Help me choose who to explore next...

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply

Which composer's works should I explore next?

Bach
0
No votes
Debussy
5
23%
Mozart
1
5%
Beethoven
10
45%
Brahms
6
27%
 
Total votes: 22

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Help me choose who to explore next...

Post by knotslip » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:31 am

As most of you probably know, I am new to classical music and I am trying to both educate myself about the music and build a satisfying collection of classical music. I am trying to build this based on what I like and what would be considered essential to any classical collection of music (within reason). I like how the poll worked for me on choosing the Dvorak symphonies box set and I have had an opportunity to listen to some other assorted works by other composers to see what I like...So I thought I would ask, via a poll, what I should move on to next?
I have, by no means purchased all of Dvorak's works or even come close, but I have a couple box sets and individual CD;s that I feel are a great start - so now I want to move on to the next composer, whoever it might be. Part of the enjoyment in all of this is exploring new composers and the new sounds and styles they each offer.

Since I am only familiar with the most popular of pieces by each composer...it only matters that I've heard and liked some of composer's works. Then I can delve further into their music and see where it leads me. Thanks for your recommendations.

slofstra
Posts: 8900
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Contact:

Post by slofstra » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:45 am

The question is exceedingly difficult! It would require me to recreate in my mind the experience of having listened mostly to Dvorak and only a little of the others.
I assume you're being a little modest in describing your current experience, judging by the posts you've written. If I met a complete classical neophyte, I think I would suggest, in this order:

Beethoven symphonies
Beethoven piano sonatas
Mozart piano concertoes
Mozart late symphonies and other orchestral works
Bach concertoes and overtures
Mozart opera

But if I had met myself in an early stage of listening I would not have suggested that pattern at all, but spent more of my early time on choral work - which I personally enjoy the most.

I voted for Debussy though. Because he's a contemporary of Dvorak. And it would be a unique and befitting choice for only you.

I would try and be a bit deliberately random about this. Let impulse be your guide. It will be the only way to find things out of the mainstream that are personal wayposts.
Last edited by slofstra on Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 17407
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Post by Lance » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:49 am

Since you have such a love and devotion for DVORAK, I would say you might investigate Johannes Brahms. While there are only four symphonies, there are many songs, two piano concertos, much chamber music galore, solo literature for piano, clarinet/violin/viola music, but not a compositional output in huge numbers. You can thus pick and choose carefully some of the great recordings of Brahms - and the choices are many. But I don't think you'll break the bank like you might with Bach or Mozart. Anyway, I'm 100% sure you will get myriad opinions what where to go next, and it will ultimately be your choice. Possibly after that you may want to investigate the French impressionistic school, i.e. Debussy. Then maybe go backwards to the period of Bach. Eventually, you'll get there as most veteran collectors do.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

RebLem
Posts: 9021
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Post by RebLem » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:54 am

I would suggest "none of the above."

The next composer you should explore is F.J. Haydn.

The early classical period was dominated by Haydn. He was the first of the great classical era composers. The classical era moved away from the baroque emphasis on fugue and counterpoint, and moved to the writing of melody over a bass line. Of course, that was done by baroque composers, too, in some cases, and counterpoint and fugue are not unknown in classical works (listen to the finale of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony as an example of the latter). Its a question of emphasis and focus more than absolutes.

Haydn developed two types of composition to their modern forms: the string quartet, beginning with the Opus 20 set, and the symphony. It was left to Mozart to develop the concerto form and, arguably, opera to something like their modern form, but Haydn's developments are often simpler, and because the key shifts are often to remote keys rather than closely related ones, as in Mozart, his works are much easier to follow than Mozart's. Haydn built the foundation on which Mozart and Beethoven and the more classically oriented romantic and 20th century composers built. You must understand him before you can hope to fully appreciate Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Dvorak, Prokofiev, or Shostakovich.

And, when studying Haydn, concentrate on the quartets, the symphonies, the Masses, and the Oratorios, to all of which Haydn made significant contributions.

One of the great things about this is that its really simple (except for the amount of money involved) to get started. Get the 21 CD Philips Angeles String Quartet set of all the quartets, the 33 CD London Dorati box of the Haydn symphonies, and the 7 CD London set of the Masses, and you're set except for the oratorios--there, start with the Bernstein SONY Creation.

Others are going to tell you that its not necessary to get all the symphonies. Pay them no mind. What impresses most of all about the symphonies is their vigor and sophistication and sheer tuneful appeal right from the very beginning. You can't get that unless you have all of them. Yes, there are other recording of some of the symphonies worth getting--Jochum in the London Symphonies, Szell in the first 6 London Symphonies, Woldike in the last 6 London Symphonies, the Klemperer box (big orchestra Haydn, but with divisi violins, and wonderfully and enthusiastically performed), the Kuijken Paris Symphonies, even the Bohm Syms 88-92 + the Sinfonia Concertante if DGG ever decides to re-release the complete 6 work set on CD--one of the major items on my wants list for record companies to reissue. But Dorati is very good, and he will give you the basics, and you will only hear many delights by getting one or another complete set. One of my favorites, for example, is # 72, which has, believe it or not, a proto-Elgarian first movement, and has not been recorded by anyone who has not recorded the complete cycle.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

RebLem
Posts: 9021
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Post by RebLem » Sat Jul 28, 2007 12:32 pm

If you should decide to explore some Bach, here is a very rock-bottom basic Bach starter collection:

Bach: Brandenburg Concerti. Marriner, ASMF (2 Philips CDs)
Bach: Toccata & Fuge in D Minor, S. 565 & 17 other organ works, the most popular Bach organ works. Peter Hurford (2 Decca)
Bach: 4 Secular Cantatas. Collegium Aureum, Elly Ameling, et al (2 DHM Edito Classica CDs)
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

lmpower
Posts: 877
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 2:18 pm
Location: Twentynine Palms, California

Post by lmpower » Sat Jul 28, 2007 12:49 pm

Brahms is the most contemporary and similar to Dvorak of those listed. They both admired one another very much. I would also recommend Tchaikowsky as the next step. They were both Slavic and lived in the same historical period.

david johnson
Posts: 1437
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 5:04 am
Location: ark/mo

Post by david johnson » Sat Jul 28, 2007 1:08 pm

Beethoven, since he sounds much different. Think of it as broadening your aural spectrum.

dj

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Jul 28, 2007 1:13 pm

I voted for Debussy because he ain't Austrian/German, his major works are easy to get your head around, and he don't sound like Brahms or Dvorak. His complete piano music, which is the locus of his genius, can be had in 4 discs and a practical 2fer will get the major orchestral works. If you do go for Debussy, get the piano music by Gieseking, still the gold standard of Debussy interpretations, on EMI.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17643
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Post by Chalkperson » Sat Jul 28, 2007 2:26 pm

Beethoven, he will keep you busy for a while, and it's all good, plus you will recognize things you have heard on the Radio etc...and there are a lot of LVB experts here...John, Rod etc...just start those two off and Enjoy the Fun... :D

Rod Corkin

Post by Rod Corkin » Sat Jul 28, 2007 2:53 pm

Of course I voted for Beethoven, but if you want to try out Handel for free I've posted links to about 20 WMAs at the Messiah topic below in this room. I recommend you do.

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Post by Ralph » Sat Jul 28, 2007 8:43 pm

It's not on your list but for a real eyeopening treat, check out Dittersdorf. A number of his works are available on inexpensive NAXOS releases. Once you hear his music you'll be hooked!
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26380
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Jul 28, 2007 8:57 pm

Ralph wrote:It's not on your list but for a real eyeopening treat, check out Dittersdorf. A number of his works are available on inexpensive NAXOS releases. Once you hear his music you'll be hooked!
Pay no attention to the man in the booth. :)

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

piston
Posts: 10767
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:50 am

Post by piston » Sat Jul 28, 2007 9:19 pm

It may help you to rely on an even much larger pool of classical music programmers and radio listeners. It's quite amazing how these data tend to follow the same order of preference, month after month. Not that I would follow such an order of preferred composers but, like a constellation in the sky, collective taste does tend to form clusters and the top ten or twelve composers most frequently programmed, below, could be viewed as the Milky Way! (Note that the listing is flawed in one instance, that of Josef Haydn. I guess, that this error implies he should rank even higher on the list). But Anton Dvorak is right up there with the "best."

Top composers played on classical music radio stations in the U.S.
1 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
2 Ludwig van Beethoven
3 Johann Sebastian Bach
4 Antonin Dvorak
5 Joseph Haydn
6 Franz Schubert
7 Felix Mendelssohn
8 Johannes Brahms
9 Antonio Vivaldi
10 Peter Tchaikovsky
11 Claude Debussy
12 George Frideric Handel
13 Robert Schumann
14 Maurice Ravel
15 Franz Joseph Haydn
16 Frederic Chopin
17 Richard Wagner
18 Jean Sibelius
19 Edvard Grieg
20 Gioacchino Rossini
21 Richard Strauss
22 Edward Elgar
23 Georg Philipp Telemann
24 Franz Liszt
25 Aaron Copland
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

Donaldopato
Posts: 1900
Joined: Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:27 am
Location: Kansas City
Contact:

Post by Donaldopato » Sat Jul 28, 2007 9:33 pm

Oh I would say that Andrej Panufnik is next in line to explore.

Actually I chose Beethoven for the sole reason that Beethoven was one of my first composers to explore. I remember my first disc of classical music, Beethoven 1st Piano Concerto Toscanini and Ania Dorfmann on RCA.
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

slofstra
Posts: 8900
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Contact:

Post by slofstra » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:45 pm

piston wrote:It may help you to rely on an even much larger pool of classical music programmers and radio listeners. It's quite amazing how these data tend to follow the same order of preference, month after month. Not that I would follow such an order of preferred composers but, like a constellation in the sky, collective taste does tend to form clusters and the top ten or twelve composers most frequently programmed, below, could be viewed as the Milky Way! (Note that the listing is flawed in one instance, that of Josef Haydn. I guess, that this error implies he should rank even higher on the list). But Anton Dvorak is right up there with the "best."

Top composers played on classical music radio stations in the U.S.
1 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
2 Ludwig van Beethoven
3 Johann Sebastian Bach
4 Antonin Dvorak
5 Joseph Haydn
6 Franz Schubert
7 Felix Mendelssohn
8 Johannes Brahms
9 Antonio Vivaldi
10 Peter Tchaikovsky
11 Claude Debussy
12 George Frideric Handel
13 Robert Schumann
14 Maurice Ravel
15 Franz Joseph Haydn
16 Frederic Chopin
17 Richard Wagner
18 Jean Sibelius
19 Edvard Grieg
20 Gioacchino Rossini
21 Richard Strauss
22 Edward Elgar
23 Georg Philipp Telemann
24 Franz Liszt
25 Aaron Copland
We had a thread a few months ago on CMG - top 20 composers. I compiled the results and this was the consensus:

1 Beethoven
2 Mozart
3 Bach
4 Brahms
5 Schumann
6 Haydn
7 Schubert
8 Tchaikovsky
9 Handel
10 Chopin
11 Wagner
12 Mendelssohn
13 Shostakovich *
14 Mahler *
15 Rachmaninoff *
16 Dvorak
17 Debussy
18 R.Strauss
19 Bruckner *
20 Prokofiev *
21 Stravinsky *
22 Sibelius
23 Verdi *
24 Liszt
25 Vaughan Williams *

(based on 16 responses)

The top 12 are all on the airplay list. I marked with an * those missing from the airplay list. Shostakovich, Mahler among them.

IcedNote
Posts: 2960
Joined: Tue Apr 04, 2006 5:24 pm
Location: NYC

Post by IcedNote » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:55 pm

Beethoven...simply because he's the best there is. :)

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Sun Jul 29, 2007 12:16 am

Wow, thanks for all of the replies so far. There is definitely no shortage of things to listen to as a newcomer to this genre. I know there are many otehr composers and i am by no means limiting my explorations to these that I've included on this poll. But, I had to narrow it down a bit not to make it too overwhelming of a choice and the ones I have included are composers that I have heard something (even if only a single movement of 1 symphony) by.

Since I have no idea of what an essential collection should consist of or what direction to go, I am relying on you guys to nudge me along with your experienced recommendations. I do appreciate your inputs very much and I value every one of them. I will let the poll choose for me and if a tie occurrs then I will decide between the tied composers.

I thought of adding Tchaikovsky because I also love every thing I've heard by him but for some reason he slipped my mind when I was creating the poll. He will be there to explore another day though. So far it looks like Beethoven is a sure winner - but I am going to leave the poll up for a week or so before deciding.

I've never heard of Dittersdorf or Andrej Panufnik...

Thanks for the great advice and your suggestions - I know it isn't an easy question. I can imagine someone asking me the same type of question about Metal...Although I would start them on the classic stuff like Black Sabbath, Judas Priest, Iron Maiden and some others. Every genre has it's core or it's masters.

Thanks to everyone for the great suggestions. I will be sure to let you all know what I pick and what I think. Actually, I may be asking for recommendations of specific pieces once I learn who's music I'll be exploring next.

Unreleated question : What's the deal with Holst? I have a CD of The Planets and I remember that symphony being part of a music appreciation class that I took back in my undergrad days. But I never see him mentioned anywhere and I don't know of another work by him other than The Planets. I love the Jupiter movement of that symphony. Is he a 1-work wonder?
Last edited by knotslip on Sun Jul 29, 2007 9:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Sun Jul 29, 2007 12:46 am

knotslip wrote:Since I have no idea of what an essential collection should consist of or what direction to go, I am relying on you guys to nudge me along with your experienced recommendations.
When essential collection is mentioned, I can't help but bring up Ted Libbey's book for NPR, The NPR Guide to Building a Classical CD Collection : The 350 Essential Works (buy used). Not that we aren't eager to help, but we all have our idiosyncratic favorites. Wouldn't want you to be thinking that Ligeti is essential . . . . :wink: (pace, someguy)

I thought of adding Tchaikovsky because I also love every thing I've heard by him but for some reason he slipped my mind when I was creating the poll. He will be there to explore another day though. So far it looks like Beethoven is a sure winner - but I am going to leave the poll up for a week or so before deciding.
If you have to do Tchaikovsky, go for the ballets.
Unreleated question : What's the deal with Holst? I have a CD of The Planets and I remember that symphony being part of a music appreciation class that I took back in my undergrad days. But I never see him mentioned anywhere and I don't know of another work by him other than The Planets. I love the Jupiter movement of that symphony. Is he a 1-work wonder?
Who doesn't love Jupiter? The Brits almost turned it into their national anthem as "Land of Hope and Glory" during WW2. The Planets is probably his most famous work, but, no he wasn't a one-hit wonder. His beautiful Suites for Band are probably almost as well known among bandsmen. There's his St Paul Suite, written for the musicians at the girls' school where he taught. There's his marvelous little chamber canata or opera, Savitri based on a Hindu legend. There's assorted carols, hymns, and choir pieces.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

Auntie Lynn
Posts: 1123
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 10:42 pm

Post by Auntie Lynn » Sun Jul 29, 2007 7:05 pm

Get yourself one of those not-too-expensive samplers they advertise on TV and decide for yourself what you like...

There's quite a spread...

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Sun Jul 29, 2007 8:13 pm

I do have a sampler box set and some individual discs that have an assortment of material. The problem with these is they have 1 very small part of a very large work. It is, however, probably the best (cheapest) way to explore many composer's works and then move on to the bigger stuff. This is essentially what I am doing. I've heard something by everyone in the poll and liked it. The poll is just a way for me to make a decision as to who I should explore next. I'm an engineer and making quick decisions without analyzing it to death is hard for me. :D


How many of you like only certain parts/movements of a particular work? Is this a common thing? Just curious...

Brahms
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:21 pm

Post by Brahms » Sun Jul 29, 2007 8:36 pm

Brahms

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Post by Ralph » Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:09 pm

Carl [Karl] Ditters von Dittersdorf
(1739 - 1799)

Composer and violin virtuoso; born Carl Ditters. Through service in Karl VI's army, his father had gained a position as costume designer in the imperial theater. In 1750 the boy Carl obtained a post as violinist in Vienna's Schottenkircheorchestra. Prince Joseph Friedrich von Sachsen-Hildburghausen noticed him and hired him for his court orchestra. There he studied violin with Francesco Trani and composition with Giuseppe Bonno; during this period he also became acquainted with Haydn and Gluck. In 1761 he was made violinist for the imperial court theater, and in 1763 he traveled to Bologna with Gluck.

After a salary dispute with the imperial theater in 1764, Differs took a post as Kapellmeister for the court of Adam Patachich, Hungarian nobleman and Bishop of Grosswardein (Oradea, Romania). There he composed mostly church music and Schuldramen; he lost his job in 1769 when Empress Maria Theresa denounced the bishop. The following year he met Schaffgotsch, Prince-Bishop of Breslau, who wished to start a musical establishment at his court at Johannisberg (near Javorník, Czechoslovakia), In 1770 or 1771 Ditters accepted the post as court composer; this employment formed the center of his creative activities for the next twenty years. He composed symphonies, chamber music, and opere buffe. In 1773 the prince made Ditters Amtshauptmannof nearby Freiwaldau, one of several measures to help entice the cosmopolitan composer to remain at the isolated Johannisberg; since this new post required a noble title, Ditters was sent to Vienna to become, for a fee, von Dittersdorf.

From the early 1780s Dittersdorf began making frequent appearances in Vienna: in 1784 or 1785 six of his twelve programmatic "Ovid" symphonies were performed in the imperial Augarten, and in 1786 his oratorio Hiob was performed at a benefit for the Tonkünstlersozietät. His breakthrough came in 1786, when his comic opera Der Apotheker und der Doktor became a huge success in Vienna and quickly traveled to nearly every major theater in Europe. In the wake of its success he composed eight more German comic operas during the next five years, four of which achieved international fame. In 1789 he traveled to Berlin, where Friedrich Wilhelm had him mount extravagant performances of Hiob and Apotheker.

In 1794 Dittersdorf began composing comic operas for a small Silesian court theater at Oels (now Olésnica, Poland), which were mounted by the Weimarbased Waeser troupe. At the same time he experienced a falling-out with Schaffgotsch, who finally expelled him from his palace; the composer was spared from utmost poverty by an offer in 1795 from Baron Ignaz von Stillfried to live at his spare castle in southern Bohemia. His final decade was occupied with overseeing operatic productions and with compiling and editing his own music for publication.

He composed some forty-five operas (Il finto pazzo per amore, Betrug durch Aberglauben, Die Liebe im Narrenhause, Das rothe Käppchen), sacred vocal music, at least 120 symphonies, chamber music (including string quartets), and keyboard music. His florid autobiography (Lebenbeschreibung, Leipzig, 1801) provides a valuable glimpse of the life of an 18th-century court musician.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26380
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:22 pm

Ralph wrote:Carl [Karl] Ditters von Dittersdorf
(1739 - 1799)

Composer and violin virtuoso; born Carl Ditters, etc.
Well, this will certainly convince anybody that he is their next best bet.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Ken
Posts: 2511
Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 6:17 am
Location: Düsseldorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen

Post by Ken » Mon Jul 30, 2007 9:12 am

I agree with those who believe you should check out Brahms. His catalogue isn't as large as Beethoven's or Mozarts (and certainly not Haydn's!), and he and Dvorak were at times good friends. Aside from Lance's recommendations, you might wish to look into the Hungarian Dances and the Violin/Double Concertos, both of which are very Slavic in feeling owing to the influence of his great friend and collaborator, the Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim.
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

Justin
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:23 pm

Post by Justin » Mon Jul 30, 2007 1:20 pm

Just putting in my vote for Beethoven! If you enjoy classical music, you will love his symphonies (well, I guess there will always be exceptions!).

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26380
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Mon Jul 30, 2007 3:56 pm

Corlyss_D wrote: Who doesn't love Jupiter? The Brits almost turned it into their national anthem as "Land of Hope and Glory" during WW2. .
"Land of Hope and Glory" is Pomp and Circumstance No. 1, hon. "Jupiter" is "I Vow to Thee My Country." Neither holds a candle to "Jerusalem," a patriotic song by C.H.H. Parry based (rather inappropriately, actually) on a brief political poem by the great poet William Blake on the depredations of the Industrial Revolution.

Bring me my bow of burning gold:
Bring me my arrows of desire:
Bring me my spear: O clouds unfold!
Bring me my chariot of fire.

I will not cease from mental fight,
Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand
Till we have built Jerusalem
In England's green and pleasant land.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17643
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Post by Chalkperson » Mon Jul 30, 2007 5:40 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote: Who doesn't love Jupiter? The Brits almost turned it into their national anthem as "Land of Hope and Glory" during WW2. .
"Land of Hope and Glory" is Pomp and Circumstance No. 1, hon. "Jupiter" is "I Vow to Thee My Country." Neither holds a candle to "Jerusalem," a patriotic song by C.H.H. Parry based (rather inappropriately, actually) on a brief political poem by the great poet William Blake on the depredations of the Industrial Revolution.

Bring me my bow of burning gold:
Bring me my arrows of desire:
Bring me my spear: O clouds unfold!
Bring me my chariot of fire.

I will not cease from mental fight,
Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand
Till we have built Jerusalem
In England's green and pleasant land.
They just re-released Lindsay Anderson's 'If' with Malcolm MacDowell...it was filmed at Cheltenham College, where I went to school when I was 10 before we moved back to Wales...what a wondeful 'tune' Jerusalem truly is... :wink:

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:13 am

jbuck919 wrote:"Land of Hope and Glory" is Pomp and Circumstance No. 1, hon. "Jupiter" is "I Vow to Thee My Country."
Yikes! Right you are. Which one were the Brits going to make their national anthem? P&C don't hold a candle to the other one.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Sat Aug 04, 2007 3:49 pm

Okay, thanks for all the votes. Beethoven it is. Actually, I have been listening to an old Beethoven CD i have of the 5th and 6th symphonies lately and i like it very much. I think I'm going to get Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 1-9 [Special Edition] [Hybrid SACD] [HYBRID SACD] [IMPORT] for the symphonies and then I will require some recommendations for Beethoven's piano sonatas and other must haves for beethoven. Any recommendations appreciated.

Thank you.

Bösendorfer
Posts: 328
Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 6:22 am
Location: NJ

Post by Bösendorfer » Sat Aug 04, 2007 4:08 pm

I don't think this site has been mentioned yet:

http://www.classical.net/music/rep/top.html (Basic Repertoire)

It has been most useful to me in exploring various composers, even if I dont' always agree
with the choices made there. Also if you have access to some public library with a good
classical cd collection, that can be a very cheap way of figuring out what you like.

I also find the "Rough Guide to Classical Music" quite helpful (brief biographies of composers
and comments on some important works).

Florian

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Tue Aug 07, 2007 12:21 pm

Great site Florian, thanks.

And thanks to everyone for the votes. Now I just have to decide what Beethoven pieces to purchase??? I was thinking a set of his symphonies and a set of his Piano sonatas...At least to start.

Any recommendations for the sonatas?

I think I'm going to purchase the SACD box of his symphonies :

Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
Conductor: Bernard Haitink
Performer: Gerald Finley, Timothy Hugh, Karen Cargill, Lars Vogt, Twyla Robinson, et al.
Orchestra: London Symphony Orchestra
Audio CD (September 12, 2006)
Number of Discs: 6
Format: Hybrid SACD, Import
Label: Lso Live UK
ASIN: B000GUJYRE

Is this a good start or are there some important pieces that I am missing? Obviously, I can't purcahse it all right now but I'd like to get a get sampling of his works and at least get the essentials.

Thanks.

Bösendorfer
Posts: 328
Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 6:22 am
Location: NJ

Post by Bösendorfer » Wed Aug 08, 2007 2:13 pm

knotslip wrote:Great site Florian, thanks.
You are welcome!
knotslip wrote:And thanks to everyone for the votes. Now I just have to decide what Beethoven pieces to purchase???
As for chamber music, I would vote for the cello sonatas and also the violin sonatas. But then
there are also the string quartets, and they really are more important...

Incidentally: if you search, you will find several long threads that discuss different recordings
of the piano sonatas!

Florian

slofstra
Posts: 8900
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Contact:

Post by slofstra » Wed Aug 08, 2007 5:19 pm

knotslip wrote:Great site Florian, thanks.

And thanks to everyone for the votes. Now I just have to decide what Beethoven pieces to purchase??? I was thinking a set of his symphonies and a set of his Piano sonatas...At least to start.

Any recommendations for the sonatas?

I think I'm going to purchase the SACD box of his symphonies :

Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
Conductor: Bernard Haitink
Performer: Gerald Finley, Timothy Hugh, Karen Cargill, Lars Vogt, Twyla Robinson, et al.
Orchestra: London Symphony Orchestra
Audio CD (September 12, 2006)
Number of Discs: 6
Format: Hybrid SACD, Import
Label: Lso Live UK
ASIN: B000GUJYRE

Is this a good start or are there some important pieces that I am missing? Obviously, I can't purcahse it all right now but I'd like to get a get sampling of his works and at least get the essentials.

Thanks.
There are members here who don't like Haitink. I think he is underrated. His Shostakovich set is so wonderful. I don't have the breadth of experience that some members have in backing their choices, but I think sometimes a kind of calcifying consensus sets in that is hard to shake. Recommendations for 'best' are almost always for older recordings. Given all that, I haven't heard this set. You can buy Rattle's recent set for a very modest price, and I really like it (another choice that goes against the grain). But I would be inclined to start with a varied selection of conductors unless a bargain presents itself.

You must have Kleiber's Fifth. And Bernstein's Sixth (controversial choice, though). And Karajan's Ninth and his Seventh. Those are off the top of my head.

I think I remember chalkie saying the Haitink is very good.

Sonatas. The Schnabel set is highly rated and you can buy it for next to nothing. Here's what you might have fun with though and could be a good way to start. Almost every pianist of note has a single CD sonatas collection with the warhorses: Appasionata, Pathetique, Moonlight maybe the Waldstein. So at modest cost you could get Horowitz, Brendel, Kempff, Arrau, and so on. Compare and see who you like. Everyone raves about Kempff but I find him a little dry, for example. But definitely count on getting a complete set at some point, or two, or more.
Last edited by slofstra on Wed Aug 08, 2007 5:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17643
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Post by Chalkperson » Wed Aug 08, 2007 5:23 pm

slofstra wrote: You must have Kleiber's Fifth. And Bernstein's Sixth (controversial choice, though). And Karajan's Ninth and his Seventh. Those are off the top of my head.

I think I remember chalkie saying the Haitink is very good.
Yes, it's a great set, and I was sceptical about it...don't forget Kleiber's Seventh, it's on the same disc as the Fifth, and also available as a SACD...

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Fri Aug 10, 2007 10:07 am

Great. Thanks for the recommendations. I'm still wroking through my new Dvorak symphonies box set so I have some time to order the Beethoven stuff. These are some great ideas as to how I can hear some of the pianists and different versions without buying the entire set. I will definitely try this. I have an assorted array of classical discs that I've been listening to in my car...problem is that some are very cheap and sound quality is poor. Performers are also obscure. For example, I hvae been listening to Beethoven's nineth and it is okay but the recording is horrendous. Can't wait to hear it on SACD. Now I've put a double disc set of Bach's orchestral suites and Handel's Water Music in my car - it is very interesting stuff. :-)

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 24 guests