Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

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Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by lennygoran » Sat Aug 10, 2019 7:32 am

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Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Barrie Kosky’s new production of “Orpheus in the Underworld” is, he says, a “fantasy world.”

By Micaela Baranello

Aug. 9, 2019

Offenbach’s “Orpheus in the Underworld” is a parody of opera’s founding myth; a satire of 19th-century Parisian society (particularly its marriages); and a journey to music’s most famous cancan.

Instead of the traditional story of the musician Orpheus, who loses his wife Eurydice then attempts to win her back from death through the power of song, Offenbach offers a cutting alternative.

His Eurydice is irritated with Orpheus’s incessant violin playing and has an affair with the shepherd next door, who turns out to be Pluto, god of the underworld. She is only too happy to die and join him in Hades. The character of Public Opinion demands that Orpheus descend there to rescue Eurydice — not out of love, but merely in the interest of bourgeois morality.


In the words of the director Barrie Kosky, whose new production of the operetta opens at the Salzburg Festival on Aug. 14, it’s “fabulous nonsense.”

In an interview in Munich, Mr. Kosky pointed to Offenbach’s “incredibly sophisticated idea of sexual politics and gender.” But, he added, “what I absolutely can’t get enough of is the sheer brilliance of much of the music, the wonderful play with irony, with melancholy. The Dionysian life force is fantastic.”

Mr. Kosky has become a crucial advocate for the modern revival of operetta. He was first introduced to the genre as a child, courtesy of his Hungarian grandmother. At the Komische Oper in Berlin, where he has been in charge since 2012, he has directed a series of productions of forgotten works from the 1920s and ’30s, like Paul Abraham’s “Ball at the Savoy.”

While other German and Austrian theaters often stage operetta as cozy nostalgia, Mr. Kosky’s work is more snazzy musical theater — less Johann Strauss II than Cole Porter. That means drag, jazz and physical comedy; in their mixture of contemporary and period details, his productions have suggested an unsettling affinity between the rapacious capitalism of the Weimar Republic and contemporary society.

Offenbach, from an earlier era, is a different flavor of operetta. But Mr. Kosky sees a similar showbiz sparkle, pointing to the composer’s roots in variety and vaudeville theater. Written in 1858, “Orpheus” was Offenbach’s first large-scale operetta; the genre had been enabled, by a change in theatrical regulations, to expand to multiple acts and larger casts. Mr. Kosky described Offenbach as “a wonderful miasma of different theatrical styles.”


The key, he added, is variety: the sincere parts need to be taken seriously, and the funny parts need to be funny. “I think the mistake most directors make is to attempt to play one thing in the production,” he said. “It doesn’t work.”

This year marks the 200th anniversary of Offenbach’s birth, a landmark which has passed without much fanfare in the United States, where he is probably best known as the composer of “Les Contes d’Hoffmann,” his only full-fledged opera. But in Europe, productions have proliferated. In an interview, the American musicologist Jacek Blaszkiewicz called Offenbach “the prototypical European satirist. I think European audiences still, to an extent, kind of get the joke.”

For 20th-century theorists like Theodor Adorno and Siegfried Kracauer, Offenbach was a political figure; they claimed his satire deconstructed the decadence of Second Empire Parisian society and unmasked hypocrisy. More recent writers have taken a milder tack, casting Offenbach as an entertainer with satirical tendencies.

“This is not like a didactic political-polemic theater here,” Mr. Kosky said. “This is half-naked dances. There were political strands in it, but he was above all the entertainer, you know; he was writing music that was influenced by vaudeville and variety.”

Massively popular, Offenbach was both a Second Empire insider and not: a German Jew living in Paris, but one who had acclimated to local culture and whose works allowed the social elite to gently laugh at themselves. In “Orpheus,” he allowed the assembled society to see themselves as the work’s gods and goddesses — but those deities spend the evening lying, cheating, whining and otherwise misbehaving.

The reference points were well known: Gluck’s operatic telling of the Orpheus myth had recently been revived in Paris by the mezzo-soprano Pauline Viardot. And audiences today likely still know the story from Monteverdi, or the Broadway musical “Hadestown.”


Mr. Kosky’s production combines past and present, recalling Offenbach’s own mixture of mythological characters and contemporary language.

“We’re playing with images and ideas from some of my favorite time periods,” Mr. Kosky said. “It’s not set in the 19th century, it’s not set in the 21st century. It’s an entirely constructed fantasy world.

“We’re not interested in any form of naturalism here,” he added, “and I think that that liberates.”

That lack of naturalism includes the production’s most radical conceit: All the characters’ speaking voices during dialogue scenes are provided by a single actor, Max Hopp, who is cast as John Styx, the operetta’s equivalent to the underworld ferryman Charon.

The idea was initially born of expediency; clarity in the dialogue, in a single language, was difficult for the international, multilingual cast. But going further and making Styx a kind of ventriloquist for an ensemble that mouths the words as he speaks them came to Mr. Kosky one night while he was watching “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” (Think “lip sync for your life.”)

For Mr. Kosky, Styx, the only mortal who has lived and lost, represents the constant presence of death; he sings an elegy for his days as a king. “The sadness of his song,” Kracauer wrote, “is the sadness of one to whom the present means nothing, the past everything.” Mr. Blaszkiewicz, the musicologist, even suggested that Styx can be seen as a stand-in for Emperor Napoleon III, a supporter of Offenbach.

At the Salzburg Festival, operetta has had its ups and downs. In 2001, the director Hans Neuenfels took the role of social critic to an extreme when he unleashed a production of Johann Strauss’s “Die Fledermaus,” perhaps the most recognizable operetta, that suggested that Austrian culture was a vortex of sex, drugs and fascism. Audiences were largely unamused.

At least as he describes it, Mr. Kosky’s approach less confrontational. He said he is proud to put Offenbach in the Salzburg “pantheon, where he belongs.”

“If he knew that his ‘Orpheus in the Underworld’ was being performed in the Haus für Mozart in Salzburg, with his love of Mozart,” Mr. Kosky added, “I think he’d be smiling in his grave.”



https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/09/arts ... zburg.html

John F
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by John F » Sat Aug 10, 2019 9:28 am

I think Kosky's approach and attitude are exactly right for Offenbach's comedy. Over the years I've picked up all the longer operrettas and many one-acters in lively recordings but have never been able to see them, except (oddly) two productions of "The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein," for me islands of fun in a rather dull ocean of other stuff. On the other hand, there's this:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXDccmLiTGk

"Ba-Ta-Clan" was so popular that the Parisians named a music hall for it.
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by lennygoran » Sat Aug 10, 2019 5:32 pm

John F wrote:
Sat Aug 10, 2019 9:28 am
I think Kosky's approach and attitude are exactly right for Offenbach's comedy.
John I'd give it a shot if it came to our area. Regards, Len

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by Belle » Sat Aug 10, 2019 7:14 pm

I'd be tempted to take large bowls of popcorn to that one!!

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by lennygoran » Sun Aug 11, 2019 6:35 am

Belle wrote:
Sat Aug 10, 2019 7:14 pm
I'd be tempted to take large bowls of popcorn to that one!!
Belle when we attend the HD performances in Rockaway NJ some people bring in large containers of popcorn-the smell can be intoxicating! Regards, Len :lol:

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by Belle » Sun Aug 11, 2019 4:15 pm

I love it. :D

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Sun Aug 11, 2019 5:40 pm

lennygoran wrote:
Sun Aug 11, 2019 6:35 am
Belle wrote:
Sat Aug 10, 2019 7:14 pm
I'd be tempted to take large bowls of popcorn to that one!!
Belle when we attend the HD performances in Rockaway NJ some people bring in large containers of popcorn-the smell can be intoxicating! Regards, Len :lol:
And the crunching, of course, is a "welcome" addition to the score. Grrrrr. :x

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Sun Aug 11, 2019 5:47 pm

I've seen a few Offenback productions, all with a great deal of pleasure. Twice I've seen La Belle Helene, the first conducted by my father. Then four Tales of Hoffman, with Joan Sutherland and later Arleen Auger as the three women, an Orpheus in the Underworld and finally a chamber opera production of The Red Apple - a very insubstantial one-acter put on as a double bill with Bernstein's Trouble in Tahiti.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by maestrob » Mon Aug 12, 2019 11:17 am

barney wrote:
Sun Aug 11, 2019 5:47 pm
I've seen a few Offenback productions, all with a great deal of pleasure. Twice I've seen La Belle Helene, the first conducted by my father. Then four Tales of Hoffman, with Joan Sutherland and later Arleen Auger as the three women, an Orpheus in the Underworld and finally a chamber opera production of The Red Apple - a very insubstantial one-acter put on as a double bill with Bernstein's Trouble in Tahiti.
I think I've mentioned here before that my first date with my wife was a production of "The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein," starring my wife's then voice teacher. A rollicking fun time was had by all! :D

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Mon Aug 12, 2019 5:51 pm

How do you feel about Gilbert and Sullivan, Brian? I believe the US is one of the few countries outside England where they have, or at least have had, some popularity.
Poorly done, as in most amateur productions, it is excruciating, but Opera Australia has done some really fine and amusing productions of Pinafore, Mikado, Trial by Jury, Patience and, I think, the Pirates of Penance. Some excerpts are on YouTube.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by Belle » Mon Aug 12, 2019 5:56 pm

Amateur performers have all but killed off G&S in Australia. And they are very earnest amateur performers who have no idea that what they're doing is truly terrible!! They see performing G&S as 'classical music'.

Our PM has been criticized because he's called out the public service by people who've never heard G&S or watched "Yes, Prime Minister" and "Yes, Minister". Both excellent British satires about the public service and its mentality. "HMS Pinafore" - 'the only ship .. was a partnership'!!!

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by maestrob » Tue Aug 13, 2019 10:24 am

barney wrote:
Mon Aug 12, 2019 5:51 pm
How do you feel about Gilbert and Sullivan, Brian? I believe the US is one of the few countries outside England where they have, or at least have had, some popularity.
Poorly done, as in most amateur productions, it is excruciating, but Opera Australia has done some really fine and amusing productions of Pinafore, Mikado, Trial by Jury, Patience and, I think, the Pirates of Penance. Some excerpts are on YouTube.
Love Gilbert & Sullivan, Barney! I was in productions of both Pirates of Penzance and Pinafore when I was in High School, and loved every minute of it. We used to have a very good semi-professional group here in NY that would mount 1 or 2 productions per year, but sadly they're gone now, along with many other worthy groups. Opera and operetta are just too expensive to mount in our rapidly gentrifying city, plus singers can no longer afford to live here.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by John F » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:43 am

If you're talking about the New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, they're still in business, and next season they will be doing "Iolanthe" (October 26-7), "The Mikado" (December 27-30 and January 4-5), and "The Gondoliers" (April 18-19), plus a New Years Eve gala. Performances will be at the Kaye Playhouse except the gala, which will be in Symphony Space's Leonard Nimoy Thalia theater.

The company also tours between its New York appearances. Currently they have "a unique cabaret act, 'I’ve Got a Little Twist,' created and directed by David Auxier, [which] is currently touring throughout the country... “Take Gilbert & Sullivan, add a TWIST of Broadway, and stir!” is Twist’s recipe. Highlighting Musical Theatre’s roots in Gilbert & Sullivan."
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by maestrob » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:34 pm

John F wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:43 am
If you're talking about the New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, they're still in business, and next season they will be doing "Iolanthe" (October 26-7), "The Mikado" (December 27-30 and January 4-5), and "The Gondoliers" (April 18-19), plus a New Years Eve gala. Performances will be at the Kaye Playhouse except the gala, which will be in Symphony Space's Leonard Nimoy Thalia theater.

The company also tours between its New York appearances. Currently they have "a unique cabaret act, 'I’ve Got a Little Twist,' created and directed by David Auxier, [which] is currently touring throughout the country... “Take Gilbert & Sullivan, add a TWIST of Broadway, and stir!” is Twist’s recipe. Highlighting Musical Theatre’s roots in Gilbert & Sullivan."
Wonderful! They had stopped mailing me years ago, so I just assumed they were gone. Glad to hear they're alive and kicking. :)

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by John F » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:47 pm

It used to be that NYGASP imitated the D'Oyly Carte productions as closely as possible, and that was fine with me. They even had John Reed as a guest performer, I believe in "The Mikado." Whether this traditional approach still true I don't know, as I haven't seen any of their shows in a while. But they never used to indulge in "concept" productions and I hope they still don't.
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:51 pm

I've never seen a G&S concept production. You mean a version of regiestheater? I suppose the Broadway Pirates with Kevin Kline, Linda Rondstadt and Angela Lansbury might be taken as such, but I loved it - I thought it was entirely faithful to the humour.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by John F » Tue Aug 13, 2019 10:17 pm

English National Opera's "Mikado," staged by Eric Idle of the Monty Python group, was set in 1920s England. There's nothing Japanese to be seen. Here's a sample, with Idle himself as Ko-ko:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6URZJ31bwv4

The whole thing is on YouTube if you want more. :roll:
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Wed Aug 14, 2019 1:14 am

Thanks John
Actually, that seemed to me quite true to what I consider the spirit of G&SD, especially parodying the English. Lots of nice little touches. You have to rewrite the words to the list song to make it contemporary; every performance I've seen does. My main obstacle was Eric Idle's singing.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by John F » Wed Aug 14, 2019 4:39 am

Of course "Mikado" and other G&S operettas make fun of the Victorian English, but that's a subtext, and their actual stories and music are about Japanese, or fairies, or pirates, or ghosts. Gilbert went to a good deal of trouble to make "The Mikado" Japanese; you won't find Queen Victoria being welcomed by a chorus of "Miya sama." To stage the operetta according to the subtext, as if the audience were too witless to perceive it, I don't take kindly to - it feels like an insult to our intelligence.

I've a similar objection to the infamous centennial Bayreuth Ring production by Patrice Chéreau, who discovered that its subtext is about European capitalism (that was old news, Shaw told us about it eighty years before) and so forget about gods, giants, dwarfs, dragons, and the rest, we only see ordinary people on the stage. But Wagner went to a good deal of trouble to construct his drama from the ancient and medieval epics, and Wotan/the Wanderer's interventions to help Siegfried (the steam hammer to forge Nothung, the bird in the cage to tell him what's what) actually nullify a crucial element of the plot.

That's the trouble with concept productions. The director has his own story to tell and imposes it on the work, and if the result is inconsistent with the words the characters utter or the music they sing, making incoherent dramatic nonsense, they don't care and possibly they don't even realize it.
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:54 am

Well, in general I entirely agree. But in G&S, I believe the main idea is to gently mock the English, in all the operettas (or whatever we call them). Each one parodies English institutions and aspects of English culture, with different mechanisms into which much research may have gone. England had been in a Japan-craze for a little while at the time of the Mikado, and the opportunity was too good to waste.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by John F » Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:55 am

barney wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:54 am
In G&S, I believe the main idea is to gently mock the English, in all the operettas (or whatever we call them). Each one parodies English institutions and aspects of English culture, with different mechanisms into which much research may have gone. England had been in a Japan-craze for a little while at the time of the Mikado, and the opportunity was too good to waste.
True, but. Mocking the English wasn't the main idea of the operettas, or else they couldn't have been so popular and successful - "The Mikado" ran for two solid years when it was new, while as George S. Kaufman observed, "Satire is what closes on Saturday night." And that doesn't account for the music, which is sometimes ironic but at other times quite heartfelt. If the production tells the story properly, we'll get whatever social satire is still intelligible and relevant. Satire is the spice of G&S, not the main course.
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Wed Aug 14, 2019 5:43 pm

Forgive me if this is an odious comparison, but the English are generally much more inclined to laugh at themselves than Americans. Perhaps we (I speak as one born in London) have much more to laugh at. But satire does extremely well in England, whether it's G&S, the 1950s Goons, or modern television comedies. What we don't like is braggadocio and inflated self-importance, which we consider many Americans very partial to. Again, I point to the White House - contrast that with Theresa May, who is quintessentially English.Traditionally, the English have a horror of looking too obviously competent or professional, gifted amateurism is the ideal.

We'll just have to disagree on this; I am convinced that the main point of the G&S collection was indeed satire. You are right that there is some lovely music, and the stories work, sort of, by themselves. But they are the vehicle for the humour.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by John F » Wed Aug 14, 2019 6:14 pm

We definitely do disagree about this, and I'll have a look in my shelf of books about G&S to see if I can find anything by Gilbert about this, so we can move beyond assertion. I say Gilbert because while Sullivan sometimes uses parody in his music, none of it is what can properly be called satirical. (Incidentally, an exception to your rule is "The Yeomen of the Guard," which isn't satirical at all.)

I won't argue with your generalizations about Brits and Americans, except to point out that some of the most popular and long-running TV shows here - Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, for starters - have been satirical.
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by Lance » Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:30 pm

Me? Absolutely a devoted G&S fan. I have the Elektra-Nonesuch recording of Pirates with Ronstadt and Kline - loved it - though it was quite different than the usual concept of this, one of the best G&S operettas. Ronstadt did a marvelous job with "Poor Wandering One." If music is meant to be entertaining (in the best sense of the word), then G&S will do it. But I have all the others in the more customary presentations. We regularly have G&S performed in our area and it is well supported. Even our regular opera company is putting one on their roster! I am rather surprised, however, that, in Australia, it is not well represented. I would have thought the complete opposite. The "patter" songs are always a great treat.
barney wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:51 pm
I've never seen a G&S concept production. You mean a version of regiestheater? I suppose the Broadway Pirates with Kevin Kline, Linda Rondstadt and Angela Lansbury might be taken as such, but I loved it - I thought it was entirely faithful to the humour.
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Thu Aug 15, 2019 5:50 pm

Lance wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:30 pm
Me? Absolutely a devoted G&S fan. I have the Elektra-Nonesuch recording of Pirates with Ronstadt and Kline - loved it - though it was quite different than the usual concept of this, one of the best G&S operettas. Ronstadt did a marvelous job with "Poor Wandering One." If music is meant to be entertaining (in the best sense of the word), then G&S will do it. But I have all the others in the more customary presentations. We regularly have G&S performed in our area and it is well supported. Even our regular opera company is putting one on their roster! I am rather surprised, however, that, in Australia, it is not well represented. I would have thought the complete opposite. The "patter" songs are always a great treat.
barney wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:51 pm
I've never seen a G&S concept production. You mean a version of regiestheater? I suppose the Broadway Pirates with Kevin Kline, Linda Rondstadt and Angela Lansbury might be taken as such, but I loved it - I thought it was entirely faithful to the humour.
Well, as I said above, Opera Australia does it from time to time, and does it brilliantly, in my view. But 40 years ago there were far more amateur or semi-professional productions. Tastes change, and if young people never see G&S they can't love love it.
I have a video of the Kline-Ronstadt production, and it is laugh-out-loud funny. Kline is wondrous as the swashbuckling king, very athletic, and Ronstadt is superbly coy. I found the music annoying at first, the synthesiser, but I soon got used to that.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Thu Aug 15, 2019 5:55 pm

John F wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 6:14 pm
We definitely do disagree about this, and I'll have a look in my shelf of books about G&S to see if I can find anything by Gilbert about this, so we can move beyond assertion. I say Gilbert because while Sullivan sometimes uses parody in his music, none of it is what can properly be called satirical. (Incidentally, an exception to your rule is "The Yeomen of the Guard," which isn't satirical at all.)

I won't argue with your generalizations about Brits and Americans, except to point out that some of the most popular and long-running TV shows here - Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, for starters - have been satirical.
Well we're probably not impossibly far apart. You concede that satire is essential to understanding and performing G&S, and I concede there are real stories with excellent music and that the satire is located inside this.

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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by John F » Fri Aug 16, 2019 12:32 am

Gilbert seems never to have mentioned satire in talking about his comic operas. He called them "burlesques," meaning "an absurd or comically exaggerated imitation of something, especially in a literary or dramatic work." And indeed that's what operettas such as "Ruddigore" and "The Sorcerer" are. As for satire, I make a distinction between merely making fun of something and attacking it. Gilbert was no Aristophanes or Jonathan Swift, his send-ups of the English class system are cheerful and he didn't intend to bring it down, merely to provide a topsy-turvy denouement to a comedy, as in the final scene of "H.M.S. Pinafore."

For that reason.I object to productins like the ENO's "Mikado" which are all about the satire rather than telling the story properly. And Gilbert would have objected too. He went to extreme lengths to make his production of "Mikado" look as Japanese as possible, even bringing in a Japanese lady to teach the singers how to move and use their fans. As G.K. Chesterton wrote, "'The Mikado' is not a picture of Japan, but it is a Japanese picture. It is a picture deliberately limited to certain conventions of color and attitude; it is...something to be seen ón many a vase and jar, on many a screen and fan.' There is not a single European character or costume, and there could not be without destroyng the whole fantastic conception and color scheme." Take note, Eric Idle. Clearly the Japonaiserie was not and is not mere decoration; it's essential to the show's effect.

Similarly, to go back to my other example, the Chéreau Ring cycle's updating of the period makes no sense in a drama in which a spear and a sword aren't just props but central to the meaning of the story. Tell me about a 19th century capitalist who engraves treaties in runes on a spear he is never without. Sheesh!
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Re: Offenbach’s ‘Fabulous Nonsense’ Hits Salzburg, With Cancan

Post by barney » Fri Aug 16, 2019 5:51 pm

Well thanks for doing that research. I'll let that be the last word.
Except of course...
It seems that we have been working with slightly different connotations of satire. Google's online dictionary (I was too lazy to walk the 15 yards to my Shorter Oxford) gives burlesque as a synonym for satire. I certainly agree G&S is not savage or designed to bring down, it is an affectionate lampooning.

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