Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

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pizza
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Post by pizza » Wed Oct 03, 2007 5:08 am

Anyone looking for the Richter-Haaser/von Karajan/BPO release will be pleasantly surprised by this Royal Classics 2fer; it also has both Liszt Concerti with Garrick Ohlsson (when he could still play well) accompanied by Moshe Atzmon/New Philharmonia O.; and also a couple of Beethoven Sonatas excellently played by Richter-Haaser. It's a cheapie (or was when I got it) but the remastered sound is first class -- much better than the LPs.

http://cd.ciao.co.uk/Great_Piano_Concer ... ductdetail

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Post by slofstra » Wed Oct 03, 2007 7:02 pm

Mahler wrote:
slofstra wrote:It can take some work to unseat the reference point, and it may also require a radically different approach to make one listen.
I guess it depends on what the reference point is. For example, I first heard Brahms' violin concerto with Anne-Sophie Mutter, Kurt Masur and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. I was so overwhelmed - and have remained so to this day - that I never really felt the need to get another interpretation of that composition (I normally purchase several CDs of my favourite pieces). One day I stumbled over a Szeryng version (Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Haitink), and it was a huge drop-off. I do not usually hand out harsh criticism, but that version was infinitely worse (not different, just worse) than Mutter's who will be tough to unseat as a reference point.

Then again, some others have been unseated. I first encountered Brahms' symphonies with Sawallisch and the London Philharmonic, and while those are solid renditions, I have since found several who are vastly superior (Kleiber's 4th, for one). The same is true oft what David Zinman and Sir Neville Marriner who introduced me to Beethoven's and Tchaikovsky's symphonies, respectively, and have since been dwarved by other conductors and their renditions.

I assume the first version of a composition can coincidentally be the best (for your own taste) you will ever hear, and if it is not, it will probably be replaced in time.
Incidentally, did Kleiber do any other of the Brahm's symphonies? I presently have the 4th in my amazon shopping cart and am looking forward to getting it.
I've recently also discovered quite a bit of enjoyment in some of the conductor/ performer sets on DG or other labels. It's very interesting to listen through a dozen or more familiar compositions by a new conductor.
My youngest brother is somewhat of a classical buff. He refuses (or has so far) to buy a second rendition of anything.

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Post by moldyoldie » Wed Oct 03, 2007 7:24 pm

slofstra wrote:....did Kleiber do any other of the Brahm's symphonies? I presently have the 4th in my amazon shopping cart and am looking forward to getting it.
Kleiber also recorded Brahms' Symphony No. 2, though the most economical way of getting it is probably on this DVD.

Also, just to bring it to your attention, Deutsche Grammophon released this fine tribute album which includes not only his Brahms No. 4, but also a uniquely pointed Schubert Unfinished Symphony and some beautifully performed excerpts from Wagner's Tristan und Isolde; it's probably a better deal as well, especially if bought used.

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Post by Mahler » Wed Oct 03, 2007 11:17 pm

slofstra wrote:I presently have the 4th in my amazon shopping cart and am looking forward to getting it.
Brilliant choice, as far as I am concerned. I do not think you will regret it. There is nothing I can equate it to (which does not necessarily make it the best version; it is just special).

As for your question, moldyoldie has already been kind enough to provide an answer I could not have, since I have never studied Kleiber's discography. I did notice, however, that Kleiber recordings are few and far between, not only with Brahms but with other composers as well.
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Post by Mahler » Wed Oct 03, 2007 11:36 pm

I forgot to mention that I now own this, the interesting part being that it is once again Abbado who conducts, which allows for comparisons with my Pollini recording. While I consider the Brendel version to be very good, it does not feature the same qualities of the Pollini, which I suspect to be much faster and much more fluent than the average interpretation of Brahms' second piano concerto. It is interesting to detect the changes Abbado made as a conductor, as this version features the orchestra much more prominently; at some points there even is a call 'n response between Brendel and the strings, something that cannot be found with the Pollini, in which the instruments are much more coherent; they function as one homogenic body of music (at least to my hearing). Brendel also likes to settle down during some stretches, which Pollini never did, being a dynamic tour de force which seems unstoppable in its forward motion (I assume that is what I like about it). Listening to Brendel coincidentally strengthened my believe in Pollini, although I consider the latter recording a good reference point even less than before; its overall tempo probably is too unusual.
"Auch das Schöne muss sterben."

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Post by slofstra » Thu Oct 04, 2007 8:53 am

Mahler wrote:
slofstra wrote:I presently have the 4th in my amazon shopping cart and am looking forward to getting it.
Brilliant choice, as far as I am concerned. I do not think you will regret it. There is nothing I can equate it to (which does not necessarily make it the best version; it is just special).

As for your question, moldyoldie has already been kind enough to provide an answer I could not have, since I have never studied Kleiber's discography. I did notice, however, that Kleiber recordings are few and far between, not only with Brahms but with other composers as well.
Rembrandt painted hundreds and Vermeer only a few. Funny how that is, but I've read that was Kleiber's temperament. I'm sure someone here could expand.

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Post by slofstra » Thu Oct 04, 2007 9:07 am

Mahler wrote:I forgot to mention that I now own this, the interesting part being that it is once again Abbado who conducts, which allows for comparisons with my Pollini recording. While I consider the Brendel version to be very good, it does not feature the same qualities of the Pollini, which I suspect to be much faster and much more fluent than the average interpretation of Brahms' second piano concerto. It is interesting to detect the changes Abbado made as a conductor, as this version features the orchestra much more prominently; at some points there even is a call 'n response between Brendel and the strings, something that cannot be found with the Pollini, in which the instruments are much more coherent; they function as one homogenic body of music (at least to my hearing). Brendel also likes to settle down during some stretches, which Pollini never did, being a dynamic tour de force which seems unstoppable in its forward motion (I assume that is what I like about it). Listening to Brendel coincidentally strengthened my believe in Pollini, although I consider the latter recording a good reference point even less than before; its overall tempo probably is too unusual.
That particular recording with Brendel and Abbado is my first love with this piece, as I listened ONLY to that for many years. Pollini and Brendel are very different. Brendel is more studied; Pollini more rhythmic. Pollini's Waldstein was long my favourite of all Beethoven sonata recordings though that may change as I have so much more to listen to. This conversation is much to our previous point. If you play the Brendel 4 or 5 more times, see if it grows on you.

A tangent. Speaking of Abbado, the Sunday New York Times had a very long, good article on Abbado and the Lucerne Festival Orchestra.
Let me know if this link works:
NYT article on Abbada, 30/9/2007
If not, just use the Search box and look for 'Abbado'. Apparently, NYT is going to a free content model on the web, so it would be good to see if we can easily link to it.

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Post by Mahler » Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:47 pm

slofstra wrote:Pollini and Brendel are very different. Brendel is more studied; Pollini more rhythmic. Pollini's Waldstein was long my favourite of all Beethoven sonata recordings though that may change as I have so much more to listen to. This conversation is much to our previous point. If you play the Brendel 4 or 5 more times, see if it grows on you.
I certainly will. Funny that I like both Pollini and Brendel equally well when it comes to Beethoven's fifth piano concerto ("Emperor"). But with Brahms' second, I guess I just entered it on the fast side (with Pollini), and it might prove difficult to get used to slower versions. In time, once I obtain more recordings of that piece, I am confident it will level out.
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Post by slofstra » Thu Oct 04, 2007 1:05 pm

I am not a big fan of the 'Emperor'. Which doesn't mean I dislike it, but I prefer the 3rd and especially the 4th concertos. Would it make sense to say that the 'Emperor' is too Beethoven-ish? I know I am setting myself up here, but what the hey.

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Post by Chalkperson » Thu Oct 04, 2007 1:38 pm

slofstra wrote:I am not a big fan of the 'Emperor'. Which doesn't mean I dislike it, but I prefer the 3rd and especially the 4th concertos. Would it make sense to say that the 'Emperor' is too Beethoven-ish? I know I am setting myself up here, but what the hey.
I think it's one of his finest achievements, I love 3+4 as well but there is spmething about No.5 that makes me play it at least once a week...

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Post by rogch » Sun Oct 07, 2007 11:05 am

The Freire/Chailly recording has just won a Gramophone award as "disc of the year" so it should be worth checking out. The recommendations in this forum has a tendency to be dominated by old recordings.
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Anders Wik » Tue Aug 04, 2009 5:33 pm

I just went through my recordings of Brahms PC1.
It´s TEN of them, and later this automn I will have a blindtesting
(with help from my wife) of them. It´s Arrau, Buchbinder, Tiberghien, Serkin, Kovacevich (EMI), Andsnes, Ashkenazy (latest), Curzon, Freire & Gilels. In that order you have my preferences before the blindtesting.
(Arrau worst-Gileles best). It will be interesting to see the order after my blindtesting !

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Barry » Tue Aug 04, 2009 5:48 pm

Anders Wik wrote:I just went through my recordings of Brahms PC1.
It´s TEN of them, and later this automn I will have a blindtesting
(with help from my wife) of them. It´s Arrau, Buchbinder, Tiberghien, Serkin, Kovacevich (EMI), Andsnes, Ashkenazy (latest), Curzon, Freire & Gilels. In that order you have my preferences before the blindtesting.
(Arrau worst-Gileles best). It will be interesting to see the order after my blindtesting !
If the Gilels is his recording with Jochum on DG, I'm not sure how you can fail to recognize it, even in blind tests. That big wall of sound Jochum draws from the BPO during the orchestral salvos in the opening movement is unmistakable. It's one of my favorite recordings of any concerto, period.
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by slofstra » Tue Aug 04, 2009 5:51 pm

Anders Wik wrote:I just went through my recordings of Brahms PC1.
It´s TEN of them, and later this automn I will have a blindtesting
(with help from my wife) of them. It´s Arrau, Buchbinder, Tiberghien, Serkin, Kovacevich (EMI), Andsnes, Ashkenazy (latest), Curzon, Freire & Gilels. In that order you have my preferences before the blindtesting.
(Arrau worst-Gileles best). It will be interesting to see the order after my blindtesting !
Look forward to your findings, Anders.

It was interesting to see a Brahms PC thread. And then to see I had already contributed to it! Saved me posting all over again. Since that time I have acquired a few more Brahms' PC #2. I now have Kuerti/ Rescgino, Freire/ Chailly, Anda/ Fricsay, Richter/ Maazel, Richter/ Leinsdorf, Brendel/ Abbado, Rubinstein/ Ormandy, Ax/ Haitink, Moravec/ Belohlavek. I can honestly say I like every performance, although I haven't had a chance to listen to Richter/ Maazel yet. It's included in the Richter ICON set on EMI. My favourite is still the Ax/Haitink version.

I only have 4 versions of Brahms PC #1. How does Andsnes stand up in this crowded field?

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Anders Wik » Tue Aug 04, 2009 5:52 pm

Yepp. It is. I really think only Chailly (Freire) and Sawallish (Kovacevich) come close....but just close.
So I will probably not miss it.

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Anders Wik » Tue Aug 04, 2009 5:57 pm

I bought Andsnes just two weeks ago. So I have just heard it once and it worked quite well. No Gilels perhaps but...
My blindtestings will prove more interesting surely. What about Richter and PC1 ? Have anybody heard him in that concerto ?

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Chalkperson » Tue Aug 04, 2009 8:59 pm

Anders Wik wrote:I bought Andsnes just two weeks ago. So I have just heard it once and it worked quite well. No Gilels perhaps but...
My blindtestings will prove more interesting surely. What about Richter and PC1 ? Have anybody heard him in that concerto ?
Richter never recorded the Brahms Piano Concerto No.1, he may never even have played it... :wink:

There are seven Recordings of the Brahms Second Piano Concerto...

Kondrashin 1950
Munch 1960
Leinsdorf 1960
Mravinsky 1961
Rossi 1962
Enescu 1964
Mazaal 1969
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Ken » Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:59 pm

Anders Wik wrote:Yepp. It is. I really think only Chailly (Freire) and Sawallish (Kovacevich) come close....but just close.
So I will probably not miss it.
I was quite frankly blown away when I first heard Freire and Chailly's recording of the First Concerto. Highly dramatic and a vast soundstage, and Freire's determined playing (some might say it verges on stubborn) makes for a seemingly personalized recounting of the Concerto. What a great recording! Easily my pick as my favourite recording of the First Concerto, and I'm glad to hear that others also hold it in high esteem.

In the Second, I have no clear favourite, but lean now towards Richter/Leinsdorf on RCA.
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Ken » Wed Aug 05, 2009 12:02 am

Chalkperson wrote: There are seven Recordings of the Brahms Second Piano Concerto...

Kondrashin 1950
Munch 1960
Leinsdorf 1960
Mravinsky 1961
Rossi 1962
Enescu 1964
Mazaal 1969
That's it? They cut them off after 1970 rolled around? :wink:
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Chalkperson » Wed Aug 05, 2009 12:50 am

For the First, Gilels and Friere for sure...but don't forget Sir Clifford Curzon with Szell, I have never heard Querti although I have it on order...
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by maestrob » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:40 am

Brahms PC I: Van Cliburn/Leinsdorf/Boston or Szell/Curzon or Szell/Fleisher

Brahms PC II: Richter/Leinsdorf/Boston or Hamelin/Litton/Dallas

I have a very severe problem with the Nelson Friere/Chailly set of both concerti. I really don't care how many awards they've won, and let me first say I admire these artists in other performances.

But together, they don't mesh: there's too much taffy-pulling going on with inconsistent tempi, and that unsettles me. I listened once or twice to these, then gave up. Not my cuppa.

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Lance » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:58 am

I've got to put my two cents worth in. So much depends on what you generally think of the pianist and/or the conductors/orchestra, but essentially, it should be all three. Some pianists relate to Brahms more than they might in Chopin; then there are some who relate to both supremely well. You might be surprised at some of my recommendations, but then again, maybe not.

[1] PC #1: Sony Classical 35850 - Lazar Berman, Chicago SO, Leinsdorf. For me, everything seemed to be "right" in this recording of the Brahms PC #1 in D Minor. I don't think it is currently available, but if you can find it, go for it. I thought it to be outstanding in every way. Berman is at his absolute finest here.

[2] PCs 1 & 2: Sony Classical 42261/42262 [plus subsequent reissues] - Rudolf Serkin, Cleveland Orchestra, Szell. This is some of the best Rudolf Serkin I have ever heard, along with his Schubert Op. Posth. Sonatas in A and B-flat.

[3] PCS 1 & 2: Sony Classical 46272/46273 - Rudolf Serkin, Philadelphia Orchestra, Ormandy. Again, among the finest performances ever recorded of both concertos. Serkin didn't seemingly play a lot of Brahms, however, in the concertos, he excelled.

[4] PCs 1 & 2: Sony Classical 63225 - Leon Fleisher, Cleveland Orchestra, Szell. Like Fleisher's Beethoven complete piano concertos, this is a set that should probably be a staple item of truly great performances.

[5] PC #1: Decca 425 082 - Clifford Curzon, London SO, Szell. Curzon was an introspective pianist of the top rank. Another great recording.

[6] PC #2: DGG 427 778 - Edwin Fischer, Berlin PO, Furtwängler. I have a great passion for Fisher and for Furtwängler. They just never let me down.

[7] PCs 1 & 2: DGG 447446 - Emil Gilels, Berlin PO, Jochum. Another "standard" version for truly superb performances.

[8] PC #1: DGG 447 978 - Wilhelm Kempff, Konwitschny. Kempff is a well known Brahms interpreter of especially the solo music. Sometimes he leaves me cold in the solo works, but I thought this collaboration to be excellent.

[9] PCs 1 & 2: EMI 69177/69178 - Claudio Arrau, Philharmonia Orchestra, Giulini. Normally, I am not a passionate follower of Arrau, but his early recordings were especially fine (on EMI). These, too, leave one with something special.

[10] PC #2: EMI 73248 - Sviatoslav Richter, Orchestre de Paris, Maazel. One of the really good recordings with Maazel at the helm. Richter, as always, bring something unique to his interpretations.

[11] PC #2: RCA 5406 (also 60536, others) - Emil Gilels, Chicago SO, Reiner. Great forces, great pianist, great sound. Wouldn't want to be without it. A "dream" collaboration.

[12] PC #2: RCA 56518 - Sviatoslav Richter, Chicago SO, Leinsdorf. Yep, another I had to have. Great music making here.

[13] PC #1: RCA 5668 (or 61263, other reissues) - Artur Rubinstein, Chicago SO, Reiner. This is one of the very special Rubinstein performances, originally issued in mono and eventually in early stereo. One note on the piano is out of tune (surprisingly) which hampers my enjoyment just a tad. The forces are incredible, nonetheless.

[14] PC #2: RCA 5671 (also reissues) - Artur Rubinstein, RCA SO, Joseph Krips. One of Rubinstein's early recordings, and like his first traversal of the Beethoven five concertos, Rubinstein's tone is glorious. Krips was an outstanding collaborator.

[15] PC #2: RCA 60322 - Artur Rubinstein, Boston SO, Munch. Again, great forces at work and a memorable performance in every way.

[16] PCs 1 & 2: - Solomon, Philharmonia/Kubelik (#1); Philharmonia/Dobrowen (#2). Testament 1041/1042. (Original EMI recordings.) Staple items for completely no-nonsense performances by one of the supreme pianists of all time.

That's some recommendations for now, at least on major labels. Due to time constraints, will come back to this for other recordings worth considering, at least in my humble opinion.
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by slofstra » Wed Aug 05, 2009 2:19 pm

too much taffy-pulling going on with inconsistent tempi
:lol: :lol: Great visual!

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by slofstra » Wed Aug 05, 2009 2:25 pm

One note on the piano is out of tune (surprisingly) which hampers my enjoyment just a tad.
One note or one key, Lance? Great review, BTW.

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Wallingford » Wed Aug 05, 2009 2:29 pm

Here's a real underdog, as far as the Second Concerto's concerned:

GYORGY SANDOR.
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Never mattered we were always ok
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Trilogy » Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:31 pm

I really like Gilels / BPO circa. '72 & '76.

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combine with thought, as it is forced in most arts and
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capacity to make each inner impulse audible without the
assistance of reason...Music presents at once the intensity
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Lance » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:22 pm

One note = one key! But it is OBVIOUSLY out-of-tune, unfortunately. At the moment, I cannot recall which note it was. I'd have to hear it again. But I know it is there - as do many others!
slofstra wrote:
One note on the piano is out of tune (surprisingly) which hampers my enjoyment just a tad.
One note or one key, Lance? Great review, BTW.
Lance G. Hill
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Lance » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:23 pm

Lance wrote:One note = one key! But it is OBVIOUSLY out-of-tune, unfortunately. At the moment, I cannot recall which note it was. I'd have to hear it again. But I know it is there - as do many others! And thank you, Henry, for the nice comment!
slofstra wrote:
One note on the piano is out of tune (surprisingly) which hampers my enjoyment just a tad.
One note or one key, Lance? Great review, BTW.
Lance G. Hill
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When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Lance » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:36 pm

Lance wrote:I've got to put my two cents worth in. So much depends on what you generally think of the pianist and/or the conductors/orchestra, but essentially, it should be all three. Some pianists relate to Brahms more than they might in Chopin; then there are some who relate to both supremely well. You might be surprised at some of my recommendations, but then again, maybe not.

[1] PC #1: Sony Classical 35850 - Lazar Berman, Chicago SO, Leinsdorf. For me, everything seemed to be "right" in this recording of the Brahms PC #1 in D Minor. I don't think it is currently available, but if you can find it, go for it. I thought it to be outstanding in every way. Berman is at his absolute finest here.

[2] PCs 1 & 2: Sony Classical 42261/42262 [plus subsequent reissues] - Rudolf Serkin, Cleveland Orchestra, Szell. This is some of the best Rudolf Serkin I have ever heard, along with his Schubert Op. Posth. Sonatas in A and B-flat.

[3] PCS 1 & 2: Sony Classical 46272/46273 - Rudolf Serkin, Philadelphia Orchestra, Ormandy. Again, among the finest performances ever recorded of both concertos. Serkin didn't seemingly play a lot of Brahms, however, in the concertos, he excelled.

[4] PCs 1 & 2: Sony Classical 63225 - Leon Fleisher, Cleveland Orchestra, Szell. Like Fleisher's Beethoven complete piano concertos, this is a set that should probably be a staple item of truly great performances.

[5] PC #1: Decca 425 082 - Clifford Curzon, London SO, Szell. Curzon was an introspective pianist of the top rank. Another great recording.

[6] PC #2: DGG 427 778 - Edwin Fischer, Berlin PO, Furtwängler. I have a great passion for Fisher and for Furtwängler. They just never let me down.

[7] PCs 1 & 2: DGG 447446 - Emil Gilels, Berlin PO, Jochum. Another "standard" version for truly superb performances.

[8] PC #1: DGG 447 978 - Wilhelm Kempff, Konwitschny. Kempff is a well known Brahms interpreter of especially the solo music. Sometimes he leaves me cold in the solo works, but I thought this collaboration to be excellent.

[9] PCs 1 & 2: EMI 69177/69178 - Claudio Arrau, Philharmonia Orchestra, Giulini. Normally, I am not a passionate follower of Arrau, but his early recordings were especially fine (on EMI). These, too, leave one with something special.

[10] PC #2: EMI 73248 - Sviatoslav Richter, Orchestre de Paris, Maazel. One of the really good recordings with Maazel at the helm. Richter, as always, bring something unique to his interpretations.

[11] PC #2: RCA 5406 (also 60536, others) - Emil Gilels, Chicago SO, Reiner. Great forces, great pianist, great sound. Wouldn't want to be without it. A "dream" collaboration.

[12] PC #2: RCA 56518 - Sviatoslav Richter, Chicago SO, Leinsdorf. Yep, another I had to have. Great music making here.

[13] PC #1: RCA 5668 (or 61263, other reissues) - Artur Rubinstein, Chicago SO, Reiner. This is one of the very special Rubinstein performances, originally issued in mono and eventually in early stereo. One note on the piano is out of tune (surprisingly) which hampers my enjoyment just a tad. The forces are incredible, nonetheless.

[14] PC #2: RCA 5671 (also reissues) - Artur Rubinstein, RCA SO, Joseph Krips. One of Rubinstein's early recordings, and like his first traversal of the Beethoven five concertos, Rubinstein's tone is glorious. Krips was an outstanding collaborator.

[15] PC #2: RCA 60322 - Artur Rubinstein, Boston SO, Munch. Again, great forces at work and a memorable performance in every way.

[16] PCs 1 & 2: - Solomon, Philharmonia/Kubelik (#1); Philharmonia/Dobrowen (#2). Testament 1041/1042. (Original EMI recordings.) Staple items for completely no-nonsense performances by one of the supreme pianists of all time.

Addendum: I hesitate to publicly state that rarely am I musically touched by Pollini.

That's some recommendations for now, at least on major labels. Due to time constraints, will come back to this for other recordings worth considering, at least in my humble opinion.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
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When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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Wallingford
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Wallingford » Wed Aug 05, 2009 7:18 pm

In what's so many people's fave--GILELS/REINER--in the scherzo, Gilels hits a glaring clinker (a B, I believe, added to that first D-minor chord!) right at the start.

"Duddle-uddle-ump-dump-dump-DANG!!!!!"

It always sorta put it out of top honors in my book. :(
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Heck148
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Heck148 » Wed Aug 05, 2009 10:22 pm

Wallingford wrote:In what's so many people's fave--GILELS/REINER--in the scherzo, Gilels hits a glaring clinker (a B, I believe, added to that first D-minor chord!) right at the start.

"Duddle-uddle-ump-dump-dump-DANG!!!!!"

It always sorta put it out of top honors in my book. :(
:?: :?: :!: :!:

I don't know what issue you have of this recording, but on mine he plays a d minor chord d-f-a, as is written....there is definitely no b natural in there...

Wallingford
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Wallingford » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:35 pm

Heck148 wrote:
Wallingford wrote:In what's so many people's fave--GILELS/REINER--in the scherzo, Gilels hits a glaring clinker (a B, I believe, added to that first D-minor chord!) right at the start.

"Duddle-uddle-ump-dump-dump-DANG!!!!!"

It always sorta put it out of top honors in my book. :(
:?: :?: :!: :!:

I don't know what issue you have of this recording, but on mine he plays a d minor chord d-f-a, as is written....there is definitely no b natural in there...
So far as I know, the famous "Living Stereo"-era performance......the issue I had was part of the Brahms volume of Time-Life's 1970s Great Men Of Music series that my ma subscribed to for me.

(Maybe he hit the "B" on the repeat of that section......????? :oops: )
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Chalkperson » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:40 pm

Lance wrote:Addendum: I hesitate to publicly state that rarely am I musically touched by Pollini.
It's OK, he probably has a wet fish handshake too...frozen fish that is... :mrgreen:

Bob Dylan has that lame handshake also, I was soooo disappointed... :lol:
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Lance
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Re: Brahms' piano concerto recommendations

Post by Lance » Thu Aug 06, 2009 12:15 am

Indeed, HANDSHAKES often tell a lot about a person's personality. Pollini, of course, is an highly respected artist. I just never caught on to his art. Accurate in every respect, but, somehow, cold.
Chalkperson wrote:
Lance wrote:Addendum: I hesitate to publicly state that rarely am I musically touched by Pollini.
It's OK, he probably has a wet fish handshake too...frozen fish that is... :mrgreen:

Bob Dylan has that lame handshake also, I was soooo disappointed... :lol:
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

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