New York Magazine Cans Long Time Music Critic

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Ralph
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New York Magazine Cans Long Time Music Critic

Post by Ralph » Tue Jun 05, 2007 10:20 am

From The New York Times:

A ‘New York’ Run Ends

New York magazine’s longtime classical music critic, Peter G. Davis, will be leaving the publication. Mr. Davis, who had been at New York for 26 years, said yesterday he was asked to sign an “agreement of separation” because the magazine decided it no longer needed a full-time classical music critic. “It’s euphemistic for being fired,” he said. A spokeswoman for the magazine, Serena Torrey, said she could not comment on the terms of his departure or whether he would be replaced. “We do plan to continue robust classical music coverage and criticism,” she said. DANIEL J. WAKIN
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Lance
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Post by Lance » Tue Jun 05, 2007 10:32 am

I'm surprised at this. Peter G. Davis knows his stuff and is a fine writer. All these changes taking place in the fabulous world of classical music. Being optimistic (for the most part) history repeats itself but I doubt it will ever be as good as the days of reviewers such as Harold C. Schonberg, Virgil Thomson and several others.
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Post by Donald Isler » Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:04 pm

Well, of course there isn't much going on musically in New York, so who needs a full-time music critic?? (!!!)

Seriously, one of the things that most annoys me about the NY Times Sunday Arts section is that it used to list virtually every concert taking place in New York, and then they eliminated this page. More demoting of the importance of classical music!
Donald Isler

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Post by John F » Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:12 pm

This is the third newspaper or magazine in the last few weeks to get rid of their established classical music reviewers, following Atlanta and Minneapolis. There's clearly a spreading belief among publishers and editors that classical music doesn't matter now to their readers and communities. Which domino will fall next?
John Francis

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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jun 05, 2007 8:23 pm

Lance wrote:Peter G. Davis knows his stuff and is a fine writer.
I thought he was dreadful. But since he was dreadful for 26 years, must have been something besides his music criticism that precipitated the downsizing. New York Magazine's music criticism hasn't been worth a tinker's damn since Alan Rich left, which caused me to discontinue my subscription.
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Post by Auntie Lynn » Tue Jun 05, 2007 10:16 pm

The outre San Francisco Chronicle is canning a quarter of its whole staff...one dares to hope that looney Joshua Kosman will be in the mix somewhere...

Et par la nonce, it's time Allan Ulrich found an honest job...

Same for Stephanie von Buchau - wonder if she's still alive - never was in the past, probably isn't now...

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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jun 05, 2007 10:25 pm

Auntie Lynn wrote:Same for Stephanie von Buchau - wonder if she's still alive - never was in the past, probably isn't now...
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Post of the Day to ya, Auntie.
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Post by Gregg » Tue Jun 05, 2007 11:27 pm

Donald Isler wrote:Seriously, one of the things that most annoys me about the NY Times Sunday Arts section is that it used to list virtually every concert taking place in New York, and then they eliminated this page. More demoting of the importance of classical music!
If there is one thing that steams New York musicians this is it. Of course that's why I started the site. New York magazine goes one step closer to having its title revoked. Or changed to New York Magazine For Target Advertising.

I try to make the case that particularly small and mid-sized groups should no longer count on the media. As news becomes entertainment, serious entertainment is no longer news.

Reviews are great, after the fact, but where is the energy to inform?


Gregg


http://www.classicaldomain.org/

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Post by Lance » Wed Jun 06, 2007 12:10 am

Gregg wrote: [snipped]

Reviews are great, after the fact, but where is the energy to inform?
You are absolutely correct, Gregg. We need more people like Harris Goldsmith, a writer from whom I learned more about playing and listening to the piano than anyone else simply through his writings, especially in High-Fidelity magazine. It helped that he was a performing pianist himself. Still, Goldsmith had the ability to criticize with authority but also informed the listener. Then, too, I always especially admired Virgil Thomson's reviews, which quickly came to the point and also informed.
Lance G. Hill
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When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Jun 06, 2007 12:52 am

Lance wrote:
Gregg wrote: [snipped]

Reviews are great, after the fact, but where is the energy to inform?
You are absolutely correct, Gregg. We need more people like Harris Goldsmith, a writer from whom I learned more about playing and listening to the piano than anyone else simply through his writings, especially in High-Fidelity magazine. It helped that he was a performing pianist himself. Still, Goldsmith had the ability to criticize with authority but also informed the listener. Then, too, I always especially admired Virgil Thomson's reviews, which quickly came to the point and also informed.
What's happened to most of the classical review mags? They would rather cover more releases superficially than cover a few with depth. I used to study them all, but now they aren't worth the time.
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:01 am

Donald Isler wrote:Seriously, one of the things that most annoys me about the NY Times Sunday Arts section is that it used to list virtually every concert taking place in New York, and then they eliminated this page. More demoting of the importance of classical music!
Had to make space for the full-page ads for Rent, Don! :-)

Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:02 am

Auntie Lynn wrote:The outre San Francisco Chronicle is canning a quarter of its whole staff...one dares to hope that looney Joshua Kosman will be in the mix somewhere...
I applaud this, Auntie!
Karl Henning, PhD
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http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
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Gregg
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Post by Gregg » Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:45 am

Corlyss_D wrote: What's happened to most of the classical review mags?
That is the question. I say this a lot when I am talking about my point of view, it's obvious but bear with me.

My farther, for decades, has subscribed to Smithsonian and Natural History magazines. Every year they have civil war covers and monkey or panda bear covers. People never tire of reading about the civil war or monkey and panda bear stories.

Frankly, I think the same can be said about Beethoven - given that the right people are writing the articles. The tragedy of our new media society is that people are not given enough credit for being stimulated by ideas, so that conceptual content is submerged by personality content. The diva weight-loss issue...etc....

The reason I use those magazines as an example is because they do a great job at popularizing some significant events and ideas. That's what's missing from the art-music landscape. The media grossly underestimates the intellectual level of the classical music audience hoping that their populist leveling will bring in more revenue. The visual art magazines have resisted this to an extent, but they have become obsessed with money and fashion masquerading as culture.

The point being that professional accessible writing is a dying breed. I am trying to get funding to start a "Classical music writing initiative" for my site. Naturally it will provide me with content, but it's at least a stab at orienting classical music writing back to substance over gloss.

In any case I need to find some one connected to academia to help with the choices and to ground the program in respectability, any ideas would be appreciated.


Gregg

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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:05 pm

Gregg wrote:The media grossly underestimates the intellectual level of the classical music audience hoping that their populist leveling will bring in more revenue. The visual art magazines have resisted this to an extent, but they have become obsessed with money and fashion masquerading as culture.
They must know what sells advertising (content+numbers). I don't think they give a damn about the intellectual level of even their readers.
The point being that professional accessible writing is a dying breed. I am trying to get funding to start a "Classical music writing initiative" for my site. Naturally it will provide me with content, but it's at least a stab at orienting classical music writing back to substance over gloss.
Well, good on ya. I'll hew to my Ernest Newman.
In any case I need to find some one connected to academia to help with the choices and to ground the program in respectability, any ideas would be appreciated.
Why academia? Why not the professional musician track? You might try a music blogger with credentials, like Greg Sandow.
Last edited by Corlyss_D on Thu Jun 07, 2007 1:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Gregg » Wed Jun 06, 2007 9:20 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:Greg Sandow.
Greg is a busy guy, he's working on his own stuff., but it's a good idea. I might need to look far afield, but there is something about the image of academe that I am hoping might be fruitful.


Gregg

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