What if all the beloved recordings are lost?

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danglam
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What if all the beloved recordings are lost?

Post by danglam » Fri Feb 23, 2007 8:52 pm

Each one of us has his own favorite recordings for each of his favorite pieces. What if these recordings somehow get lost?
Are there such good composers/performers as those who used to record all the legendary performances?
Isn't it a scary thought - to lose such a piece of history?

Lance
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Re: What if all the beloved recordings are lost?

Post by Lance » Fri Feb 23, 2007 10:13 pm

danglam wrote:Each one of us has his own favorite recordings for each of his favorite pieces. What if these recordings somehow get lost?
Are there such good composers/performers as those who used to record all the legendary performances?
Isn't it a scary thought - to lose such a piece of history?
Well, if we lost them say ... because of a (God forbid) fire, or there was another world war, and everything was destroyed, and I came from way beneath the ground in order not to be bombed myself, and found no recordings of any kind left, then it would be a huge loss, not to mention the loss of everything, especially humanity.

However, if EMI or RCA-BMG/Sony Classical burned to the ground today, and since the digital revolution, many people throughout the world have digital copies, or copies of LPs or even 78s ... these companies could continue to exist with the hundreds of thousands of discs that remain. These discs could be copied and business could (almost) be business as usual.

Do I think there exist artists of the caliber of those of yesteryear whom we hold in highest esteem could give us incredible music making today? Yes, I believe they could. We might still miss the Rubinsteins or Horowitzes, Furtwanglers, etc. of the world, but there are many incredbly gifted musicians out there.

Let's keep our fingers crossed that nothing ever gets as bad as what you suggest!
Lance G. Hill
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Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Sat Feb 24, 2007 12:03 am

Fortunately, as with books there are good archivists not only preserving great performances but insuring their availability.
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Corlyss_D
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Re: What if all the beloved recordings are lost?

Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Feb 24, 2007 1:57 am

danglam wrote:Each one of us has his own favorite recordings for each of his favorite pieces. What if these recordings somehow get lost?
You mean like when the media change, say from 78s to lp, or from tape to cd, and you can't play your collection any more because nobody makes or services the machines on which you played them? In 200 years time will the libraries be able to read documents preserved on 1985 media?
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Sapphire
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Post by Sapphire » Sat Feb 24, 2007 6:46 am

I think that danglam is really asking whether modern artists are capable of filling the gap if, somehow or other, all our "old" favourite recordings were lost or confiscated or whatever. It's an entirely hypothetical question. My answer is that I would greatly miss some old recordings (eg Furtwangler's Beethoven) and nothing could replace it. This doesn't mean that modern conductors (or pianists etc) are less good than these older masters, merely that one gets used to certain "sounds" and may prefer them to other, more recent versions. It's not a long term problem, however, because as we lot die off the next generation of classical fans will probably prefer what are now current versions. In other words, the whole thing moves forward, so that if, say, Furtwangler was not available in 2050 no one would be bothered.


Saphire

danglam
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Post by danglam » Sat Feb 24, 2007 1:25 pm

Saphire wrote:It's an entirely hypothetical question.
Gee thanks, I thought that nobody would understand that already...

Lance
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Post by Lance » Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:36 pm

danglam wrote:
Saphire wrote:It's an entirely hypothetical question.
Gee thanks, I thought that nobody would understand that already...
No, I think everybody understood. It's a darn good hypothetical question, too! :)
Lance G. Hill
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Opus132
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Post by Opus132 » Sun Feb 25, 2007 6:27 pm

I'd probably kill myself... :lol:

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