What are YOU listening to today?

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

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piston
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Post by piston » Mon Aug 27, 2007 3:58 pm

Paul Dukas
La Péri: poème dansé en un tableau;
Polyeucte: ouverture pour la tragédie de Corneille;
L'Apprenti sorcier.
Orchestre national de l'ORTF, Jean Martinon. Erato STU 70699.

Variations, interlude et final sur un thème de Rameau;
La plainte, au loin, du faune....
Vladimir Pleshakov, piano. Orion 7820-2.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

Philoctetes
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Post by Philoctetes » Mon Aug 27, 2007 6:07 pm

Debussy's Prelude (Faun), Nocturnes, and La Mer.
Played by the BRT Philharmonic Orchestra, Brussels
Conducted by Alexander Rahbari

Given to me by Eric (The Pink Harp).

Haven't heard from him in a while though.
hmmm....
"And the wife looks at her husband one night at a party, and loves him no more.
The energy leaves the wine, and the minister falls leaving the church."
Bly

Philoctetes
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Post by Philoctetes » Mon Aug 27, 2007 6:59 pm

In response to my previous post:

That is a goregous piece of music, especially the second movement, such longing, it really reminded me of Eric.

:(
"And the wife looks at her husband one night at a party, and loves him no more.
The energy leaves the wine, and the minister falls leaving the church."
Bly

Donaldopato
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Post by Donaldopato » Mon Aug 27, 2007 8:19 pm

Listening to the BBC Proms concert featuring the world premiere of John Adams' "Dr. Atomic Symphony". My verdict still out on the piece, interesting and colorful, but I do not see the makings of a symphony. But maybe with time....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/index.shtml

Click on "Listen Again" Prom # 50

I think it goes off line tomorrow.
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Aug 28, 2007 8:14 am

Dmitri Dmitriyevich
The Execution of Stepan Razin, Opus 119
Charles Austin
Seattle Symphony Chorus
Seattle Symphony Orchestra
Gerard Schwarz


One of my favorite Naxos discs, indeed.
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
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karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Aug 28, 2007 8:54 am

Dmitri Dmitriyevich
Symphony No. 10 in E Minor, Opus 93
Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
Karel Ančerl


Brilliant account of perhaps my favorite Shostakovich symphony.
Karl Henning, PhD
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mariskr
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Post by mariskr » Tue Aug 28, 2007 1:32 pm

Fernando Lopes-Graca (Portuguese, 1906-1994)
Piano Concerto No. 1 (1940)

a fine modern, accessible, colorful work, available for listening for a few more days on the BBC website at:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/throughthenight/pip/a3twx/

piston
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Post by piston » Tue Aug 28, 2007 2:42 pm

Nadia Boulanger:
-Cinq mélodies (1909): soleils couchants, cantique, élégie, prière, larme solitaire.
-Vers la vie nouvelle, piano (1916);
-Les heures claires (1909)
-sept mélodies (1915/1922): Soir d'hiver, l'échange, chanson, le couteau, au bord de la route, doute, j'ai frappé.
-three compositions for violoncello and piano (1913)
Melinda Paulsen, Mezzosoprano.
Angela Gassenhuber, piano.
Friedemann Kupsa, violoncello.
Trouba Disc TRO-CD 01407 1993.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

Philoctetes
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Post by Philoctetes » Tue Aug 28, 2007 5:55 pm

Bruckner's Fifth Symphony conducted by Sinopoli
"And the wife looks at her husband one night at a party, and loves him no more.
The energy leaves the wine, and the minister falls leaving the church."
Bly

Donaldopato
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Post by Donaldopato » Tue Aug 28, 2007 7:17 pm

Martinu Symphony # 1 Bryden Thompson Royal Scottish National Orchestra on Chandos.
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Aug 29, 2007 9:35 am

Donaldopato wrote:Martinu Symphony # 1 Bryden Thompson Royal Scottish National Orchestra on Chandos.
How is this, Donald?

As for myself:

Hindemith, Kammermusik No. 2 for piano & 12 instruments, Opus 36 No. 1
Konzertmusik for piano, 10 brass instruments & 2 harps, Opus 49
Siegfried Mauser, pf
Frankfurt Radio Orchestra
Werner Andreas Albert


Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Wed Aug 29, 2007 9:54 am

Today, it's DG's recording of Wilhelm Kempff playing Schumann's Davidsbundslertänze. Vintage Kempff + Early Schumann = happy day at work. :)
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Aug 29, 2007 9:58 am

Hey, Ken! What's your kick against late Schumann, hunh? :-)

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
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karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Aug 29, 2007 9:59 am

karlhenning wrote:Hindemith
Konzertmusik for piano, 10 brass instruments & 2 harps, Opus 49
Siegfried Mauser, pf
Frankfurt Radio Orchestra
Werner Andreas Albert
The third movement (Sehr ruhig, Variationen) is so sweet, I listen to it three times in a row!

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Wed Aug 29, 2007 10:23 am

karlhenning wrote:Hey, Ken! What's your kick against late Schumann, hunh? :-)

Cheers,
~Karl
Oh, I do prefer late Schumann, but it is sometimes fun to listen to the mind of the burgeoning artist, he who was overtly inspired by his literary heroes. Those silly Davidsbündler!
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Wed Aug 29, 2007 11:19 am

J.S. Bach: Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 1 - 6
The English Concert
Trevor Pinnock, cond.
Archiv

Pinnock and the English Concert manage to imbue these popular pieces with both originality and good taste on period instruments. Other ensembles might throw all caution to the wind in striving for a sort of punk Baroque, still others might strip them of excitement and make them appropriate dinner music, but Pinnock and company take a just-the-other-side-of-moderate approach which is both ingratiating and mostly enlivening.

I had once been put off by extended listening to the often strident tones of the period instruments here, seemingly exacerbated by the early digital recording (1982). However, a slight cut in the upper-treble and slight boost in the mid and lower-bass seems to have alleviated that problem.

F.J. Haydn: Symphony No. 84; Symphony No. 85 "La Reine"
Concentus Musicus Wien
Nikolaus Harnoncourt, cond.
Deutsche Harmonia Mundi

I just received this yesterday; this is Disc #2 of 3 of Harnoncourt's Haydn Paris Symphonies release from 2005. Disc #1 with Nos. 82 "The Bear" and 83 "The Hen" was full of piss & vinegar -- very enlivening! This second disc seems a bit subdued in comparison, but the finale of "La Reine" is brought home powerfully and convincingly. One reviewer on Amazon wrote: "I found this set too loud, too brash, and utterly lacking in charm, grace, subtlety, and beauty of tone." Well, I said, that sounds right up my alley! :D

Schumann: Symphony No. 1 "Spring"
The Cleveland Orchestra
Christoph von Dohnányi, cond.
London

I can't rightly remember, but I think this might have been my first recording of a Schumann symphony (coupled with No. 2). I've probably "wasted" more money on recordings of the Schumann symphonies than on anything else (also Karajan, Masur, Muti, Levine, Barenboim, and Norrington), trying to find the ones that strike the perfect chord. This one isn't bad, but my favorites are probably the more lithesome performances by Masur and the London Philharmonic -- baked whitefish instead of prime rib.

Currently listening to...

Brahms: Symphony No. 4
Berlin Philharmonic
Wilhelm Furtwängler, cond. (from Dec 12-15, 1943)
Music & Arts

As was mentioned in another thread, Brahms is often an acquired taste which rewards the patient and persistent novice listener. Double that with Furtwängler. In fact, his recordings should probably come with a warning label: NOT FOR BEGINNERS!

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Aug 29, 2007 2:49 pm

Sibelius
Symphony No. 4 in A Minor, Opus 63
Ny Phil / Lenny


Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
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http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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piston
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Post by piston » Wed Aug 29, 2007 3:35 pm

Mercury SR90206: Walter Piston, The Incredible Flutist, suite from the ballet; Douglas Moore, The Pageant of P.T. Barnum, suite for orchestra. Howard Hanson, Eastman-Rochester Orchestra.

RCA Victor LM-2083: Walter Piston, Symphony No. 6; Martinu, Fantaisies Symphoniques (Symphony No. 6). Charles Munch, Boston Symphony Orchstra.

Heliodor HS-25027: Walter Piston, Quintet for piano and strings, Earl Wild, piano and the Walden String Quartet; Alan Hovhaness, Khaldis Concerto for piano, 4 trumpets and percussion, William Masselos, piano, Izler Solomon, conductor of some unidentified "chamber ensemble." (so much for trumpet and percussion musicians!)
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Thu Aug 30, 2007 8:03 am

Igor Fyodorovich, L'oiseau de feu (complete ballet)

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
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piston
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u

Post by piston » Thu Aug 30, 2007 5:27 pm

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players (with notes and commentary by Peter Ustinov):
Mozart -- Quartet in D for Flute and Strings, K. 285;
Quartet in F for Oboe and Strings, K. 370;
Beethoven -- Serenade in D for flute, violin and viola, op. 25;
Brahms -- Quartet in C Minor for piano and strings, op. 60;
Fine -- Fantasia for String Trio (1957);
Copland-- Vitebsk (1929);
Carter -- Woodwind Quintet (1948);
Piston -- Divertimento for Nine Instruments (1946).
Dynagroove LSC-6167
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

Barry
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Post by Barry » Thu Aug 30, 2007 5:58 pm

moldyoldie wrote:
Brahms: Symphony No. 4
Berlin Philharmonic
Wilhelm Furtwängler, cond. (from Dec 12-15, 1943)
Music & Arts

As was mentioned in another thread, Brahms is often an acquired taste which rewards the patient and persistent novice listener. Double that with Furtwängler. In fact, his recordings should probably come with a warning label: NOT FOR BEGINNERS!
I agree with that last statement, which is why I said on the Brahms thread that everyone should hear Furtwangler's Brahms (especially the 1st and 4th symphonies) at some point, but not when you're learning the music. I think it's always better to start with something in at least decent sound and not too radical interpretively.
My first exposure to Furtwangler was his wartime Beethoven 9th. It completely knocked me for a loop, but it may not have done so if I didn't already know the music from several other, more standard recordings. Having that point of comparison is important IMO.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

piston
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Post by piston » Fri Aug 31, 2007 8:27 am

A public performance of Walter Piston's String Quartet No. 1 (1933) by the Juilliard String Quartet, at the Pittsburgh International Contemporary Music Festival, ASCAP CB 156/7 (for non-commercial use). This work is historically significant to the members of the Juilliard String Quartet because its original members selected it, along with Bartok's first quartet and Beethoven's 12th, for their debut on October 11, 1946. Menuhin and Kodaly were in attendance.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

piston
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Post by piston » Fri Aug 31, 2007 10:24 am

Public performance of Walter Piston's String Quartet No. 2, in the Coolidge Auditorium at the Library of Congress, October 18, 1945, by the Budapest String Quartet. New World Records NW 302 Mono.

"In 1935 Mrs. Whittall (born Gertrude Littlefield Clarke in Belleview, Nebraska) gave the Library of Congress five Stradivari instruments: the "Betts," "Ward," and "Castelbarco" violins, the "Cassaveti" viola, and the "Castlebarco" cello....
The Library also maintains a string quartet in residence. For twenty-two years, beginning in 1940, the Budapest String Quartet was the resident quartet. At the time of these recordings (the mid-forties) the Budapest Quartet would play two concerts a week for six weeks in both the spring and the fall. They would rehearse only at the Library of Congress, as the Stradivari were not allowed to leave the Library. In fact Mrs Whittall is reported to have feared for the safety of the instruments in the performance of twentieth-century music, but the musicians convinced her that the Stradivari could endure the rigors of Schoenberg and Prokofieff..."
(From the liner notes written by Bruce Archibald)
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Fri Aug 31, 2007 10:32 am

Ligeti's Piano Concerto (Aimard/Boulez)
.... & a Naxos disc of Buxtehude organ works (played by Ellenberger)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Fri Aug 31, 2007 10:41 am

Hindemith, Konzertmusik für Blasorchester, Opus 41
Eastman Wind Ensemble


Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
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BC
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Post by BC » Fri Aug 31, 2007 12:45 pm

I'm listening to Shostakovich, Stravinsky and Bartok primarily, although by no means exclusively. These are composers I didn't spend a great deal of time listening to when younger. Basically, it's an attempt to make myself familiar with their most important works, and it's a fairly slow process, either because I am unfamiliar with their style, or because I'm just slow. I seem to need to listen to a piece of classical music a number of times before it feels familiar. I'm quicker with jazz where I have much more listening experience.

I've made most progress with Shostakovich -- I now feel that I know most of the symphonies well (the exceptions are 2, 3, 12, 14 and 15) also the violin and cello concertos, the piano quintet and four or five of the string quartets.

In the case of Stravinsky, I already knew some of the famous ballets. I'm now also reasonably familiar with Les Noces, A Soldier's Tale, Reynard, Agon, Apollo Musagetes, Opheus, Pulcinella, the Symphony of Psalms, Symphony In Three Movements and some others.

In the case of Bartok, I've been listening to the Concerto for Orchestra, Music for Strings Percussion and Celesta, The Miraculous Mandarin, Bluebeard's Castle, the string quartets.

All this represents several months listening. It has been richly rewarding, and there's plenty still to hear. I hope to be able to start listening to my recently acquired Berg box set soon!

piston
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Post by piston » Fri Aug 31, 2007 1:58 pm

Osvaldo Golijov, Ainadamar ("Fountain of Tears"). An opera in three images. Libretto by David Henry Hwang translated into Spanish by Osvaldo Golijov.
Margarita Xirgu...........Dawn Upshaw
Federico Garcia Lorca....Kelley O'Connor
Nuria.........................Jessica Rivera
Ruiz Alonso................Jesus Montoya
Jose Tripaldi...............Eduardo Chama
Maestro....................Sean Mayer
Torero......................Rob Asklof
Voices of the fountain...Anne-Carolyn Bird and Sindhu Chandrasekaran
Women of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus, Norman Mackenzie.
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Robert Spano.
DG-B006429-02

Analysis: I've got gooseflesh! Move over Part, Gorecki, Adams, Glass! This composer is ASTONISHING! His ability to expand the boundaries of classical music should attract a good many followers.

The guitar
makes dreams weep.
The sobs of lost
souls
escape through its round
mouth.
And like the tarantula
it weaves a large star
to trap the sighs
floating in its black
wooden cistern.

(The Six Strings, Federico Garcia Lorca)
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

piston
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Post by piston » Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:47 pm

Janacek:
The Makropulos Case
Elisabeth Soderstrom, Peter Dvorsky, Beno Blachut
The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Chorus of the Vienna State Opera
Sir Charles Mackerras
London OSA12116 (2 LPs)

Khachaturian:
Gayne Ballet
Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra
Jansug Kakhidze
Melodiya/Columbia 35195 (3 LPs)
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Mon Sep 03, 2007 10:16 pm

I don't report everything I listen to here, just sporadically.

But we were discussing 'Pictures at an Exhibition', piano version. Since then I played Kissin's version, of which I'm not enamored, and Richter's. Richter's Great Gates of Kiev is something to behold. I feel sorry for the piano for the beating it took.

Tonight, I played Brahms first Piano Quartet, opus 25, Beaux Arts Trio. This is truly one of the monuments in music - I know it's considered immature Brahms (he was only about 50 when he wrote this) - but such an accessible piece of music, with so many majestic, exuberant and delightful turns.

Then, some of Stanford, Sacred Choral Music, vol. 1, a Hyperion CD - Magnificats and Nunc Dimitises, that kind of thing. 'And I Saw another angel' is a standout piece.

Then, the Pastorale from Haitink's Beethoven set. Very accomplished; I'm looking forward to the entire set, perhaps alternating with Rattle which is more raw and less refined.

Earlier tonight - SFSO Shostakovich's 5th on the Proms, with a couple of other pieces.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Sep 04, 2007 7:08 am

Prokofiev
Cinderella, Opus 87
Cleveland Orchestra / Ashkenazy
Karl Henning, PhD
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Bösendorfer
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Post by Bösendorfer » Tue Sep 04, 2007 5:48 pm

slofstra wrote:But we were discussing 'Pictures at an Exhibition', piano version. Since then I played Kissin's version, of which I'm not enamored, and Richter's. Richter's Great Gates of Kiev is something to behold. I feel sorry for the piano for the beating it took.
I heard Horowitz's version recently, and I can't say I liked it too much... I should listen to Richter again, I don't remember him banging so hard (as for that, his live Moscow recording of the Appassionata sonata, late 50s, comes to mind!). Is it also the 1958/Sofia recording? (He usually has more than one of anything he liked to play, no?)

Just six posts to go for you. :wink:

Florian

BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Tue Sep 04, 2007 6:54 pm

Image

piston
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Post by piston » Tue Sep 04, 2007 9:04 pm

Myaskovsky
Symphonies no. 5 and 15
Svetlanov Russian Disc box sets
Comparing!
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

Donaldopato
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Post by Donaldopato » Tue Sep 04, 2007 9:51 pm

karlhenning wrote:
Donaldopato wrote:Martinu Symphony # 1 Bryden Thompson Royal Scottish National Orchestra on Chandos.
How is this, Donald?
Just saw your response. This set was on Arkiv for something like $18 and it had been a while since I explored the Martinu symphonies. Well played, idiomatic and good vintage Chandos sound.

I am not really familiar with other versions to compare fairly. It, and the other performances, do cause me to wonder why we hear so little of Martinu. The works are splendid.

Now listening to Handel "Saul". Margaret Price; Sheila Armstrong; James Bowman; Donald McIntyre, Leeds Festival Chorus English Chamber Orchestra Charles Mackerras
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

sfbugala
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Post by sfbugala » Tue Sep 04, 2007 10:44 pm

Donaldopato wrote:Listening to the BBC Proms concert featuring the world premiere of John Adams' "Dr. Atomic Symphony". My verdict still out on the piece, interesting and colorful, but I do not see the makings of a symphony. But maybe with time....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/index.shtml

Click on "Listen Again" Prom # 50

I think it goes off line tomorrow.
I heard this, too. Adams is one of my favorite composers, living or dead, so I await new works of his the way some people anticipate a new movie by a favorite actor or director. However, judging by the internet broadcast, I was underwhelmed. Perhaps Adams as conductor wasn't such a good advocate of this work. Or maybe the orchestra just didn't dig into the notes. The SLSO does the American premiere, so we'll see if hearing it live changes my perspective.

slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Wed Sep 05, 2007 9:36 pm

Bösendorfer wrote:
slofstra wrote:But we were discussing 'Pictures at an Exhibition', piano version. Since then I played Kissin's version, of which I'm not enamored, and Richter's. Richter's Great Gates of Kiev is something to behold. I feel sorry for the piano for the beating it took.
I heard Horowitz's version recently, and I can't say I liked it too much... I should listen to Richter again, I don't remember him banging so hard (as for that, his live Moscow recording of the Appassionata sonata, late 50s, comes to mind!). Is it also the 1958/Sofia recording? (He usually has more than one of anything he liked to play, no?)

Just six posts to go for you. :wink:

Florian
I checked tonight. It is the Sofia 2/58 version. It's contained on one of the 'Great Pianists' sets. The track numbering is incorrect in the liner notes. So he's banging pretty good on the second last track as well, an amazing contest between discordance and tonality - which is then resolved when the Gate of Kiev begins.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Thu Sep 06, 2007 2:24 pm

Rued Langgaard
Symphony No. 6, Det Himmelrivende (The Heaven-Storming)
Danish National Radio Symphony
John Frandsen

Hindemith
Konzertmusik for Brass & Strings, Opus 50
Philharmonia Orchestra
Paul Hindemith
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Wallingford
Posts: 4525
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Post by Wallingford » Thu Sep 06, 2007 3:06 pm

Flying back from a Labor Day weekend trip to see family in Colorado, I've had these STOCKHOLM PHILHARMONIC compilations playing in the Walkman:

Dvorak's Sixth (Ahronovich)
Scriabin's Second (Rozhdestvensky)
Kodaly's Psalmus Hungaricus (Simándy/Dorati)
Pergament's Rapsodia ebraica (von Garaguly)
Pettersson's Seventh (Dorati)
Alfven's Midsommarvaka (Grevillius)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

walboi
Posts: 212
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2005 7:31 am

Post by walboi » Fri Sep 07, 2007 12:38 pm

Ellen Taaffe Zwilich.

Chamber Symphony.

Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Orchestra, "Double Concerto.

Symphony No. 2, Cello.

The Louisville Orchestra/Lawrence Leighton Smith/ Albert George Schram.
Jaime Laredo, Violin, Sharon Robinson, Cello.

The last two works are world premiere recordings.


The music of Zwilich has a special place in my heart.

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9801
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Fri Sep 07, 2007 12:47 pm

Charles Wuorinen

Sextet for Strings
Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center

Piano Quintet
Ursula Oppens
Curtis Macomber, Carmit Zori vn
Scott St. John va
Fred Sherry vc
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9801
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Fri Sep 07, 2007 1:19 pm

Copland
Billy the Kid (Suite)
New Zealand Symphony
James Judd
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

walboi
Posts: 212
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2005 7:31 am

Post by walboi » Fri Sep 07, 2007 1:25 pm

Havergail Brian.

Festival Fanfare.

Symphony No. 2 in E minor.

Moscow SO/Tony Rowe.

Naxos 1996.

Devastating adventure, need new gear, to climb the next work of Brian.

Harry

Barry
Posts: 10228
Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:50 pm

Post by Barry » Fri Sep 07, 2007 1:31 pm

One of the great things about finally getting into downloads is that while it's obviously not the same as being there, we can now hear the latest performances from the European summer music festivals.

A few I've listened to this week:

Bruckner 4: Barenboim/VPO from the Proms
Mahler 3: Abbado/Lucerne Festival Orch/Larsson from the Proms
Mahler 9: Rattle/BPO from Berlin within the past couple weeks.

I'm planning on getting to a recent Mahler 5 conducted by Gergiev tonight.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
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Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Fri Sep 07, 2007 2:56 pm

Copland
Symphony No. 3
New Zealand Symphony
James Judd
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Brahms
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:21 pm

Post by Brahms » Fri Sep 07, 2007 3:38 pm

Third Movement of Mendelssohn's Third Symphony -- 3 times .......

piston
Posts: 10767
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:50 am

Post by piston » Fri Sep 07, 2007 9:04 pm

Prokofiev:
Sur le Borysthène, op. 51 (On the Dnieper)
Lieutenant Kijé Suite, op. 60
Semyon Kotko Suite, op. 81a.
WDR Sinfonieorchester
Loln Michail Jurowski
CPO 999=976-2

Lieutenant Kijé, with baritone Boris Statsenko, and the suite from the opera Semyon Kotko are the most stimulating works in this box set, inspired and artistically polished. Nothing strikingly "modern" or more daring than Ravel's music, but very characteristic of the more moderate Prokofiev in most of his works for ballet, opera and movies.

The ballet in two scenes On the Dnieper, later rechristened, Sur le Borysthène, is more typical of what Prokofiev occasionally did not achieve, in spite of his talent. (Boulanger referred to this trait as a composer "spoiled by his talent"). It is a relatively tuneless work which is best appreciated for its Prokofiev sound, and not its substance. In fact, the story for this ballet was the very last thing Prokofiev had to come up with, well after he engineered the whole work. Working on three different commissions (the fourth symphony, for the 50th anniversary of the BSO; the first string quartet, for the Library of Congress; and this ballet for the Paris Opera) "the story of this peiece's genesis speaks volumes. The fact was, neither Lifar nor Prokofiev had any really bright ideas. Thus they approached the project in the most abstract way imaginable: <We took the choreographic and musical structure as our starting point, with the actual theme of the ballet taking a back seat.> Starting with a bare skeleton of either "stormy ascensions" or "lyrical dying away," the composer worked his way gradually towards clearer and clearer details....and only right at the end did he trouble his head about where and when, with whom and why a story should emerge from it all..."

The plot: "A soldier falls in love with a country lass. There are tender encounters between the lovers and sentimental duets. But the father intends the girl for another man. The engagement takes place. The rejected soldier comes to the wedding feast and agrees to a duel with the bridegroom: this fight is the dramatic climax of the ballet. The soldier is seized and bound to a tree. In the finale, accompanied by calm, dreamy music, he is freed by his sweetheart."

"Here we have the whole plot of On the Dnieper opus number 51," the tuneless postpartum creation of a composer working on three different commissions.
(From the liner notes of these CPO cds)
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

slofstra
Posts: 8900
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Contact:

Post by slofstra » Fri Sep 07, 2007 9:37 pm

walboi wrote:Ellen Taaffe Zwilich.

Chamber Symphony.

Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Orchestra, "Double Concerto.

Symphony No. 2, Cello.

The Louisville Orchestra/Lawrence Leighton Smith/ Albert George Schram.
Jaime Laredo, Violin, Sharon Robinson, Cello.

The last two works are world premiere recordings.


The music of Zwilich has a special place in my heart.
Can you describe it a little?

Wallingford
Posts: 4525
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Post by Wallingford » Fri Sep 07, 2007 11:29 pm

GRIEG: SYMPHONIC DANCES; SIGURD JORSALFAR SUITE; 6 ORCHESTRAL SONGS (w/Kringelborn)--Rozhdestvensky, Stockholm Phil. (Chandos)

By virtue of this, and Rozh's old EMI album of the Peer Gynt suites & Lyric Suite, one can call him a stouthearted Griegian of the highest order. Spirited performances all the way around, though he comes up a bit short in the problematical Symphonic Dances: Grieg's weakest orchestral work (the dances are really just outsized Lyric Pieces--with perfect ABA ternary forms, with [in the case of the first & third dances] the "A" theme heard in parallel minor]). I was also just a tad perturbed at Rozh's refusal to allow the string players to do portamenti at the beginning & end of "Solvejg's Song": you know, those sighing phrases where the last two notes are B & E (start), and E & A (end). Even good ol' Neeme, I believe, let his players do that, and HE's of Rozh's generation!

In all, however, a nice disc--one that's apparently seen no less than 3 separate issues.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

jserraglio
Posts: 4648
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 08, 2007 12:09 am

Borodin Symphony 2 (last mvmt retouched by Frederick Stock)
Desire Defauw conducting the CSO.

Defauw deserves to be better known. I've been listening to his Chicago recordings recently, and the pre-Rodzinski-Kubelik-Reiner CSO sounds pretty good to me.

furiouscarolyn
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 1:00 pm

Post by furiouscarolyn » Sat Sep 08, 2007 3:03 pm

For some reason I've been listening to a lot of piano concertos lately, namely Griegs concerto in a- (:)) and Mozart concerto in d- no.20 and Ravels concerto for the left hand.

I've been listening to Scriabin constantly, mostly his etudes and sonatas rencently.

I love the Hugo Wolf Goethe Lieder (and Hugo wolf in general)

And I've been listening to a lot of Radiohead and The Beatles as usual :)

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