What are YOU listening to today?

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

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ginosec
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Post by ginosec » Sun Mar 09, 2008 12:31 am

keninottawa wrote:Sean, if you don't mind me asking, what was the wine you were drinking? I have been thinking about posting a thread about matching wine to music.
yes, do it. I would be very interested :wink:

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Post by Chalkperson » Sun Mar 09, 2008 1:11 am

Seán wrote:
Chalkperson wrote:
Seán wrote:
Chalkperson wrote:I guess Sean does not like The Liffey Water, and i'm not talking about H2O either...wassup Sean... :wink:
Are you trying to poison me Chalkie or wha'? :lol: :lol: :lol:
I'm talking about Guinness, when I spent time in Dublin (30 years ago) they referred to Guinness as a pint of the Ole' Liffey Water because the plant was backed up on the river, maybe they don't say that anymore, guess i'm now not just old but really old... :wink:
Thirty years ago you say, well we may have been sitting in the same ol' pub enjoying the black stuff. 8)
By the Ha'penny Bridge...Phillip Lynott was one of my best friend's back then, I had some great times with him in Dublin, and Belfast too...I look back on those memories with great affection...
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Seán
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Post by Seán » Sun Mar 09, 2008 5:51 am

Did you run with Gary Moore, Noel Bridgeman and Brush Sheilds then, the lads from the old Skid Row rock band? Lynott use to sing with them in the early days. This discussion is probably best placed in the pub where we may chat about the good old days, which in fact were bl**dy awful..
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

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Post by Chalkperson » Sun Mar 09, 2008 1:58 pm

Seán wrote:Did you run with Gary Moore, Noel Bridgeman and Brush Sheilds then, the lads from the old Skid Row rock band? Lynott use to sing with them in the early days. This discussion is probably best placed in the pub where we may chat about the good old days, which in fact were bl**dy awful..
I was not starting a discussion actually and I don't go into the Pu I knew Gary and Brush and many others (Geldof, BP Fallon, Rory Gallagher, Herbie Flowers, Van the Man etc) but I was merely saying that Dublin in the late seventies was a great place to go visit, reminded me a lot of New York and i'm grateful Phillip took me there...ok, back to Mahler, Mahler and yet more Mahler... :wink:

PS Guiseppi Sinopoli's Second, Fritz Reiner's Fourth and Mravinsky's Ninth to be precise...
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Sun Mar 09, 2008 4:33 pm

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Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach
Double Concertos, Oboe Concertos
Martin Haselböck
Wiener Akademie/English Chamber Orchestra
Novalis

This disc has a great recording of the rare "Concerto doppio in E flat major for pianoforte, harpsichord and orchestra", a Classical-era battle between old technology and new.
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piston
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Post by piston » Sun Mar 09, 2008 7:30 pm

Honegger
Symphonies 1, 2, 3
Serge Baudo, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra

Seán
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Post by Seán » Sun Mar 09, 2008 7:42 pm

Chalkie urged me to go back to Mahler and he's right, so I did. I listened to Haitink with the RCO and Mahler's Fourth, lovely music:

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Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

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Post by Chalkperson » Sun Mar 09, 2008 7:50 pm

Seán wrote:Chalkie urged me to go back to Mahler and he's right, so I did. I listened to Haitink with the RCO and Mahler's Fourth, lovely music:
I don't think you need a lot of prompting, and I made a mistake, I meant Mravinsky's Bruckner 9th...oops... :oops:
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Donaldopato
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Post by Donaldopato » Sun Mar 09, 2008 8:00 pm

Barber Orchestral Works Vol 1

Symphonies 1 and 2
School for Scandal Overture
First Essay

Alsop Royal Scottish Orchestra

Naxos 8.559024
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

piston
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Post by piston » Sun Mar 09, 2008 10:15 pm

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Honegger
Symphonies 1-5
Symphonic Movement Pacific 231
Michel Plasson
Orchestre du Capitole de Toulouse
EMI Classics7243 5 85516 2

Seán
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Post by Seán » Mon Mar 10, 2008 6:04 pm

Beethoven Piano Concerto No.5
Christian Zacharias piano
Stastkapelle Dresden
Hans Vonk conducting

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Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

piston
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Post by piston » Mon Mar 10, 2008 7:39 pm

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Rostropovich
The Russian Years
CDs # 7 and 11
Fernando Lopes-Graça, Concerto da camera (1966)
Lev Knipper, Concerto Monologue (1962)
Mieczyslaw Vainberg, Cello Concerto, op. 43 (1948/1953)
Boris Tischenko, Concerto, op. 23
Aram Khachaturian, Concerto-Rhapsody (1963)
Yuzo Toyama, Cello Concerto (1966/67)
EMI Classics Mono 7243 5 72298 2

Cyril Ignatius
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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Tue Mar 11, 2008 2:48 pm

Florida Suite by Delius, conducted by Thomas Beecham
Vienna 2005 New Year's Concert conducted by Lauren Maazel
Cyril Ignatius

piston
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Post by piston » Tue Mar 11, 2008 6:52 pm

André JOLIVET (1905 – 1974)
Trumpet Concerto no. 2
Concertino for trumpet
Concert suite for flute and percussion
Concerto for flute and string orchestra
Concerto for Ondes Martenot and orchestra
Concerto for harp and chamber orchestra
Cello Concerto No.1
Cello Concerto No.2
Lily Laskine (harp); Jeanne Loriod (ondes Martenot); André Navarra (cello); Mstislav Rostropovich (cello); Maurice André (trumpet); Jean-Pierre Rampal (flute); Orchestre de l’association des Concerts Lamoureux; Orchestre National de l’ORTF; Orchestre Philharmonique de l’ORTF, André Jolivet.
Recorded: ORTF Studios, Paris, December 1968-January 1969 (Cello Concerto No.1), November 1967 (Harp Concerto, Ondes Martenot Concerto); and Eglise du Liban, Paris, May 1966 and April 1967 (flute works).
Erato (1975) ERA 9123-25

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Thu Mar 13, 2008 8:32 am

Image Image

Currently marketed in this 2-CD reissue...
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Ravel: Complete Music for Solo Piano
- Pavane pour une infante défunte, for piano (or orchestra)
- Le tombeau de Couperin, for piano
- Sérénade grotesque, for piano
- Jeux d'eau, for piano
- Valses ( 8 ) nobles et sentimentales, for piano (or orchestra)
- La valse, poème choréographique for piano or 2 pianos
- Gaspard de la nuit, for piano
- Menuet antique, for piano (or orchestra)
- Menuet sur le nom d'Haydn, for piano
- À la manière de. . . , for piano
- Prélude, for piano
- Miroirs, for piano (or orchestra)
- Sonatine for piano

Louis Lortie, piano
Chandos

Ravel's music is nothing if not beguiling! Though most famous for that orchestral exercise in revolving repetition called Bolero, his various other orchestral works have always been popular favorites in the repertoire. They range from the somber yet beautiful Pavane for a Dead Princess to the swirling and colorful La Valse, the puckish Le Tombeau de Couperin, the exciting Alborada del gracioso, and several others. With the exception of Bolero, these were also all scored by Ravel for performance on solo piano and Canadian pianist Louis Lortie plays them straight with a minimum of interpretive wiggle and idiosyncrasy. The performances not only show Ravel to be a master of musical color and dynamics, but also a revolutionary early 20th Century musical iconoclast in artistic cahoots (seemingly reluctantly so) with the burgeoning Impressionism movement. These are some of my favorite piano recordings.
"Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time."
- Steve Wright

piston
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Post by piston » Thu Mar 13, 2008 6:01 pm

On this thread I generally praise or simply enumerate what's on the musical menu any given day. Today will be an exception:
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Morton Gould
Jekyll and Hyde Variations
Fall River Legend (complete ballet)
James F. Neal, Narrator
Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Kenneth Schermerhorn
Naxos 8.559242

If you've been expecting the complete ballet music to Gould's Fall River Legend, this is it. But it's a disappointment. The musical narration of this ballet music (which is how Gould composed it, for the most part) is much too slow, anticlimatic, all too often virtually passive. I have the suite and it's much better. This work, at 52:28 is painfully long and uneventful.
cheers

Seán
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Post by Seán » Fri Mar 14, 2008 9:32 am

Tonight I am going to our National Concert Hall to listen to the LSO conducted by Gergiev perform Petrushka. As you know I have only recently started developing a real passion for classical music. I have never heard an orchestra of this size and calibre perform live before today. In the past I have attended concerts and heard our National Symphony Orchestra, great jazz orchestras and Viennese small classical orchestras perform.

Today I was listening to the London Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Haitink perform Stravinsky's Petrushka

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Seán

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slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Fri Mar 14, 2008 3:13 pm

Seán wrote:Tonight I am going to our National Concert Hall to listen to the LSO conducted by Gergiev perform Petrushka. As you know I have only recently started developing a real passion for classical music. I have never heard an orchestra of this size and calibre perform live before today. In the past I have attended concerts and heard our National Symphony Orchestra, great jazz orchestras and Viennese small classical orchestras perform.

Today I was listening to the London Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Haitink perform Stravinsky's Petrushka

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If you don't clap between the movements everyone will think you've been going for years. Where are your seats?

Ken
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Post by Ken » Fri Mar 14, 2008 4:16 pm

This one's for Ralph:

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Dittersdorf:
Sinfonias in D major, A major, and E flat major
Lisbon Metropolitan Orchestra/Alvaro Cassuto
Naxos
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

Seán
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Post by Seán » Fri Mar 14, 2008 6:30 pm

slofstra wrote:
Seán wrote:Tonight I am going to our National Concert Hall to listen to the LSO conducted by Gergiev perform Petrushka. As you know I have only recently started developing a real passion for classical music. I have never heard an orchestra of this size and calibre perform live before today. In the past I have attended concerts and heard our National Symphony Orchestra, great jazz orchestras and Viennese small classical orchestras perform.

Today I was listening to the London Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Haitink perform Stravinsky's Petrushka

Image
If you don't clap between the movements everyone will think you've been going for years. Where are your seats?
Ah thanks Henry but I'm not that thick. :wink: Well, I was in row J, that is 10 rows from the orchestra and a few seats to the right of the conductor's podium.

I thoroughly enjoyed the concert. Every second of Petrushka was a dream.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Fri Mar 14, 2008 8:39 pm

Ah thanks Henry but I'm not that thick. Wink Well, I was in row J, that is 10 rows from the orchestra and a few seats to the right of the conductor's podium.

I thoroughly enjoyed the concert. Every second of Petrushka was a dream.
Glad to hear it. And it does happen you know.

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Ancerl/ Czech Philharmonic/ Dvorak "New World" Symphony No. 9

Chalkie recommended this series, I bought 3, and this is the first one I listened to. The sound is really good, very clean, nicely miked, good soundstage. Performance is excellent. The brass are particularly taut with a bit of flare. Both recording and performance very crisp. Not overly dramatic. Not only is this great sound for 1961; it's great sound for 2008.

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Schwarzkopf, Klemperer/ Concertgebouw/ Bach - Wedding Cantata

This sucks big time. I've been having such good luck with older Dutch recordings of Bach under van Beinum and Goldberg. Schwarzkopf must think she's singing Wagner, and the orchestra plays in heavily accentuated goose-stepping time. Redeemed only by some fine oboe. I happened to have another recording of this cantata with the Taverner Players and Emma Kirkby, and I played some of it after. I wanted to make sure that the problem was the performance, and not a dud cantata; what a relief the later recording is.
Now I'm worried about the Deutsches Requiem I ordered with Klemperer and Schwarzkopf; at least she doesn't sing the whole thing.

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Post by Chalkperson » Fri Mar 14, 2008 11:05 pm

slofstra wrote: Now I'm worried about the Deutsches Requiem I ordered with Klemperer and Schwarzkopf; at least she doesn't sing the whole thing.
I would not worry, that is a very, very good recording...
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val
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Post by val » Sat Mar 15, 2008 5:35 am

CORELLI: 12 Sonatas opus 5

/ Enrico Gatti, Gaetano Nasillo, Guido Morini


A very beautiful version of the opus 5.

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Post by Chalkperson » Sat Mar 15, 2008 1:04 pm

slofstra wrote:Ancerl/ Czech Philharmonic/ Dvorak "New World" Symphony No. 9

Chalkie recommended this series, I bought 3, and this is the first one I listened to. The sound is really good, very clean, nicely miked, good soundstage. Performance is excellent. The brass are particularly taut with a bit of flare. Both recording and performance very crisp. Not overly dramatic. Not only is this great sound for 1961; it's great sound for 2008
The thing about the 42 Disc Set of the great Karel Ancerl's recordings is that they are not pressed on Aluminum CD's but on Gold ones, gold allows for a far greater dynamic range and superb enhanced sound, some recordings o MDG are also pressed on gold discs...
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AntonioA
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Post by AntonioA » Sat Mar 15, 2008 2:18 pm

Beethoven Piano Concerto nr 3 Emil Gilels with George Szell conducting Cleveleland Orchestra on Angel RL 32074. The first recording I ever heard of a Beethoven concerto two decades ago. I still love this piece.
AntonioA

Seán
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Post by Seán » Sat Mar 15, 2008 7:14 pm

Today I bought a four cd set of the work of Evgeny Kissin. The box set is available on the Briliant Classics label. Earlier I listened to:

Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No 1
St Petersburg Academic Symphony Orchestra
Evgeny Kissin Piano
conducted by Valery Gergiev.


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Are you familiar with Kissin's work? I have only listened to the Tchaikovsky piece so far and I like it.
Last edited by Seán on Sun Mar 16, 2008 3:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Seán

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sfbugala
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Post by sfbugala » Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:38 pm

Zinman's new Mahler 4th with the Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich on RCA. Wow! What a wonderful recording! I sometimes feel guilty for getting yet another rendition of something I have 5 or 10 versions of already. Then, I hear something "new" and it suddenly becomes justifiable.

Good stuff.

--Steve

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Post by Chalkperson » Sat Mar 15, 2008 11:19 pm

Interesting, I bought the first three discs and thought them average, I decided not to go for Round Four, did you hear the first three...
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Seán
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Post by Seán » Sun Mar 16, 2008 4:35 am

sfbugala wrote:Zinman's new Mahler 4th with the Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich on RCA. Wow! What a wonderful recording! Good stuff.
--Steve
I have come across the Tonhalle Orchestra discs in Dublin. I will keep an eye out for the Fourth so.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Ken
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Post by Ken » Sun Mar 16, 2008 2:56 pm

In commemoration of St. Patrick's Day:

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John Field: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 and 2
Miceal O'Rourke
London Classical Players/Mathias Bamert
Chandos
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

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Post by Chalkperson » Sun Mar 16, 2008 4:11 pm

Gosh Ken, I was just about to play that cd...
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JPS
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Post by JPS » Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:41 pm

John Field: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 and 2
Very interesting ; I go and see if I can find it.
Jean-Pierre

JPS
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Post by JPS » Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:44 pm

I am listening to Haydn string Quartets op 76 from 1796-97 ; wonderful music. My favorite in this opus are 1 and 4 (Sunrise).
Jean-Pierre

sfbugala
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Post by sfbugala » Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:14 pm

Chalkperson wrote:Interesting, I bought the first three discs and thought them average, I decided not to go for Round Four, did you hear the first three...
I love Zinman's Third, mainly because of a magnificent 3rd movement, and a fabulous 2nd movement that has finally won me over to it. (Generally, I'm not thrilled with this movement.)

For me, his First is very good, but there's an array of excellent versions of this. But I gave it a try, and don't yet regret owning it. I may throw it on again tonight and give it another try.

After enjoying his Third and Fourth so much, I went ahead and ordered his Second yesterday. We'll see how it goes. Unless the cycle totally goes off the tracks, I'm really looking forward to future releases. The big question will be: Will Zinman use the "nuclear" hammerblows when he gets to the Sixth? (He's used a weird, crushing reverb on his live Baltimore account for the hammerblows, and I know he's done it live a few times this way. It's almost a party record because the sound is so insane, but I kinda like it.) Although it goes against Mahler's instruction to be a dull, hard thud, I sometimes think Mahler would've approved.

Ken
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Post by Ken » Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:33 pm

Chalkperson wrote:Gosh Ken, I was just about to play that cd...
Luck of the Irish. ;)
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

sfbugala
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Post by sfbugala » Sun Mar 16, 2008 10:33 pm

John Adams Harmonium San Francisco Symphony Orchestra under Edo de Waart.

Seán
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Post by Seán » Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:33 am

Waldesrauschen (Forest Murmurs), for piano (Zwei Konzertetuden No. 1), Franz Liszt
La Leggierezza, for piano in F minor (Grandes études de concert No. 2) , Franz Liszt
Liebesträume, notturno for piano No. 3 in A flat major, Franz Liszt
Hungarian Rhapsody, for violin & piano No. 12 in C sharp minor, Franz Liszt
Appassionata, etude for piano in F minor (Transcendental Etude No. 10), Franz Liszt

Symphonic Etudes ("Etudes in the form of variations") for piano (2 versions), Op. 13 Robert Schumann
Variations on the name "Abegg," for piano in F major, Op. 1 Robert Schumann
Widmung ("Du meine Seele, du mein Herz"), song for voice & piano (Myrthen), Op. 25/1 Robert Schumann


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Seán

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JPS
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Post by JPS » Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:38 pm

Borodine piano Quintet


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(the second quartet is better in other records)
Jean-Pierre

Seán
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Post by Seán » Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:39 pm

I listened to this earlier today, it didn't "grab me" I must listen to it again:

Gustav Holst
The Planets
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Adrian Boult
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Seán
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Post by Seán » Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:47 pm

Now I really like this, Stravinsky's, Pulcinella and Scherzo Fantastique by the New York Philharmonic conducted by Pierre Boulez. Boulez and Stravinsky are a lovely combination. I find that in some of the Pulcinella movements there's a Baroque feel to them.

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Seán

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Seán
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Post by Seán » Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:50 pm

No day would be complete without a Mahler Symphony, today it was Barbirolli with the the New Philharmonia Orchestra and Mahler's Fifth.

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Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Barry
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Post by Barry » Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:57 pm

Seán wrote:No day would be complete without a Mahler Symphony, today it was Barbirolli with the the New Philharmonia Orchestra and Mahler's Fifth.

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How do you like that one, Sean? It's been a few years since I've listened to it, but I recall thinking it was very overrated, and not worthy of the designation of one of the "Great Recordings of the Century." I've seen a lot of other people say the same thing on various boards. And I'm no anti-Barbirolli man. I do like his Mahler 6 and 9 very much; just not this 5th.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

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http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

Seán
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Post by Seán » Mon Mar 17, 2008 7:08 pm

Barry wrote:
Seán wrote:No day would be complete without a Mahler Symphony, today it was Barbirolli with the the New Philharmonia Orchestra and Mahler's Fifth.

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How do you like that one, Sean? It's been a few years since I've listened to it, but I recall thinking it was very overrated, and not worthy of the designation of one of the "Great Recordings of the Century." I've seen a lot of other people say the same thing on various boards. And I'm no anti-Barbirolli man. I do like his Mahler 6 and 9 very much; just not this 5th.
Hi Barry, I have it a few months now and don't play it very often. I find it too slow almost ponderous. I need to listen to it several times more before I'm sure how I feel about it. I'm not crazy about his Sixth either but I do really like his Ninth.
When I want to listen to the Fifth I reach for the von Karajan, Walter or the Bernstein interpretations first. von Karajan's is still my favourite but that will probably change as I learn more about it.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

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Post by Chalkperson » Mon Mar 17, 2008 7:43 pm

Barry wrote:How do you like that one, Sean? It's been a few years since I've listened to it, but I recall thinking it was very overrated, and not worthy of the designation of one of the "Great Recordings of the Century."
Hey Barry, you did not ask me but I don't think much of Sir John's Mahler, I find both the Fifth and the Sixth to be plodding and ponderous, good job it's a budget price or I would have taken it back (pretending it skipped and that they did not have another copy) and bought Karajan instead...of course the old greyhairs at Gramophone/Penguin Guide think Sir John is the bees knees... :wink:
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Barry
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Post by Barry » Tue Mar 18, 2008 12:33 am

Chalkperson wrote: ...of course the old greyhairs at Gramophone/Penguin Guide think Sir John is the bees knees... :wink:
You got that one right :!:
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

Barry
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Post by Barry » Tue Mar 18, 2008 12:36 am

This is definitely one of my favorite Kleiber performances. I think it blows the studio VPO recording of the seventh out of the water. I can't remember the last time I got this carried away listening to this symphony :!:

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slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Tue Mar 18, 2008 10:48 am

Barry wrote:This is definitely one of my favorite Kleiber performances. I think it blows the studio VPO recording of the seventh out of the water. I can't remember the last time I got this carried away listening to this symphony :!:

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Probably when you heard Rattle's. :)

(It's actually very good).

I enjoyed Szymon Goldberg's Vivaldi's Four Seasons last night, with another Vivaldi concerto thrown in to round out the CD. This is from a bargain set available at BRO. I think this is one of my favourite 'Four Seasons', quite a contrast in approach to Nigel Kennedy's which I also like immensely. I have a few others, most of which are ho-hum.

Barry
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Post by Barry » Tue Mar 18, 2008 11:02 am

I've never heard most of Rattle's Beethoven cycle, including the 7th. Most of the Beethoven I've heard him conduct has been live (either in person or via a recording of a live performance), and I've had very mixed views. I've heard him lead a couple very good 6th symphony performances, but also one I didn't like and an Eroica that didn't do anything for me.

The only other modern recording of the LvB 7 that I can think of that I find similarly thrilling is the Barenboim recording from his complete cycle. The Furtwangler wartime is another big favorite.
Last edited by Barry on Tue Mar 18, 2008 12:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

slofstra
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Post by slofstra » Tue Mar 18, 2008 12:07 pm

Barry wrote:I've never heard most of Rattle's Beethoven cycle, including the 7th. Most of the Beethoven I've heard him conduct has been live (either in person or via a recording of a live performance), and I've had very mixed views. I've heard him lead a couple very good 6th symphony performances, but also one I didn't like and an Eroica that didn't do anything for me.

The only other modern recording of the LvB 7 that I can think of that I really find thrilling is the Barenboim recording from his complete cycle. The Furtwangler wartime is another big favorite.
The 7th is one that almost always sounds good to my ears; I like all the performance of it I have (maybe 6 or 7 of them). The 'Eroica' in the Rattle EMI set is pretty bad, esp the first movement. I believe the EMI set is based on live performances cut and pasted together, but I stand corrected.

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Post by Chalkperson » Tue Mar 18, 2008 12:30 pm

slofstra wrote:"The 'Eroica' in the Rattle EMI set is pretty bad, esp the first movement.
My feelings exactly... :wink:

If you are looking for a good modern Seventh may I suggest Paavo Jarvi with the Kammerphilharmonie Bremen on RCA and also available as a SACD...or Stanislaw Skrowaczewskiwith The Saarbrucken RSO on Oehms...
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