What Got You Interested in Art Music?

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

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dulcinea
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What Got You Interested in Art Music?

Post by dulcinea » Mon Apr 23, 2007 10:05 am

:D A neighbor lady played recordings of waltzes such as VIENNA WOODS, which I'm listening right now. For a while I only liked fast music, but with patience and perseverance I learned to enjoy slow music such as the very eloquent and very moving Adagio of Bruckner's Sixth.
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Barry
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Post by Barry » Mon Apr 23, 2007 10:16 am

I took a music appreciation class in college. That was the start for me. For extra credit, I went to an all-Beethoven Philadelphia Orchestra concert and wrote about the experience. I was sucked in pretty quickly.
Last edited by Barry on Mon Apr 23, 2007 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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IcedNote
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Post by IcedNote » Mon Apr 23, 2007 1:48 pm

My parents started me on piano at the age of five. It's been a long road since!

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Post by jbuck919 » Mon Apr 23, 2007 2:57 pm

I was for all intents and purposes born to it.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Mon Apr 23, 2007 3:17 pm

What's "Art Music"? I thought that was Lieder.
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jbuck919
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Post by jbuck919 » Mon Apr 23, 2007 3:19 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:What's "Art Music"? I thought that was Lieder.
We can't define it but we know it when we hear it. :)

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Barry
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Post by Barry » Mon Apr 23, 2007 3:29 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:What's "Art Music"? I thought that was Lieder.
Based on the post that started the thread, I took it to just be another general term for what we usually call "classical" music.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

jbuck919
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Post by jbuck919 » Mon Apr 23, 2007 4:07 pm

Barry Z wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:What's "Art Music"? I thought that was Lieder.
Based on the post that started the thread, I took it to just be another general term for what we usually call "classical" music.
Beyond a doubt, Barry, but it does beg the question.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Mon Apr 23, 2007 6:19 pm

Punk rock. By the time I grew out of it, no pop/rock form hadn't been roundly trashed or discombobulated in my listening. Which is one reason I don't listen to much 20th C Art Music: if I want to listen to folk going crazy/ballistic (or delicate) with chainsaws, shopping carts, angle-grinders, screams, pulse loops, random electronic noises and such I'll listen to Einsturzende Neubauten. :wink:

Nowhere to go but classical, in my mind. I started listening to a few pieces here and there, and began noticing pieces in movies as well. Then one day I visited Jenolan Caves outside Sydney. They used to (don't know if they do now or not) have concerts and musicians play there regularly - a fact I was unaware of as I was guiding my tourist friend about the glories of the deep when the entire mountain began to resonate to Bach's first cello suite (a piece I knew from The Hunger, not by name then). The sound through the coloured stone and echoing through cavernous marvels left one spinning.

A mountain singing Bach can convince just about anyone, IMHO (OK, perhaps not Corlyss). For me it was one of those moments in life that I either cannot forget or contually embelish it was so extraordinary.

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Post by some guy » Mon Apr 23, 2007 9:32 pm

Rusty in Orchestraville and Sparky's Magic Piano plus a few other odds and ends, like sides one and four of Peter and the Wolf (These were all 78s, yes) and some snippets discs, with one to three minute bits of Beethoven and Haydn and Grieg and Tchaikovsy, et cetera. I had only heard T.V. music up to that point, and the odd minute with Ray Conniff or Percy Faith on the rare occasions when my folks put music on the hi-fi.

A musical family this was not, but something about those classical pieces (or bits of pieces) really struck me as satisfying. More modulating, I guess--tv music didn't do much of that. More variety generally: more instruments, more development (though I knew nothing of modulation or development at the time, of course, not by name anyway.).

No music in school, either, until a "music appreciation" class in seventh grade (seventh!) which included all the things I'd already ferreted out on my own. That's when I first learned that cool kids will suck up to you around test time... :shock:
"The public has got to stay in touch with the music of its time . . . for otherwise people will gradually come to mistrust music claimed to be the best."
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Gregg
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Post by Gregg » Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:53 am

Seeing a repeat of Lost in Space in the 70s. There was a particularly awful episode with a space Valkure, and whenever she appeared the Ride was on the soundtrack. I never did get it out of my head. By the time I started high school I found out what it was and started down the long dark path of art music.

Now that I think about it, I wonder if my appreciation for jazz (particularly early jazz) was stimulated by the "jazzy" sound tracks of the Laurel and Hardy and Our Gang shorts I saw on TV?

By the way I like the term art music, I wish it was not so laden with culture and status associations, but what can you do?


Gregg

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Post by MaestroDJS » Tue Apr 24, 2007 10:43 am

As a boy, I was only dimly aware of classical music. In 1968 Mason Williams scored a hit with his Classical Gas, which of course isn't really classical, but its purely instrumental format and its use of an orchestra were quite an ear-opener for my young mind. That led me to explore more music in orchestral guise, which in turn led to my ongoing explorations of the length and breadth of the classical music literature, and so I'll always have a fondness for Classical Gas. Another turning point for me was the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey that same year. Those images of spacecraft in a ballet of sorts, accompanied by a Johann Strauss II waltz, were awesome. That made me begin to dabble in classical music, but the clincher came from a different direction.

Much as I began to enjoy the popular classics, I really had little idea what went on under the many intricate layers of music. Help came from a most unexpected source: "New Horizons in Music Appreciation", a comedy sketch in which Professor Peter Schickele delivers a play-by-play commentary of a performance of Beethoven's 5th Symphony as if it were a broadcast sporting event. Not only is it funny ("He's playing a cadenza! He's out of his mind! He thinks it’s an oboe concerto!"), it is also more informative any book or teacher I had before then ("I get the feeling we are going to hear a lot of that four-note motif, Bob."). This comedy from the "discoverer" of P.D.Q. Bach opened a door for me because it showed this symphony to be an incredibly exciting work of genius. Afterward, I learned to appreciate countless other musical masterpieces, because I had a better idea of what to listen for.
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johnQpublic
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Post by johnQpublic » Tue Apr 24, 2007 11:17 am

some guy wrote:Rusty in Orchestraville
Very interesting....I'll get to that in a moment

First, my room as an infant through early childhood shared a wall with a next door neighbor (Philadelphia row houses). That essentially means you'll hear some sounds from next door.

The neighbor's son practiced classical piano for many hours a day eventually heading to Julliard where he went on to produce most RCA Classical albums in the 1960's (Peter Delheim). Anyway, I guess all those soft tones got into my bones.

That plus my "Rusty in Orchestraville" and "Tubby the Tuba" records that I played over & over & over.
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Post by living_stradivarius » Tue Apr 24, 2007 4:52 pm

Television commercials in my toddler years.
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Barry
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Post by Barry » Tue Apr 24, 2007 6:07 pm

johnQpublic wrote: First, my room as an infant through early childhood shared a wall with a next door neighbor (Philadelphia row houses). That essentially means you'll hear some sounds from next door.
You really get to know a lot about the neighbors in those row homes. My parents both grew up in them, also in Philly. I spent a lot of time at the one my mother lived in visiting the grandparents when I was a kid. It was well known in the family that the son in the family next door had atrocious table manners while eating. It was very easy to see across to the neighbor's kitchen.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

anasazi
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Post by anasazi » Wed Apr 25, 2007 12:21 am

Like IcedNote, I began piano lessons about age 5. But it was my idea not my parents. Although there was a time later on when they had to tell me to either practise or forget about future lessons! '-)

The lessons eventually led naturally to contact with music by composers like Chopin (naturally) and then one thing led to another.
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Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Wed Apr 25, 2007 2:11 am

My mother gave me a recording of Strauss' "Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche" when I was three. Later, I got Rachmaninoff's 2nd Piano Concerto and Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf". When I turned four, she had to replace the worn-out Strauss work. It was my favorite of all.

When I was eight or so, I fell in love with the "Flash Gordon" music (from the serials, of course!). It was years before I found out Liszt composed some of it, other pieces were by Franz Waxman and Heinz Roemheld.

Tschüß!
Jack
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