett-Carter, Mezzo-Soprano)
I own that record too! It's my favorite version of the piece.
Corlyss
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Jul 26, 2005 11:26 am

Colin wrote:One of my Brother's finest: Bach's 'Ich habe genung' BWV 82

Which, for those whose 'French' is as poor as mine, means, 'It is enough!'
Too much work.

Easier to say basta!

:-)
Karl Henning, PhD
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