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Ken
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Post by Ken » Tue May 27, 2008 6:48 pm

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Dohnányi: Piano Quintet No. 1, Sextet
Takács Quartet, András Schiff
London

Those of you who haven't yet heard Dohnányi's Opus 1, the C minor Piano Quintet, are missing out on some excellent late-Romantic music. Written in 1894 when he was a mere seventeen years old, the piece is forward-looking and contains distinctly Hungarian elements to it, but is also reminiscent of Brahms (particularly the first two movements), who was asked to look at the young composer's work in 1895 and decided to have it premiered at one of his concerts in Vienna.

The Sextet comes from some forty years later, by which time the composer had also established himself as a top-class pianist, conductor, and teacher. It is a highly Romantic piece in itself, though Dohnányi wrote the final movement as a lovely Jazz parody.
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moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Wed May 28, 2008 10:42 am

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This VoxBox release contains very fine performances of Ravel's most popular orchestral works, including the longest, most beautifully languorous Bolero one will ever hear (probably excepting Celibidache)! However, the Rhapsodie Espagnole, Alborada del Gracioso, Valses Nobles et Sentimentales, Menuet Antique, and Pavane for a Dead Princess all display a similar sense of both idiom and elegance and are played with expansive fervor by Stanislaw Skrowaczewski and the Minnesota Orchestra. All are captured in very clean and warm mid-'70s analog sound.

This 2-CD set is bookended by what I consider to be bonus recordings of the Piano Concerto in G Major and the String Quartet in F Major. Abbey Simon tackles the concerto's intricacies with charm and panache, accompanied sympathetically by the Orchestra of Radio Luxumbourg under Louis de Froment, if not with the nth degree of rapture. The Quartet in F Major is played with technical assurance by the New Hungarian Quartet, but is recorded a bit too closely as one hears much obtrusive breathing during the performance.

It's unfortunate for the novice and the bargain hunter that these once very economical releases (originally in two 2-CD sets) are no longer available new in their original CD incarnations, but Skrowaczewski's Ravel performances have been re-released in a couple of pricey "original surround sound" recordings by Mobile Fidelity -- I can only imagine how they sound! In any case, though I've considered culling this set to make room for more modern recordings, I can never bring myself to do it...thank goodness!
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Seán
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Post by Seán » Wed May 28, 2008 5:11 pm

Tonight I then listened to the Georg Solti/CSO recording of the Titan:

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It is a terrific performance. I rarely listen to this CD as I usually listen to my vinyl copy of Solti/LSO play the First instead.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

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Post by Chalkperson » Wed May 28, 2008 5:56 pm

Seán wrote:Tonight I then listened to the Georg Solti/CSO recording of the Titan:

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It is a terrific performance. I rarely listen to this CD as I usually listen to my vinyl copy of Solti/LSO play the First instead.
They are both good, I think, personally I play the CSO version more..
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Post by Donaldopato » Wed May 28, 2008 7:32 pm

FINALLY!!!

(sorry for the shouting)

Mahler Symphony # 10 Martinon CSO 1966.

A dramatic reading, certainly a bit faster than some of the later versions, even faster than Ormandy.

For example:
Martinon 66 min
Ormandy 70 min
Gielen 77min
Rattle Berlin 77

Actually, the opening Adagio is a bit too brisk as is the Finale and I wished for a bit more drama in the final measures of the finale. The two scherzi are well done and benefit from the brisk tempi.

Certainly if you have Ormandy one does not need this performance of the Cooke I version as it is only available in a multi disc set.

But now I have them ALL! (Evil Laugh!)
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piston
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Post by piston » Wed May 28, 2008 7:54 pm

Uuno Klami:
Karelian Rhapsody, Op. 15 (1927)
Sea Pictures (1930-32)
Kalavela Suite, op. 23 (1933-43).

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Post by Chalkperson » Wed May 28, 2008 8:13 pm

STRAVINSKY - Piano Concertos and Sonata
Maria Yudina - Gennadi Rozhdestevensky,
Vista Vera

CHOPIN - Piano Concertos Nos. 1+2
Emil Gilels - Moscow Philharmonic - Kirill Kondrashin
Melodiya

BEETHOVEN - Piano Sonatas Nos. 30+31+32
Maria Ginsberg
Melodiya
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Fri May 30, 2008 8:15 am

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Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5; Stravinsky: Rite of Spring
Karajan/BPO
DG
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moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Fri May 30, 2008 9:23 am

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Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé; La Valse
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Pierre Boulez, cond.
DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON

This morning was my first hearing of this recording. As "advertised" by a well-worn reputation, here is a clinically precise and scrupulously detailed rendering of this sprawling score (Daphnis) seemingly devoid of any spontaneity -- but the orchestra sure sounds nice! And after hearing this La Valse, one would be hard-pressed to justify its title, though the performance may be genuine to Ravel's putative purpose as a statement on the early 20th century unraveling of old European mores. Though I'm certain Boulez's approach to these works has its adherents, I'd be hesitant to recommend this recording to a sheer novice as an introduction. The strict audiophile will probably love it, however, for its incredibly wide dynamic range.

I remember this being dubbed somewhere as "a Daphnis et Chloé for the 21st Century". Well, at least it doesn't contribute to global warming.
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Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Sat May 31, 2008 12:51 am

Tchaikovsky Sleeping Beauty excerpts (Fistoulari)
Borodin's Second (Varviso)
Prokofiev Love For 3 Oranges & Scythian suites (van Remoortel)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

lismahago
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Post by lismahago » Sat May 31, 2008 3:29 am

First one those gorgeous Vivaldi Edition CDs on Naïve:

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Bassoon (and oboe and oboe and bassoon) concertos, full of colour and vigour, in very good sound recorded at a fairly high level as usual from Naïve. Then

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a new Bach Cantata CD from Philippe Herreweghe. I listened to BWV 27 Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein Ende? which I had not heard in a long time. A terrific fugue in the middle. Wonderful.

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Very lively music from l'Arlésienne, the two suites plus some extra bits (some choral) extracted by Minkowski. The CD comes in a pretty book with lots of colourful illustrations: mainly Van Gogh paintings. Vivid recording, very enjoyable. Lastly

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Nelson Freire playing Chopin on an SACD. I listened to the Op. 10 Études. Very powerful, if perhaps not as completely fluent as Pollini. But I'd prefer him to a lot of others!
Ciaran

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Sat May 31, 2008 7:48 am

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Bruckner: Symphony No. 8 (Haas ed.)
Berlin Philharmonic
Wilhelm Furtwängler, cond.
TESTAMENT

A recording from 1949 described as recorded live without an audience (Huh?). I can't say I'm necessarily "moved" by the performance here, but Furtwängler has the measure of this great work and makes it an interesting and invigorating listen with fine, mostly swift, and seemingly spontaneous music-making.
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Post by Chalkperson » Sat May 31, 2008 1:46 pm

Well Ciaran, I played the Herreweghe recording about an hour ago, and Bizet is up for later today, both are absolutely superb recordings, and I have, and enjoy, the Vivaldi and Chopin discs too...
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TopoGigio

Post by TopoGigio » Sat May 31, 2008 3:00 pm

Im in (cheap) mood...Mozart Divertimenti (137,138,247,252,287)
Conductor, Alexander Titov.
Orchestra :
Classical Music Studio of St Petersburg or New Classical Orchestra,
as you like it
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Seán
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Post by Seán » Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:27 am

A few weeks ago Ciaran recommended that I consider getting this recording so I did order it. It arrived on Friday and I listened to it yesterday and this morning.

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The first song cycle is Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen it was recorded in 1952. It has DSD backed by Furtwangler/Philharmonia Orchestra. DSD's singing is beautiful. It is interesting to hear the second song, Ging heut morgen ubers feld as it is an integral part of the first mmovement form the First Symphony.

I am not particularly enamoured by singers but to my ear this cycle and the next song cycle, kindertotenlieder with Kempe/BPO are awesome. kindertotenlieder is heart rending music, the entire perfomance is imbued with real emotion. I really love this CD.

I have only listened once to the remaining song cycles.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Seán
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Post by Seán » Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:28 am

A Sunday and a Bach Cantata, No 106 to be precise. This is really new territory for me, the music, performance and recording are gorgeous, it gets a thumbs up from my lovely wife too:

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Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Donaldopato
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Post by Donaldopato » Sun Jun 01, 2008 7:07 am

One of my favorite contemporary composers is on deck for today:

Kalevi Aho Symphony # 12 "Luosto" composed for performance in an outdoor amphitheater in Luosto, Lapland, requiring two orchestras of 120 players total and two wordless voices.

BIS 1676 John Storgards Lahti Symphony Orchestra and Lapland Chamber Orchestra
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moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Sun Jun 01, 2008 9:15 am

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Bruckner: Symphony No. 1
Staatskapelle Dresden
Eugen Jochum, cond.
BRILLIANT (Disc #1 of 10)

The saying "they're all the same, but different" probably holds some validity concerning Bruckner's symphonies. However, if one loves the Brucknerian sound world and general musical architecture, one never tires of hearing its many wonderful and lengthy variations. It's no different with the First as Jochum and the Dresdeners do it full justice.

Debussy: Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune; Images for orchestra; Printemps
Cleveland Orchestra
Pierre Boulez, cond.
DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON

One is immediately impressed with the recording quality here -- vivid, up close and intimate -- combined with precise ensemble playing which allows the various shimmering colors of Debussy's orchestral palette to be clearly delineated. Whether this is how one wants to hear this music is, of course, a personal matter. For these particular pieces, Boulez's "cool & clinical" approach works well enough to present a well-lit canvas, one which allows the active listener to venture unimpeded inside the music to revel in its inventiveness, but which might leave the passive listener emotionally unaffected. Having heard most of Boulez's Debussy, I've concluded that it probably has its place in a collection beside the likes of Martinon, Dutoit, and others; if for no other reason than for the pure sound of it all...and to hear all the notes.
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Sun Jun 01, 2008 3:57 pm

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Shostakovich: Symphony No. 3, "To October
from Shostakovich: Complete Symphonies
Mstislav Rostropovich, LSO (etc.)
Teldec (12-disc)
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piston
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Post by piston » Sun Jun 01, 2008 4:34 pm

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All nine works were recorded in 2004-05, shortly before Schermerhorn's death, which could explain (unfortunately) why the Bachianas Brasileiras number one is conducted by Andrew Mogrelia. My faves are 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8.

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Post by Chalkperson » Sun Jun 01, 2008 7:32 pm

VINCENT PERICHETTI
Complete Piano Sonatas - Geoffrey Burleson
New World Records

CHOPIN - SCRIABIN
Piano Concertos - Heinrich Neighaus
Alexander Gauk - Nikolai Golovanov
Classical Records

KHATCHATURIAN
Piano Concerto - Symphony No.3
Kirill Kondrashin - Moscow Symphony Orchestra
Melodiya

MASCAGANI
Cavaleria Rusticana
Simionato - Di Stefano - Guelfi
Antoninio Votto - La Scala 1955
Myto

BRAHMS
Serenades Nos. 1+2
Istvan Kertesz - LSO
Decca Eloquence

PLEYEL
Wind Serenades
Consortium Classicum
MDG

SIBELIUS
Kullervo
Robert Spano - Atlanta Symphony Orchestara
Telarc

SCHUMAN
The Four Symphonies
Herbert Von Karajan - BSO
DG

JOHANN DAVID HEINICHEN
Dresden Wind Concertos
Fiori Musicali - Barockorchester Bremen
cpo

TCHAIKOVSKY
Symphonies 4+5+6 - 1812 - March Slave etc
Gennadi Rozdestvensky - LSO
Regis
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piston
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Post by piston » Sun Jun 01, 2008 7:56 pm

Very busy week-end, Chalkie. :D
I think you meant Schumann. Your typo reminded me of the constant frustration I had (can't use the present tense anymore) at Border's trying to find music by William Schuman and Boris Tchaikovsky amid the multitude of Schumanns and Tchaikovskys....

Seán
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Post by Seán » Mon Jun 02, 2008 5:50 am

My exploration of symphonic music continues with a box set that I bought recently of the complete set of Mendelssohn Symphonies and Overtures. It’s on the DG label in the Collector Edition series. This features the LSO conducted by Abbado, it was recorded in the mid-eighties.
This weekend I have listened to the First Symphony several times. I know very little about Mendelssohn’s music and was surprised to see that the First was only his eleventh published work he was, therefore, very young when he wrote it.
The First in my opinion is full of exuberant joy and is a delight from start to finish. I don’t know if Abbado’s treatment is well thought of, to me this is splendid music.

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Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Mon Jun 02, 2008 8:14 am

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Bruckner: Symphony No. 7
Radio Symphony Orchestra of Berlin
Riccardo Chailly, cond.
London

This was my third or fourth exposure to a Bruckner symphony back when this was originally released in the mid-'80s to much critical acclaim. It's certainly more expansive than Klemperer/Philharmonia's Seventh on EMI, my earlier introduction to the work, and has a wonderful sense of balance in both structure and execution. Tempos aren't allowed to veer to seeming extremes from a generally deliberate and wholly satisfying median. Harmonies and counterpoints are melded well to make for a lucid, firmly organic musical journey that neither sags nor shockingly stampedes. The second movement Adagio, in my opinion the heart of this work, is sublimely rendered. The third movement Scherzo swells and ebbs with firm intensity; dynamic climaxes convey appropriate drama and sonic heft. The digital recording is bright, vivid, spacious, and not at all glary. Was I "moved" by this performance? Yes, I was.
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Mon Jun 02, 2008 8:17 am

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Schumann: Violin Sonatas
Isabelle Faust, vn; Silke Avenhaus, pf
SWR
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Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Tue Jun 03, 2008 1:19 am

Mozart Piano Concerto #15 (Foldes/Bigot)
Rimsky's Antar Symphony (Ansermet)
Liszt's Les Preludes (Argenta)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Ken
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Post by Ken » Tue Jun 03, 2008 6:55 am

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Schumann: Piano Quintet, Andante and Variations, Fantasiestücke Op.73, Märchenbilder
Martha Argerich "and Friends"
EMI

This is surely my favourite performance of the Schumann Quintet. I enjoy the pensive yet youthful approach that Argerich and her all-star ensemble take to the work. The sound quality is spectacular -- a fact all the more impressive (along with the absence of missed notes) owing to the fact that this is a live recording. Recorded in the Concertgebouw, the hall's famous resonance is evident even in the playing of this collection of chamber works.
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

Ken
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Post by Ken » Tue Jun 03, 2008 11:51 am

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Brahms: Piano Concerto No.2; Beethoven: Piano Sonata No.23
Sviatoslav Richter
Erich Leinsdorf/Chicago Symphony Orchestra
RCA

"...The one where Richter makes late Brahms sound like early Schumann." ;)
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

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Post by Chalkperson » Tue Jun 03, 2008 12:51 pm

HAYDN - The Last Seven Words
Borodin Quartet
Melodiya

BORODIN - String Quartets Nos. 1+2
Borodin Quartet
Melodiya

HAYDN - PIano Trios
The Moscow Trio
Vista Vera
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Tue Jun 03, 2008 2:29 pm

^ I wholly approve of your second choice. ;)
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

piston
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Post by piston » Thu Jun 05, 2008 12:14 pm

Florent Schmitt:
Psaume XLVII
Suite sans esprit de suite
La tragédie de Salomé
Hyperion

Voices of Light
Dawn Upshaw sings the music of Messiaen, Debussy, Golijov, Fauré.
(Includes Chansons de Bilitis, La Chanson d'Eve, etc.)
Gilbert Kalish, piano
Nonesuch

Gian Francesco Malipiero:
Symphony no. 5, "Concertante in Eco."
Symphony no. 6, "Degli Archi."
Symphony no. 8, "Symphonia Brevis."
Symphony no. 11, "Della Cornamuse."
Marco Polo

also
Malipiero: Concerto for violin and orchestra, Andre Gertler, violin, Prague Symphony Orchestra, Vaclav Smetacek, Supraphon.

GK
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Post by GK » Thu Jun 05, 2008 1:35 pm

DVD Tosca at Verona with Fiorenza Cedonis, Marcello Alverez, and Ruggero Raimondi in the leads with Daniel Oren conducting. On a bi-monthly basis the Italian club in our senior development presents an opera DVD. The man in charge prefers videos of actual performances to films. On this criterion this is an excellent DVD.

TopoGigio

Post by TopoGigio » Thu Jun 05, 2008 2:23 pm

Lyapunov...Twelve Trascendental Studies op11 (Pearl SHE 9624)
I have to work the 11th Study,Ronde des Sylphes, I will enlarge it to
two hours for Wallingford dedication...Image

(the 12th is dedicated to Liszt)

I have not cover...unknown pianist for me! Searching...
Malcolm Binns!

Barry
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Post by Barry » Thu Jun 05, 2008 2:44 pm

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I've read many raves about Krips LSO Schubert 9th, but this was the first time I had the chance to listen to it. Its reputation is justified. Krips draws such an old-world, big sound from the LSO and his tempos are so-well chosen most of the time. I might place it just slightly behind the Furtwangler '42 live BPO and the Szell/Cleveland/Sony, but it's certainly in the top tier of recordings of this "Great" symphony.

I only listened to the first movement of the Unfinished with the VPO that fills out the disc, as it was late and I was tired, but again, it was in elite company as far as recordings I've heard of that movement.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

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Seán
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Post by Seán » Thu Jun 05, 2008 3:20 pm

This afternoon I visited Tower Records and came away with two CDS. I listened to both of them this evening:

The first one is on Brilliant Classics:

Mahler
Symphony No 5
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Václav Neumann


This is a good performance but not in the Bertini class in my opinion.


The second set is Smetana's Complete Orchestral works by the Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Theodore Kuchar. Again this is on the Brilliant Classics label, it is a 3 CD set:

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Thus far I have only listened to excerpts of Ma Vlast and it is a very good performance, not in the Kubelik class but very enjoyable all the same.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Seán
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Post by Seán » Thu Jun 05, 2008 3:22 pm

Barry wrote:Image

I've read many raves about Krips LSO Schubert 9th, but this was the first time I had the chance to listen to it. Its reputation is justified.
The Krips LSO Schubert Ninth is on my - mental - list, thanks for reminding me. :wink:
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

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Post by Chalkperson » Thu Jun 05, 2008 3:59 pm

Seán wrote:This afternoon I visited Tower Records and came away with two CDS. I listened to both of them this evening:

The first one is on Brilliant Classics:

Mahler
Symphony No 5
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Václav Neumann


This is a good performance but not in the Bertini class in my opinion.


The second set is Smetana's Complete Orchestral works by the Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Theodore Kuchar. Again this is on the Brilliant Classics label, it is a 3 CD set:

Image

Thus far I have only listened to excerpts of Ma Vlast and it is a very good performance, not in the Kubelik class but very enjoyable all the same.
The two greatest Czech Conductors are Vaclav Talich and Karel Ancerl...if you find any of their cd's it's always a good performance...
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Post by Chalkperson » Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:00 pm

Removed because of Triple Post... :oops:
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Post by Chalkperson » Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:01 pm

Removed because of Triple Post... :oops: :oops:
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moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Sat Jun 07, 2008 7:22 am

Image Image Image
Ravel: Ma Mère l'Oye (complete); Une Barque sur l'océan; Alborada del Gracioso; Rapsodie espagnole; Boléro
Berlin Philharmonic
Pierre Boulez, cond.
DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON

Again, scrupulously performed and beautifully recorded -- all i's dotted and t's crossed as one has never heard before. Ravel's copyist would be proud.

Sibelius: Pohjola's Daughter; Symphony No. 4; Finlandia
Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra
The Polytech Male Choir (on Finlandia)
Leif Segerstam, cond.
ONDINE

An interesting program opening with an expansive and heartfelt Pohjola's Daughter that actually manages to elicit a slight grin as it progresses from its morose beginnings. The incredibly austere Symphony No. 4 is performed as soberly as I've ever heard; its slightest hint of "gladness" manifested in the third movement is never allowed to exceed the bounds of a concept formed of severe propriety. This being no exception, I continue to find each performance of this symphony interesting in its own way. The Finlandia here includes a portion with male choir -- first I've heard it. Otherwise, I find it dutifully, but comparatively dully performed.

Sibelius: Symphony No. 5
Vienna Philharmonic
Leonard Bernstein, cond.
DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON (3-CD boxset)

I'm really beginning to love this performance of the popular Fifth Symphony. Yes, Bernstein does invoke some of his "Indian summer" mannerisms, but here it works to very fine effect!
"Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time."
- Steve Wright

Chalkperson
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Post by Chalkperson » Sat Jun 07, 2008 12:01 pm

Seán wrote:
Barry wrote:Image

I've read many raves about Krips LSO Schubert 9th, but this was the first time I had the chance to listen to it. Its reputation is justified.
The Krips LSO Schubert Ninth is on my - mental - list, thanks for reminding me. :wink:
Me too, I don't have that either...
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:40 pm

In one of those whimsical spending decisions that tend to pop up so frequently on warm, early summer days, I just picked up the following:

Image
Berg and Stravinsky: Violin Concertos
Itzakh Perlman
Seiji Ozawa, Boston Symphony Orchestra
DG

It was a toss-up (literally -- I flipped a coin) to decide whether I'd pick up this disc or the new Hilary Hahn Schoenberg/Sibelius VC recording. Surprisingly, I hadn't heard the Berg concerto before, and I'm glad my coin landed on 'heads', because I enjoy it tremendously. There's some sublime pizzicato in there!
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

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Post by Chalkperson » Sat Jun 07, 2008 4:34 pm

keninottawa wrote:In one of those whimsical spending decisions that tend to pop up so frequently on warm, early summer days, I just picked up the following:

Image
Berg and Stravinsky: Violin Concertos
Itzakh Perlman
Seiji Ozawa, Boston Symphony Orchestra
DG

It was a toss-up (literally -- I flipped a coin) to decide whether I'd pick up this disc or the new Hilary Hahn Schoenberg/Sibelius VC recording. Surprisingly, I hadn't heard the Berg concerto before, and I'm glad my coin landed on 'heads', because I enjoy it tremendously. There's some sublime pizzicato in there!
The coin should have landed on it's edge, The Berg is a great work but the Hahn dics is also first rate..next week you can buy it.... :wink:
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Sat Jun 07, 2008 4:44 pm

^ At this rate, I soon won't have many coins left to flip! :(
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Sat Jun 07, 2008 8:42 pm

Schumann's Second.....in Mahler's emasculation (Ceccato)
Mussorgsky's original Night On Bald Mountain (Kitayenko)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

moldyoldie
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Post by moldyoldie » Sun Jun 08, 2008 7:33 am

Image Image
Schumann: Symphony No. 4 (1851 rev.)
Vienna Philharmonic
Riccardo Muti, cond.
PHILIPS (complete symphonies)

I'm going to go out on a limb and state that this performance of the Schumann Fourth sounds more completely "right" than any of the several I've heard thus far. No, I haven't heard the famous Furtwängler nor the Karajan, and no, it isn't perfect in my mind's ear, but I'll be darned if Muti doesn't hit the "big moments" just as they're meant to be heard and still make the symphony cohere beautifully as a unified whole, bringing it all home in very fine fashion. Certain tempos could be a bit more lively, in my opinion, but the tempo change-ups and transitions between sections work marvelously in what I would describe as this semi-Romanticized, big-boned performance.

Tubin: Sinfonietta on Estonian Motifs
Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi, cond.
BIS (inc. two other works)

I discovered the music of Estonian composer Eduard Tubin when this series of recordings from fellow countryman Neeme Järvi on the BIS label was first released sometime in the early '90s. For the most part, Tubin is very accessible and quite tuneful with an idiom seemingly borne of twentieth century romanticism a la Copland and Barber, but which borrows heavily from Estonian folk melodies and rhythms. The Sinfonietta on Estonian Motifs, written when the composer was 35, is a delightful example of his working of a simple theme with colorful harmonies and features pensive soloing from violin and horn.
"Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time."
- Steve Wright

Seán
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Post by Seán » Sun Jun 08, 2008 5:41 pm

I listened to the Fourth Symphony a few times today. It is rich in drama and to my ear is beautifully played by the Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra, which now has me curious about the San Francisco Orchestra's recording of Nielsen's symphonies.

Image
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Ken
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Post by Ken » Mon Jun 09, 2008 1:20 pm

Well, I caved over lunch break and made another impulsive spending decision:

Image
Schoenberg, Sibelius: Violin Concertos
Hilary Hahn
Esa Pekka-Salonen, Swedish RSO
DG

I enjoy what I hear so far, but will have to report back later with my final verdict.
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

Ken
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Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 6:17 am
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Post by Ken » Mon Jun 09, 2008 5:43 pm

An update about the Hahn disc: I've now listened to the recording twice through, and have some initial thoughts that I wish to share.

While her recording of the Schoenberg concerto is extremely agile and, from what I can hear, in the good spirit of the Second Viennese School, I am not yet sold on her Sibelius. I find her approach to the first two movements perhaps a bit too pensive, and that she doesn't achieve the same dynamic range that I've heard elsewhere and come to enjoy in the concerto. Maybe it's the sound engineering, or maybe I haven't given it a close enough hearing.

The disc is, nevertheless, very good.
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

lmpower
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Post by lmpower » Mon Jun 09, 2008 10:21 pm

Today I listened to Beethoven's triple concerto with Oistrakh, Rostropovich, Richter and Karajan. This was composed about the time of the Eroica and Apassionata, and deserves more hearings except for the difficulty in getting the required soloists together. It was featured on one of the first live concerts I attended with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Alfred Wallenstein.

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