Modern Music Masterpieces

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ichiro
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Modern Music Masterpieces

Post by ichiro » Mon May 14, 2007 4:38 pm

I am very knew to Modern Music (say 1940-), and would like to know what are the established "big " (not in terms of scale, but in terms of quality) pieces by musicolgists ect. I know this is a tough and debatable question, and the answers vary, but if you could maybe list 10 standard pieces to get me going, please respond.


PS No shostakovich or prokofiev please, i know much of their work already!

hangos
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modern music masterpieces

Post by hangos » Mon May 14, 2007 4:52 pm

Obviously this list is by no means definitive, but it's what I would suggest from my own experience
In no particular order, and omitting Shostakovich and Prokofiev ;
All written after 1940 -

Lutoslawski Concerto for Orchestra
Bartok Concerto for Orchestra
Lutoslawski Cello Concerto
Ligeti String Quartet no.1
Reich Variations for Orchestra
Ligeti String Quartet no.2
Dutilleux Cello Concerto "tout un monde lointain"
Dutilleux String Quartet "ainsi la nuit"
Ligeti piano etudes


My knowledge of post 1940 music is fairly limited - these are the works I particularly enjoy.
Paradoxically, Bartok's earlier works (Quartets 3,4,5 and Music for Strings, percussion and celesta, not to mention Miraculous Mandarin and the first 2 piano concertos,all sound more "modern" than the 1943 Concerto for Orchestra although they date from 1919 - 1936 !

BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Mon May 14, 2007 5:06 pm

All of the above plus

Carter: Concerto for Orchestra, 3rd SQ, Piano Concerto, Night Fantasies
Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps, Chronochromie
Boulez: Marteau sans Maitre, Pli Selon Pli
Riley: In C
Reich: Music for Eighteen Instruments
Wolpe: Piece for Two Instrumental Units, Piece for Trumpet and Seven Instruments
Ferneyhough: La Chute d'Icare
Stravinsky: Agon, Movements for Piano and Orchestra
Britten: Nocturnal
Takemitsu: All in Twilight, A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Garden

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Post by some guy » Mon May 14, 2007 9:06 pm

Hangos, you might be being a bit too modest. You've got a very respectable list, there. Lutoslawski's Cello Concerto, BE FAIR. Why, that's probably the greatest cello concerto ever.

And a hearty amen for BWV 1080's additions.

Ichiro may regret posting this question, as here comes another 10. (I once overheard a bassoonist saying, in mock jest, "There was no good music composed before 1945," so I'll start after then for this list:

John Cage: Atlas Eclipticalis
Helmut Lachenmann: Gran Torso
Alvin Lucier: I am sitting in a room
Gordon Mumma: Hornpipe
LaMonte Young: Draw a straight line and follow it
Pauline Oliveros: anything with her Deep Listening Band
Witold Lutoslawski, Livre pour Orchestra
Francis Dhomont, Forêt profonde
Luc Ferrari, Presque rien no. 1 (though all of them are good)
Edgard Varese: Poeme electronique

(Ten is too few. Thirty is too few. Three hundred is too few. You really should have asked for the top one thousand. Would have been less wrenching for me to do that one.)
"The public has got to stay in touch with the music of its time . . . for otherwise people will gradually come to mistrust music claimed to be the best."
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Confusion is a word we have invented for an order which is not understood.
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Post by Chalkperson » Mon May 14, 2007 9:24 pm

some guy wrote: (Ten is too few. Thirty is too few. Three hundred is too few. You really should have asked for the top one thousand. Would have been less wrenching for me to do that one.)
Ok then, here's another ten

Morton Feldman - Piano and String Quartet or just about anything on Hat Hut Art
Morton Lauridson - Lux Etairna - any choral discs
Frank Martin - Mass for Double Choir - Symphonie Concertante
Liugi Dallapiccola - Tartiniana - Due Pezzi etc Chandos
Giya Kancheli - Lament or just about anything on ECM
Weinberg - Symphonies on Chandos
Gorecki - Symphony No3 (no sneering)
Peteris Vasks - Symphony No3
Sofia Gubadulina - Canticle for the Sun
Saariaho - Cinq Reflets de L'Amour de Loin

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Post by Jack Kelso » Tue May 15, 2007 12:51 am

Hey! How informed are these posters? Not including Hindemith on a listing of modern masters is like eliminating Brahms from 19th-century masters: he's one of the most important.

How about:

Symphony in E-Flat (1940)
Symphonic Metamorphoses
Horn Concerto in E-Flat
"Sinfonia Serena" and a host of fine chamber music.....

....not to mention "Mathis der Maler" (1934), but that was earlier---and I believe the author of this thread wants the cutoff at 1940.

Tschüß!
Jack
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Post by Chalkperson » Tue May 15, 2007 1:00 am

Jack Kelso wrote:Hey! How informed are these posters? Not including Hindemith on a listing of modern masters is like eliminating Brahms from 19th-century masters: he's one of the most important.Jack
Hate to tell you this Jack, but, I did eliminate Brahms from my list of the Top Twenty Composers, and nominated Morton Feldman instead...but hey, Corlyss says I don't like Raw and Sexy Early Music, so what do I know :wink:

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Post by Jack Kelso » Tue May 15, 2007 1:58 am

Chalkperson wrote:
Jack Kelso wrote:Hey! How informed are these posters? Not including Hindemith on a listing of modern masters is like eliminating Brahms from 19th-century masters: he's one of the most important.Jack
Hate to tell you this Jack, but, I did eliminate Brahms from my list of the Top Twenty Composers, and nominated Morton Feldman instead...but hey, Corlyss says I don't like Raw and Sexy Early Music, so what do I know :wink:
Okay---but that doesn't mean Brahms and Hindemith are not important composers in the development of 19th- and 20th-century music. Other folks may desire their music.

Jack
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Post by John F » Tue May 15, 2007 3:07 am

First of all, the dates. 1940 is way too late for the beginning of what's called the Modern Period, and a bit too early for what's conventionally called "contemporary," which is taken to start after World War II, possibly in 1950.

Also, the birth years of the composers are often more significant in placing them than the dates of compositions. Stravinsky was certainly one of the great Modern composers, but though he continued writing music after 1940--important music, including the Symphony in 3 Movements and "The Rake's Progress"--I don't believe these were ever labeled "contemporary" music, and they certainly aren't now.

Of the composers whose main career peaked after World War II, the best known include Benjamin Britten and Michael Tippett in England; Carter and Cage in America; Messiaen and Boulez in France; Henze and Stockhausen in Germany; Schnittke in Russia, and Penderecki in Poland. There are many other recognizable names in these and other countries, and many fine pieces by composers you never heard of, but this will do as a start.

Choosing some works by these composers, here's a list:

Britten - "Peter Grimes," War Requiem
Tippett - "The Midsummer Marriage"
Carter - Concerto for Orchestra
Cage - 4' 33" <grin>
Messiaen - Turangalila Symphony
Boulez - Le Marteau sans Maître
Henze - "Der junge Lord"
Stockhausen - Klavierstücke, Gesang der Jünglinge
Schnittke - Faust cantata, Viola concerto
Penderecki - Violin concerto, Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima

You asked for established, standard pieces, and most of these have been widely performed and written about, some more than others. Even Stockhausen's Klavierstücke, some if not all of them, have appeared in recitals by Maurizio Pollini and even Shura Cherkassky. And I've performed 4' 33" myself. <ducking>
John Francis

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Post by Chalkperson » Tue May 15, 2007 9:08 am

Jack Kelso "Okay---but that doesn't mean Brahms and Hindemith are not important composers in the development of 19th- and 20th-century music. Other folks may desire their music. Jack
Correct, although I was also trying to reccomend music by Composers other than those already reccomended, and I was dealing with the late 20th Century Composers, I genuinly am nonplusssed by Brahms, and I have tried Hindemith many times and it is just don't know what the fuss is all about...
but hey, Corlyss says I don't like Raw and Sexy Early Music, so what do I know...
I say this because on things I don't like I certainly feel like i'm in the minority... :wink:

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Post by Joe Barron » Tue May 15, 2007 9:50 am

Some very nice stuff listed here. BWV beat me to my Carter and Wolpe recommendations, though I would say Mr. Carter's Cello Concerto (2001) would rival Lutoslawski. :wink:

I would add Music For a Summer Evening by George Crumb, Time's Encomium by Charles Wuorinen (strange no one else has brought up electronic music), the Sonatas and Interludes for prepared piano by Cage (his best stuff), and just for loveliness' sake, the songs of Ned Rorem.

Everyone mentioned on this thread is pretty old. There's a lot of music being written by younger composers whom I haven't had time to discover.

hangos
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modern masterpieces - cello concerto champions

Post by hangos » Tue May 15, 2007 10:05 am

I know three "modern" cello concertos ; Lutoslawski, Ligeti and Dutilleux.Which is the greatest of the three? I like them all.The Dutilleux is rhapsodic and beautiful, the Lutoslawski tough and combative, the Ligeti very serious and innig, but I can't judge which is the champion.
Any offers on this three-ring circus? :?:

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Re: modern masterpieces - cello concerto champions

Post by Chalkperson » Tue May 15, 2007 11:57 am

hangos wrote:I know three "modern" cello concertos ; Lutoslawski, Ligeti and Dutilleux.Which is the greatest of the three? I like them all.The Dutilleux is rhapsodic and beautiful, the Lutoslawski tough and combative, the Ligeti very serious and innig, but I can't judge which is the champion.
Any offers on this three-ring circus? :?:
If I could only have one of those Concertos, I think I would have to pick Dutilleux, but it's a very tough choice...

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Post by some guy » Wed May 16, 2007 12:43 am

Joe,

Six of my ten are electronic (or electroacoustic) pieces. I'd say that qualifies as "bringing up"!

We've got lists of the older peeps 'cause ichiro asked for big and established....

You want some younger folk, I can oblige:

Brandon LaBelle
Christina Kubisch
Lionel Marchetti
Jerome Noetinger
Roxanne Turcotte
Robert Normandeau
Christian Calon
Ana-Maria Avram
Jean-luc Guionnet
Natasha Barrett
Peter Karman

And of course, the people who work under other names, like the two Finnish guys called Pan sonic and the Masami Akita, who works as Merzbow.

That's a pitifully short list, I hope you know! But most of them are electronic or electroacoustic people. It's all good fun, so enjoy!
"The public has got to stay in touch with the music of its time . . . for otherwise people will gradually come to mistrust music claimed to be the best."
--Viennese critic (1843)

Confusion is a word we have invented for an order which is not understood.
--Henry Miller

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Post by jbuck919 » Wed May 16, 2007 12:53 am

I think that much worthwhile listening to which I might if I added a little ambition to my repertory of sterling characteristics :) has been mentioned here.

However, I do feel constrained to point out that true [post]-modern music cannot include works of Stravinsky, Bartok, or any of the generation who made modern music in the technical sense (which as in visual art is no longer modern in the colloquial sense) what it was. Nineteen-forty is an arbitrary cutoff and the fact that several canonical composers of the modern period had the nerve to die after that date does not change the fact that they. not the calendar, define the period. The only possible exception I can think of is Shostakovich, and in art, there is always an exception.

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val
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Post by val » Wed May 16, 2007 5:57 am

Just some of my preferred works, composed after 1950:

BOULEZ: Pli selon Pli

ZIMMERMANN: Die Soldaten, opera

FRANK MARTIN: Cello Concerto

LIGETI: Lux Aeterna, Requiem, First string Quartet

PENDERECKI: Utrenja

NONO: Il Canto Sospeso

BERIO: Coro

DUTILLEUX: String Quartet "Ainsi la nuit"

MESSIAEN: Quartet "Pour la fin des temps"

BUSSOTTI: Bergkristal

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Post by karlhenning » Wed May 16, 2007 7:45 am

Jack Kelso wrote:Hey! How informed are these posters? Not including Hindemith on a listing of modern masters
Very informed, Jack; Hindemith is already historical.

A great and important composer; but, no longer "modern."

"Modern" doesn't stand still.

Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by karlhenning » Wed May 16, 2007 7:46 am

Carter, Double Concerto for harpsichord, piano and two chamber orchestras
Ligeti, Atmosphères
Boulez, Pli selon pli
Stravinsky, Requiem Canticles
Feldman, Why Patterns?
Wuorinen, Mass for the Restoration of St Luke’s
Pärt, Fratres
Moody, Akáthistos Hymn
Harvey, Mortuos plango, vivos voco
Piazzolla, Las estaciones porteñas


Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by Joe Barron » Wed May 16, 2007 10:00 am

some guy wrote:Joe,

Six of my ten are electronic (or electroacoustic) pieces. I'd say that qualifies as "bringing up"
Well, you must keep in mind that I'm an idiot.

Anyway, lists like this always remind me that no matter how long and hard I listen to anything, I'm still very ignorant of everything that's going on. There are people and things here I have never heard of. I guess some of us --- ie., I --- get settled as we grow older and fail to keep exploring.

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Post by karlhenning » Wed May 16, 2007 10:28 am

Joe Barron wrote:Anyway, lists like this always remind me that no matter how long and hard I listen to anything, I'm still very ignorant of everything that's going on. There are people and things here I have never heard of. I guess some of us --- ie., I --- get settled as we grow older and fail to keep exploring.
There's also an inherent contradiction (or near-contradiction) in the OP's request . . . he calls for a list of new works, but also qualifies it with established "big" pieces. Establishment, and the determination of what is "big," generally takes time.

Cheers,
~Karl
Last edited by karlhenning on Wed May 16, 2007 10:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by mickey » Wed May 16, 2007 10:28 am

Some mentioned previously, some not...

Dutilleux: Cello Concerto
Reilly: Cadenza on The Night Plain, In C
Adams: Dharma at Big Sur, Harmonielehre
Messiaen: Turangalila, Les Offrandes Ouibles, Hymne
Lutoslawski: Cello Concerto
Rautavaara: Cantus Arcticus
Takemitsu: A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Garden

and something new and not established but i highly enjoyed
Lee III: Beyond Rivers of Vision (Premiered 2006 with the NSO, i don't think its been recorded)
http://callmeclassical.blogspot.com

My Favorites:
Shostakovich: Cello Concerto || Adams: Harmonelehre || Dutilleux: Symphony No2 "Le Double" | Part: Cantus in Memorium of Benjamin Britten

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Post by slofstra » Wed May 16, 2007 11:13 am

Adams: Short Ride in a Fast Machine, Shaker Loops
Andriessen: De Snelheid
Barber: String Quartet
Glass: String Quartets
Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorpheses on a theme by von Weber
Lutoslawski: Livre pour Orchestra
Maxwell Davies: Orkney Wedding with Sunrise
Part: Kanon Pakajanen
Rutter: Requiem
Tubin: Symphony No. 3
Vaughan Williams: Dona Nobis Pacem

Mischa
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Post by Mischa » Wed May 16, 2007 11:31 am

Hi Ichiro,

besides the already mentioned:

B. A. Zimmermann: Requiem für einen jungen Dichter
A. Schnittke: Concerti grossi
A. Pärt: Cantus in memoriam Benjamin Britten (Track 16)
J. Zorn :P
C. Ives: The unanswered Question
M. Feldman: Coptic Light
H. Dutilleux: Concerto for violin and orchestra - L'arbre des songes
K. A. Hartmann: Concerto funébre (ok, written 1939, but this concert is breathtaking, the 4th movement Choral is one of the saddest pieces written in the XX. century IMO)
Lera Auerbach: maybe wrong in the area "Modern Music Masterpieces"-section, but I played some violin-pieces and the string quartet recently: listen to it once in the listening section of her site (recording with Tokyo String Quartet)

Btw, ubu.com is a great ressource for videos, documentations and mp3's of the minimalistic/electronic musical field.

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Post by Chalkperson » Wed May 16, 2007 12:15 pm

Mischa wrote:J. Zorn :P
Who he?..or is it She?

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Post by Joe Barron » Wed May 16, 2007 12:25 pm

John Zorn, postmodern composer who enjoys throwing all sorts of material together in short bursts. His greatest influence is probably Carl Stalling, who wrote music for Bugs Bunny.

Gee! I just remembered. If you want to explore modern American music before laying out cash for CDs, log on to artofthestates.org. They have hundreds of pieces you can play for free.

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Post by Mischa » Wed May 16, 2007 12:38 pm

Joe is right: I was on some of his concerts on jazz-festivals, his music is an excellent chance for an headache, but somehow I like it. Today John Zorn is more famous for his Jazz, but he started as a modern composer. The Kronos quartet recorded some of his pieces (like Forbidden Fruit), the usual Zorn sounds like Spillane (track 1) or like this. But the Kronos-recordings are really great.

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Post by Jack Kelso » Thu May 17, 2007 12:29 am

karlhenning wrote:
Jack Kelso wrote:Hey! How informed are these posters? Not including Hindemith on a listing of modern masters
Very informed, Jack; Hindemith is already historical.

A great and important composer; but, no longer "modern."

"Modern" doesn't stand still.

Cheers,
~Karl
You're right, Karl. But Hindemith lived almost 25 years beyond the arbitrary cutoff date (1940) for this thread. Thus, he should be included in recommendations.

Tschüß!
Jack
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BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Thu May 17, 2007 10:07 am

Jack Kelso wrote:
karlhenning wrote:
Jack Kelso wrote:Hey! How informed are these posters? Not including Hindemith on a listing of modern masters
Very informed, Jack; Hindemith is already historical.

A great and important composer; but, no longer "modern."

"Modern" doesn't stand still.

Cheers,
~Karl
You're right, Karl. But Hindemith lived almost 25 years beyond the arbitrary cutoff date (1940) for this thread. Thus, he should be included in recommendations.

Tschüß!
Jack
Sibelius lived past 1940 as did Copland, Ives and many other composers who did not make any major contributions in the post-war period.

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Post by pizza » Thu May 17, 2007 10:48 am

karlhenning wrote:


Sibelius lived past 1940 as did Copland, Ives and many other composers who did not make any major contributions in the post-war period.
Post WW2 Copland:

The Red Pony; The Heiress; Piano Quartet; The Tender Land; Music for a Great City; Connotations; Inscapes

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Post by karlhenning » Thu May 17, 2007 10:50 am

That's not my post, pizza.

Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by pizza » Thu May 17, 2007 10:52 am

karlhenning wrote:That's not my post, pizza.

Cheers,
~Karl
Sorry. That's the way the "quote" thingy worked. Whose is it?
Last edited by pizza on Thu May 17, 2007 10:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by BWV 1080 » Thu May 17, 2007 10:53 am

pizza wrote:
karlhenning wrote:


Sibelius lived past 1940 as did Copland, Ives and many other composers who did not make any major contributions in the post-war period.
Post WW2 Copland:

The Red Pony; The Heiress; Piano Quartet; The Tender Land; Music for a Great City; Connotations; Inscapes
Not saying that those are not quality pieces, just that they are not "established "big " (not in terms of scale, but in terms of quality) pieces by musicolgists" per the OP

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Post by pizza » Thu May 17, 2007 10:54 am

BWV 1080 wrote:
pizza wrote:
karlhenning wrote:


Sibelius lived past 1940 as did Copland, Ives and many other composers who did not make any major contributions in the post-war period.
Post WW2 Copland:

The Red Pony; The Heiress; Piano Quartet; The Tender Land; Music for a Great City; Connotations; Inscapes
Not saying that those are not quality pieces, just that they are not "established "big " (not in terms of scale, but in terms of quality) pieces by musicolgists" per the OP
So you're the culprit! :wink: I think any quality piece is a major contribution to the repertoire.

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Post by diegobueno » Thu May 17, 2007 12:01 pm

BWV 1080 wrote:
pizza wrote:Post WW2 Copland:

The Red Pony; The Heiress; Piano Quartet; The Tender Land; Music for a Great City; Connotations; Inscapes
Not saying that those are not quality pieces, just that they are not "established "big " (not in terms of scale, but in terms of quality) pieces by musicolgists" per the OP
Copland Clarinet Concerto, Piano Fantasy, Connotations, should be "big" quality in anybody's book.

But of course these aren't the kind of pieces the original poster was asking for.

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Post by ichiro » Thu May 17, 2007 12:53 pm

Hey Guys,

thanks for all the feedback, that's a lot of music!! And yes, 1940 is an arbitrary date, but I think quite simply that about 1940 is the time when my knowledge of modern classical music disappears.

But I will spin a little Boulez, Ligeti, Hindemith, Carter, Part , Messaien, to begin with.

Oh, another small request, some good music by Corigliano (Jr.)? Anyone?

Thanks

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Post by slofstra » Thu May 17, 2007 1:09 pm

Regarding Corigliano. There's quite a wonderful disc by Helene Grimaud; the programming is ingenious, with selections from Corigliano, Beethoven and Part that all work together very well. I wouldn't say her piano is at the very very top, but this is a very enjoyable disc.

Image

Here is the full link:

Amazon link to Grimaud, Credo

And, did someone say somewhere that Olga Kern was a babe?

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Post by some guy » Thu May 17, 2007 4:47 pm

I haven't heard this disc of Hélène's, but of the ones I have, I'd say her playing was at the very, very top. (In fact, her Brahms 2nd is better than Richter's, and that's such high praise, I don't expect to be believed.) She's at the very, very top for looks, too, not that that matters for the music. But beauty is beauty and always a good thing.

And for Joe, I'll try to remember that you're an idiot, but I don't guarantee any success in that!! I've had the artofthestates.org bookmarked ever since I went there once. What a great service.

The original poster may be pleased with these lists, but not so much as I am. There are pieces here I've never heard of, and now I must hear them. (Thanks very much to Val for the Zimmermann opera recommendation. Seeing that work on that list tells me that I'll like it very much.)

OK. I'm done blathering. Keep posting, y'all: even if Ichiro's satisfied, I'm ready for more.
"The public has got to stay in touch with the music of its time . . . for otherwise people will gradually come to mistrust music claimed to be the best."
--Viennese critic (1843)

Confusion is a word we have invented for an order which is not understood.
--Henry Miller

John F
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Post by John F » Fri May 18, 2007 1:42 am

ichiro wrote:some good music by Corigliano
The Symphony #1, no question. The original recording conducted by Barenboim is probably the one to have.
John Francis

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Post by lennygoran » Sat May 19, 2007 6:49 am

>The Symphony #1, no question. <

John, thanks, I'll look around for this work--could you give me your opinion on his "Red Violin Concerto"--I have accessibility to that work. Regards, Len

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Post by John F » Sat May 19, 2007 10:34 am

lennygoran wrote:could you give me your opinion on his "Red Violin Concerto"
Hiya, Lenny!

Actually, I can't, as I didn't see the movie and missed a local concert perf (I had the flu). Maybe others here can say.
John Francis

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Post by lennygoran » Sat May 19, 2007 5:15 pm

> I didn't see the movie <

John, thanks, I wasn't even aware of any movie--anyway I downloaded the concerto from a performance at the 2005 Proms that also included an Adams work I never heard of: John Adams- The Chairman Dances. Regards, Len

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Post by Chalkperson » Sat May 19, 2007 6:33 pm

lennygoran wrote:John, thanks, I'll look around for this work--could you give me your opinion on his "Red Violin Concerto"--I have accessibility to that work. Regards, Len
The film is OK, but not great. The CD is definately worth a listen... :)

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Post by lennygoran » Sat May 19, 2007 7:47 pm

>The CD is definately worth a listen... <

Thanks, I'll check this out. Regards, Len

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Post by John F » Sat May 19, 2007 8:31 pm

lennygoran wrote:John Adams- The Chairman Dances
This relates to John Adams's famous opera "Nixon in China," and the dancer is Chairman Mao Tse-Tung.
John Francis

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Post by lennygoran » Sun May 20, 2007 6:04 am

>This relates to John Adams's famous opera "Nixon in China," <

John, I wonder if the Met will ever do this opera--I'm familiar with the opera's music and would like to see it done sometime. I see the work was commissioned by the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Houston Grand Opera and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts--I'm sorry I missed it when it was in Brooklyn. Talk about dancing I see the last act has the performers engaging in a foxtrot!

Some of the lyrics are interesting:

Kissinger: "Premiere, please, where's the toilet?"

Mao: "We no longer need Confucius. Let him rot." Regards, Len [g]

lennygoran
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Post by lennygoran » Sun May 20, 2007 9:17 am

>the dancer is Chairman <

John, another note--I should have realized You Tube would have this--quite an exciting dance!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPebpMGV ... ed&search=

Regards, Len [g]

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Post by Jack Kelso » Wed May 23, 2007 2:40 am

I agree about the late works of Copland, Ives, etc. ---and anyone who thinks Hindemith was written-out at age 45 probably doesn't know any of his works beyond "Mathis der Maler".

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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Post by karlhenning » Wed May 23, 2007 7:37 am

Jack Kelso wrote:. . . anyone who thinks Hindemith was written-out at age 45 . . . .
Did anyone say any such thing? What did I miss?

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
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pizza
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Post by pizza » Wed May 23, 2007 2:14 pm

Jack Kelso wrote:I agree about the late works of Copland, Ives, etc.. . .
Most of Ives's music was written between 1896 and 1916; he wrote very little after WW1 and his heart attack in 1918; he edited a few odds and ends and wrote a few songs, until 1926; he lived until 1954.

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Post by Jack Kelso » Thu May 24, 2007 3:11 am

karlhenning wrote:
Jack Kelso wrote:. . . anyone who thinks Hindemith was written-out at age 45 . . . .
Did anyone say any such thing? What did I miss?

Cheers,
~Karl

BWV insinuated that Hindemith belongs to a group of great masters who supposedly didn't write much of importance after 1940 (Symphony in E-Flat)......and enough posters dashed that idea to bits.

Tschüß!
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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