Conductor Siegfried Landau and Wife Die in Fire

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Conductor Siegfried Landau and Wife Die in Fire

Post by Ralph » Thu Feb 22, 2007 8:40 pm

Electrical Short Suspected in Fire


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published: February 22, 2007

Investigators seeking the cause of a house fire that killed the founder of what is now the Brooklyn Philharmonic Orchestra are examining a possible electrical malfunction, the state police said yesterday. The founder and former conductor, Siegfried Landau, 85, and his wife, Irene Gabriel, 77, a former ballet dancer, died in the fire early Tuesday, said Brian Langdon, the Franklin County coroner. Mr. Landau left the orchestra, which was originally called the Brooklyn Philharmonia, in the early 1970s after 17 years, a spokesman said yesterday. Gary Brown of the State Police said that an electrical short in a bedroom might have started the fire.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 17621
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Post by Lance » Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:45 pm

Very sorry to see Landau's career end this way. I have many recordings (I think on Vox) with Siegfried Landau conducting. How tragic. Nobody knows how things are going to end ... maybe it's better that way. The poor man had suffered much losing most of his family in the Holocaust. Here's another story and link. Wish I could find his birth date.

http://www.nysun.com/article/48982?page_no=3
Last edited by Lance on Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:50 pm

Who?
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

Allen
Posts: 544
Joined: Sat May 31, 2003 12:56 pm

Post by Allen » Sun Feb 25, 2007 2:11 am

Lance,

Siegfried Landau was born on Sept. 4, 1921.

See article below:

link

Siegfried Landau, Conductor, Dies at 85

By DENNIS HEVESI
Published: February 21, 2007

Siegfried Landau, the founding conductor of what is now called the Brooklyn Philharmonic Orchestra, died on Monday night, along with his wife, Irene Gabriel, in a fire at their home in Brushton, in northern New York State. Mr. Landau was 85. His wife, a former ballet dancer, was 77.

The deaths were confirmed by Adam Teeter, a spokesman for the Brooklyn Philharmonic, which was known as the Brooklyn Philharmonia during Mr. Landau’s tenure, from 1955 to 1971. From 1961 to 1968, Mr. Landau was also conductor of the White Plains Symphony.

From both podiums Mr. Landau regularly insisted on conducting new or rarely performed works — sometimes to the consternation of orchestra board members.

“He put together a corps of top-notch, professional freelance players from New York,” said Maurice Edwards, a former executive director of the Brooklyn Philharmonia and the author of “How Music Grew in Brooklyn” (Scarecrow Press, 2006). “He did at least two or three new compositions each season, or revivals of neglected symphonic scores.”

Mr. Evans said Mr. Landau introduced audiences at the Brooklyn Academy of Music to Ernest Bloch’s “Symphony for Trombone and Orchestra,” William Schuman’s “Symphony for Strings” and works by Carl Nielsen, John Corigliano and Roy Harris. Mr. Landau also conducted concert versions of operas, had modern dancers on programs and started a series of free concerts for schoolchildren.

Born in Berlin on Sept. 4, 1921, Mr. Landau was the son of Ezekiel and Helen Grynberg Landau; his father was an Orthodox rabbi. He studied music at the Stern and Klindworth-Scharwenka Conservatories in Germany, and in 1939, the family fled from Berlin to London, where Mr. Landau continued his musical studies at the Guildhall School.

A year later, Mr. Landau came to New York, where he studied with the conductor Pierre Monteux. By 1943, he had joined the faculty of the New York College of Music, now part of New York University. He was also a frequent guest conductor for the Carnegie Pops and Hunter College concerts.

In 1954, Mr. Landau married Ms. Gabriel. They are survived by two sons, Robert and Peter, and Mr. Landau’s sister, Lotte Landau.

In 1971, he resigned from the Brooklyn Philharmonia when the orchestra, then financially troubled, shortened its season, limiting his innovative work. Ten year later, Mr. Landau resigned from the White Plains Symphony Orchestra, which had previously been known as the Music for Westchester Orchestra. At the time, the orchestra’s president, Philip Carret, said the board objected to programs that included Sibelius’s Symphony No. 4, Bartok’s “Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta” and Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony. “Programs have to be such that we can raise money for the orchestra,” Mr. Carret said. The orchestra stopped performing in 1987.

Mr. Landau’s response was: “If I stayed with the same old warhorses year after year, if I permitted the repertoire to stagnate and become impoverished, I would no longer be serving the course of music. What is of enormous importance is that we take a stand against a tendency that is absolutely deadening to the future of Western music.”

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 17621
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Post by Lance » Sun Feb 25, 2007 2:36 pm

Thank you, Ralph - and Allen - for providing this good information and links to more information about this tragedy. Landau was a man who followed his dream of performing unknown works and held to his guns in this regard. It didn't gain him a great deal of popularity among orchestras, but at least he did what he wanted. It was interesting, too, to learn that he was a protégé of the great Pierre Monteux. They are a dying breed.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 30 guests