A subjective question

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

A subjective question

Post by knotslip » Fri Nov 30, 2007 9:42 am

Okay, I know this will be tough for some to answer, but give it your best shot. I'm curious as to how everyone will answer and it will give me some nice works to add to my list of classical music.

If you had to choose a single piece of classical music that you would consider the most beautiful piece of music you have ever heard, what would that piece be? Please keep answers limited to the classical genre...They can be orchestral, solo, choral or opera.

I know I may get some grief for my answer but remembr I'm new and haven't heard much :D

I would have to pick Dvorak's 9th symphony as the most beautiful piece of classical music I have heard - so far. :) There are others that are real close but this one stands out for me right now.

Thanks!

johnQpublic
Posts: 1981
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 3:00 pm

Post by johnQpublic » Fri Nov 30, 2007 9:50 am

Tough question, but I'm inclined to lean in the direction of something in a major key for strings only that emphasizes rich harmonies and lush melodies. Therefore something like Borodin's "Nocturne for Strings" (from his string quartet) or maybe Tchaikovsky's "Serenade for Strings"
Image

Brahms
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:21 pm

Post by Brahms » Fri Nov 30, 2007 9:56 am

Schubert's Quintets
Schubert's Trios
Schubert Arpeggione Sonata
Brahms 2d Piano Concerto
Brahms 3d Symphony
Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata
Mozart's piano concerti (all of them)

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Post by Ralph » Fri Nov 30, 2007 10:00 am

I'm not crazy about lists of "best" anything but if I had to go with just one work, it would be Mahler's Ninth Symphony.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Fri Nov 30, 2007 10:10 am

Thanks for the replies so far. I have only heard two of the works that have beeen mentioned - Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata and some of Schubert's trios.

Ralph- It's not a question of the best piece - it's more a subjective question asking what piece of music you find most beautiful to listen to...Obviously, there are exciting pieces, and motivating pieces, and saddening pieces - but this question concerns only the most beatiful piece you have heard.

Thanks.

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17643
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Post by Chalkperson » Fri Nov 30, 2007 11:40 am

Medea Vita by John Sheppard performed by the Tallis Scholars...definately the most beautiful piece of music I own...

anasazi
Posts: 603
Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2006 11:49 pm
Location: Sarasota Florida

Post by anasazi » Fri Nov 30, 2007 11:50 am

Definitely one piece is not enough (nor is one composer) but one that I am continually fascinated by that I and nearly always enjoy is "The Lark Ascending" by RVW. And I'm not even a violinist.
"Take only pictures, leave only footprints" - John Muir.

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Fri Nov 30, 2007 1:34 pm

RVW? Rip Van Winkle?

John F
Posts: 19349
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: New York, NY

Post by John F » Fri Nov 30, 2007 1:59 pm

My desert island piece would be Mozart's "Le Nozze di Figaro."
John Francis

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17643
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Post by Chalkperson » Fri Nov 30, 2007 2:24 pm

knotslip wrote:RVW? Rip Van Winkle?
Ralph Vaughan Williams...some British guy I think... :wink:

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Fri Nov 30, 2007 3:42 pm

It would depend on when you asked me. Right now, and for quite a while now, I would find it difficult to choose between Monteverdi's Vespers of 1610 and Reynaldo Hahn's songs as sung by Susan Graham.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

absinthe
Posts: 3574
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 3:13 pm
Location: UK

Post by absinthe » Fri Nov 30, 2007 5:01 pm

knotslip wrote:RVW? Rip Van Winkle?
Yep, he used to compose on Catskill Mountain. Wrote some sleepy music called the Seaside Symphony.

Scafell
Posts: 86
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:46 pm

Post by Scafell » Fri Nov 30, 2007 6:12 pm

One work only - Beethoven's Piano Sonata no. 14 - first movement

Other contenders

Chopin Nocturne in C Major opus posth (but almost any Chopin nocturne would qualify)
Last edited by Scafell on Mon Dec 03, 2007 12:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Fugu

Post by Fugu » Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:00 pm

Tchaikovsky's 1st symphony.

anasazi
Posts: 603
Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2006 11:49 pm
Location: Sarasota Florida

Post by anasazi » Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:23 pm

Chalkperson wrote:
knotslip wrote:RVW? Rip Van Winkle?
Ralph Vaughan Williams...some British guy I think... :wink:
Yep. Sorry I made an assumption there. I will stick to the long names in the future. :lol:
"Take only pictures, leave only footprints" - John Muir.

DavidRoss
Posts: 3384
Joined: Mon May 30, 2005 7:05 am
Location: Northern California

Post by DavidRoss » Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:28 pm

One piece, most beautiful. Very tough. I'm torn among perennial favorites. One sure contender is the work my wife and I refer to as "our song": Sibelius's 5th Symphony.

And since you're seeking recommendations for beautiful music to broaden your horizons, and have given us a standard of beauty--Dvorak's Symphony From the New World--to measure by, I'll venture another: Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez.

Edit: Wait a minute! One piece, most beautiful--duh! Debussy's Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

piston
Posts: 10767
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:50 am

Post by piston » Fri Nov 30, 2007 10:03 pm

It is very subjective in my case. I grew up in Quebec watching "les beaux Dimanche," beautiful Sundays, an evening tv program devoted to the fine arts. The music theme of this show was Nielsen's fourth movement of his third symphony. To this day, I get goosebumps listening to that very noble, very powerful "nordic" music. My second favorite is also derived for tv conditioning in my youth. It's the autumn music of Glazunov's The Seasons which served as the music theme to a tv series on French-Canadian pioneers in northern Quebec.

Panzerfaust
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2006 9:04 pm
Location: New England

Post by Panzerfaust » Fri Nov 30, 2007 10:25 pm

Wagner - Parsifal

Sibelius - Symphony No. 4

Górecki - Symphony No. 3
Workers of the World Unite!
Agitate for Global Revolution and the Dictatorship of the Proletariat!

SONNET CLV
Posts: 623
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:28 am
Location: Paradise, Montana

Re: A subjective question

Post by SONNET CLV » Fri Nov 30, 2007 11:17 pm

knotslip wrote:... a single piece of classical music that you would consider the most beautiful piece of music you have ever heard, what would that piece be?

Beauty is what drew me to classical music several decades ago, and it is what keeps me an avid listener today. There is so much.

From Allegri's haunting choral work the Miserere through such works as Mozart's Flute and Harp Concerto and Beethoven masterpieces as the opening of the Moonlight Sonata and the second movement of the Seventh Symphony, the A Major Opus 18 Intermezzo of Brahms, so much of Bach (such as the Siciliano from the Oboe Concerto), the Tchaikowsky Fifth Symphony, Gerald Finzi's Cello Concerto, Samuel Barber's haunting Violin Concerto, Korngold's Violin Concerto and Symphony, William Alwyn's Fourth Symphony (final movement!), Ravel's Concerto in G and String Quartet, Debussy's String Quartet, Alan Hovhaness's Celestial Gate and [/i]Mysterious Mountain[/i] Symphonies, Rachmaninov's Second Symphony and Second and Third Concerti, Arvo Pärt's Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten, Benjamin Britten's Simple Symphony, Sibelius's Second Symphony, the slow movement of Shostakovich's Second Piano Concerto, Vaughan Williams's Second and Fifth Symphonies ... ah, just so much ....

However, my initial thought upon reading your question hovered towards one work which I have loved dearly for years: Howard Hanson's Symphony No. 2 the Romantic. This remains one of my most oft listened to pieces ... and I even enjoy simply reading the score with maybe John Cage's 4'33" playing in the background. You must hear this Symphony! Must, must, must!

Still ... for absolute sheer beauty of the sublimely profound sort, there is nothing in my musical listening experience -- nothing! -- that can match the final pages of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 10, especially as it is performed in Deryck Cooke's version by Wyn Morris and the NPO on a 1976 Philips recording. This is certainly what Longinus meant by "the sublime".

Though the Mahler Tenth was left incomplete by Gustav himself, he did manage to fully orchestrate that sublime string section I refer to. This is pure Mahler, and it provides as close a glimpse of Heaven as I, at least, can imagine ... and I remain a Dante scholar of sorts who has traversed the Paradiso section of the Divine Comedy. I know Heaven when I see it ... or hear it!

There is nothing that can follow that Mahler music, which is why I will sit dumb following each playing of the work. And which is also why I keep a copy of Frank Zappa's performance of Cage's 4'33" handy -- 'cause I gotta play somethin' after the Mahler Tenth. Somethin'!

Though Wyn Morris's traversal of this music remains my favorite, James Levine gets somewhat close in his Philadelphia Orchestra reading. One neat thing about the Mahler Tenth is that it has been completed (or finished) by several different folks, so fresh hearings move beyond mere interpretative differences. Orchestrations differ. Structure differs. Yet, the final pages as scored by Mahler himself generally remain in tact, and provide for music's most sublime moment yet.

This is the Everest. It's what Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner were building towards. Only Schoenberg could follow it. And Schoenberg's mountain is built on a different planet from Mahler's, but that's another story.

Anyhow ... them's my apples. Or my apple.

--SONNET CLV (currently listening to K. Penderecki's St. Luke's Passion on a Polskie Nagrania disc from 1989) --

arglebargle
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2007 11:16 pm
Location: Vancouver, Canada

Post by arglebargle » Sat Dec 01, 2007 2:21 am

An impossible task since one finds beauty in context, I believe, depending on one's circumstances. At different times, the greatest beauty may be found in emotional response, perhaps the evocation of a memory connected with something loved or admired, or may be found in something intellectual like mathematical precision or ingenious invention - depending on one's mood. In any case, here's a few samples which may not be otherwise mentioned:

Bach, Well Tempered Clavier, Prelude in C, BWV 846
Haydn, Quartet, Op. 76 no. 5, 2nd movement
Beethoven, Quartet Op. 130, 4th movement
Mozart, Sinfonia Concertante K364, 1st movement
Mozart, Divertimento K563, 2nd or 6th movements
Liszt, Transcendental Etudes, Paysage or Ricordanza
Sorabji, Piano Sonata No. 4, 2nd movement

absinthe
Posts: 3574
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 3:13 pm
Location: UK

Post by absinthe » Sat Dec 01, 2007 3:53 am

I think it comes down to Honneger's Pastorale d'Eté because of its associations with a film I once made on ciné about summer, blue skies and cornfields and a fairly beautiful girl. It was one of those times that the rapport between photographer, subject and setting and music made itself felt without doubt. Though I haven't watched the film in ages I'll never forget the image whenever summer starts to show itself.

.

ichiro
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:05 pm
Location: Vancouver BC

Post by ichiro » Sat Dec 01, 2007 4:50 am

For me, I can list a few

Brahms Violin Sonata no. 2

The slow movement of Beethoven's 9th

Schumann's Fantasistucke Piano Suite

Chopin's Ballades


I also definitely agree with Mozart's Piano Concertos (esp 17-27). Stunning clarity of piano writing and nimbly orchestrated.


By the way, on a tangential though not totally unrelated note, watch Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon for one of the most beautiful films ever made.

val
Posts: 1039
Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 5:46 am
Location: Lisbon

Post by val » Sat Dec 01, 2007 7:28 am

BEETHOVEN: Piano Sonata opus 106

Brahms
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:21 pm

Post by Brahms » Sat Dec 01, 2007 7:29 am

arglebargle wrote: Mozart, Sinfonia Concertante K364, 1st movement
Gotta agree, except that I wouldn't limit this to the 1st mvt (2d mvt is sublimely beautiful).

I would also add Brahms Violin Concerto.

MaestroDJS
Posts: 1713
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 1:15 pm
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States, North America, Earth, Solar System, Milky Way Galaxy, Universe

Post by MaestroDJS » Sat Dec 01, 2007 10:43 am

Decisions, decisions. I tend to consider beauty as a surface characteristic of music, one of many facets that makes music great, so I'll limit my choices accordingly. This question came at an appropriate time because I've been reading parts of Vom Musikalisch-Schönen [Of Beauty in Music] by the Viennese music critic Eduard Hanslick (eventually I'll inflict part of my translation on this forum). I've had to think about this question, and it comes down to the music on 2 recordings in my collection. The problem is that these are out-of-print LPs which I found in discount bins and which probably have not been transferred to CD.

Orchestral music:

In February 1960, Leopold Stokowski made a triumphant return to the Philadelphia Orchestra as a guest conductor. This resulted in 2 of the most "beautiful" recordings I've ever found. About 10 years ago I found a 2nd-hand LP in nearly pristine condition of El amor brujo by Manuel de Falla (with Shirley Verrett-Carter, Mezzo-Soprano) and the Love Music from Acts II and III of Tristan und Isolde by Richard Wagner. Stokowski conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in stupendous stereo sound, and Stokowski himself prepared the symphonic synthesis of Wagner's music. Rumor has it that the musicians had tears in their eyes when Stokowski returned to Philadelphia as a guest conductor. These might not themselves be considered the most beautiful pieces of music ever written, and they might not technically be the best performances either. However the way Stokowski works his intoxicatingly stupendous sonic magic, this is the most rapturous and sensual record in my classical collection. Never have I heard a more beautifully ecstatic sounding recording of anything. Oh it's so gorgeous.

Chamber music:

This choice might come as a complete surprise to many of you. Then again, if you know my rather adventurous tastes, maybe not. During vacations north of the border, I regularly excavated record stores in Ontario and Québec looking for interesting composers in Canada. In Montréal I chanced upon a vintage LP by the Amadeus Quartet of the charming but conventional String Quartet in C Minor by Sir Ernest MacMillan, coupled with a short piece which absolutely bowled me over: Two Sketches on French Canadian Airs for string quartet (later also arranged for string orchestra). Anything performed by the Amadeus Quartet is well worth a listen, and they recorded these pieces for Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft to commemorate the centennial of Canada in 1967. MacMillan was primarily a conductor, pianist and teacher, and his relatively few compositions are rather conservative, but his best-known work, Two Sketches on French Canadian Airs, is just about perfect.

Sir Ernest MacMillan (1893-1973):
Two Sketches on French Canadian Airs [Deux Esquisses sur des Chants Canadiens Français]
I. Notre Seigneur en pauvre [Our Lord in beggar's guise]: Andante tranquillo
II. À Saint-Malo: Allegro con spirito
Sir Ernest MacMillan wrote:It was about 1925 that I first made the acquaintance of Dr. Marius Barbeau who was already widely known in anthropological circles for his extensive and continuously growing collection, compiled for the National Museum of Canada, of French Canadian chansons. Our acquaintance rapidly ripened into a warm friendship and I took great delight in making use of such songs as thematic material in my compositions.

Both of the present sketches are based on songs from Folk Songs of French Canada edited by Marius Barbeau and Edward Sapir and published in 1925 by Yale University Press. They were written for the Québec Folk Festival of 1927, sponsored by the Canadian Pacific Railway and first played at that festival by the Hart House String Quartet.

The first sketch tells the well-known legend (found in many variants) of Christ disguising himself as a beggar. He is brusquely refused by the rich miser but is welcomed by his pregnant wife who gives him food and shelter. The beggar pronounces doom on the rich man and promises salvation to the open hearted woman.

The melody being modal, has been treated modally in my sketch, with frequent pauses for modulation.

The second sketch, built on a lively song very popular in Québec, pictures the Breton port of Saint-Malo from which so many of the early settlers in Canada, beginning with Jacques Cartier, originally set sail. Three large ships carrying oats and wheat arrive to discharge their cargo. The sailors call for bids, the women at the dock-side drive a hard bargain but more or less get their way.
These recordings have not been reissued on CD, but a few recordings of Two Sketches on French Canadian Airs are available in its string orchestra arrangement. The first of these two sketches is short, poetic and hauntingly beautiful with its rich yet surprisingly simple modal harmonies and melodies.
Last edited by MaestroDJS on Sat Dec 01, 2007 2:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.
David Stybr, Personal Assistant and Der Webmeister to Denise Swanson, New York Times Best-Selling Author
http://www.DeniseSwanson.com
~ Devereaux's Dime Store Mysteries ~ Book 2: Nickeled-and-Dimed to Death, March 2013
~ Scumble River Mysteries ~ Book 15: Murder of the Cat's Meow, October 2012
Penguin ~ Obsidian ~ Signet, New York, New York

Donaldopato
Posts: 1900
Joined: Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:27 am
Location: Kansas City
Contact:

Post by Donaldopato » Sat Dec 01, 2007 10:50 am

Just one?? Well, they always say to stick with the first thing that enters your mind:

"Notturno" (Piano Trio in Eb D897) op Posthumous by Schubert.

Serene, beautiful, elegant... about the best 10 minutes of music ever...in my humble opinion.

However... I do agree with SonnetCLV that the Mahler 10th, imperfect and compromised as it is, is the ne plus ultra of musical experiences in total.
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

piston
Posts: 10767
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:50 am

Post by piston » Sat Dec 01, 2007 11:20 am

Ozawa also did a recording of the Two Sketches with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (Columbia M2S-756). It's too bad Marius Barbeau was not a composer! Equipped with the Edison recording machine, he basically did the kind of field work that Bartok and others accomplished in eastern Europe, collecting over six thousand folkloric songs and their variations.

slofstra
Posts: 8900
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Contact:

Post by slofstra » Sat Dec 01, 2007 12:03 pm

A lot of interesting posts. I'm going to have to check out Sir Ernest after that review. One doesn't hear much about him anymore, and I have wondered what his music is like.

The question is problematic. But you have stated beautiful as opposed to exciting or sad. Sad or melancholic music, which I'm inclined towards, can be very beautiful. Such as "Au fond du temple saint" by Bizet or Barber's "Vioin Concerto" mentioned above. The definition of 'beautiful' can be taken to be synonymous with 'best'. If I looked at a list of personal favourites in music, I would see nothing on it I would not consider "beautiful".

But what people are usually referring to when they speak of "beautiful" music in the narrow sense of the word, is melody. And in this narrow sense of the word, the most beautiful music would have to be:

The waltzes of Johann Strauss,
Various arias of Puccini,
Some works of Tchaikovsky, esp Nutcracker and Sleeping Beauty but also the Symphonies, Cappricio Italienne,
Certain very melodic pieces of Mozart including "Eine kleine nachtmusik", "Exsulate jubilate", "Turkish Rondo" and much more.
Lyric Pieces of Grieg,
Songs without Words of Mendelssohn.

Personally, I find I can take only so much of such music at a go, although I do enjoy all of the above very much. These are really the dessert toppings of the classical music world. They are also the pieces that bring people into classical music, and for many listeners, their interest goes no further.

MaestroDJS
Posts: 1713
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 1:15 pm
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States, North America, Earth, Solar System, Milky Way Galaxy, Universe

Post by MaestroDJS » Sat Dec 01, 2007 2:40 pm

piston wrote:It's too bad Marius Barbeau was not a composer! Equipped with the Edison recording machine, he basically did the kind of field work that Bartok and others accomplished in eastern Europe, collecting over six thousand folkloric songs and their variations.
Very interesting career!

Canadian Museum of Civilization - Scholars - Marius Barbeau
English - http://www.civilization.ca/academ/barbeau/baineng.html
Français - http://www.civilization.ca/academ/barbeau/bainfra.html
David Stybr, Personal Assistant and Der Webmeister to Denise Swanson, New York Times Best-Selling Author
http://www.DeniseSwanson.com
~ Devereaux's Dime Store Mysteries ~ Book 2: Nickeled-and-Dimed to Death, March 2013
~ Scumble River Mysteries ~ Book 15: Murder of the Cat's Meow, October 2012
Penguin ~ Obsidian ~ Signet, New York, New York

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Dec 01, 2007 7:18 pm

Brahms wrote:
arglebargle wrote: Mozart, Sinfonia Concertante K364, 1st movement
Gotta agree, except that I wouldn't limit this to the 1st mvt (2d mvt is sublimely beautiful).
:) I heard that piece for the first time, sitting on the floor at the base of a giant pillar in DCs National Cathedral, soaking wet from a sudden summer thunderstorm that drove the orchestra and the audience off the South Transept grounds into the shelter of the cathedral apse. It was the piece, esp. the second movement, that made me realize Mozart was a genius.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:35 am

Wow! Thanks for all of the great replies. I have a lot of music to go explore. I have not heard most of what has been mentioned, so I look forward to hearing it all. Now, i just have to figure out where to start. :?

dulcinea
Posts: 3466
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 5:39 pm
Location: tampa, fl

Re: A subjective question

Post by dulcinea » Mon Dec 03, 2007 11:56 am

knotslip wrote:Okay, I know this will be tough for some to answer, but give it your best shot. I'm curious as to how everyone will answer and it will give me some nice works to add to my list of classical music.

If you had to choose a single piece of classical music that you would consider the most beautiful piece of music you have ever heard, what would that piece be? Please keep answers limited to the classical genre...They can be orchestral, solo, choral or opera.

I know I may get some grief for my answer but remembr I'm new and haven't heard much :D

I would have to pick Dvorak's 9th symphony as the most beautiful piece of classical music I have heard - so far. :) There are others that are real close but this one stands out for me right now.

Thanks!
:D :D :D If you like ODE TO JOY, then by all means listen to THE CREATION; 'tis an ode to joy, awe, love and every emotion there is. :D :D :D
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

Auntie Lynn
Posts: 1123
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 10:42 pm

Post by Auntie Lynn » Mon Dec 03, 2007 12:50 pm

I've got another subjective question -- what's the chances of cleaning up the top of this site. There's "Announcements" blah blah blah - time to get rid of...where's Mr. Clean??

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9801
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Re: A subjective question

Post by karlhenning » Mon Dec 03, 2007 12:53 pm

knotslip wrote:If you had to choose a single piece of classical music that you would consider the most beautiful piece of music you have ever heard . . . .
You don't have to. It's not a subjective question, it's an impossible question.

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Ken
Posts: 2511
Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 6:17 am
Location: Düsseldorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen

Post by Ken » Tue Dec 04, 2007 7:33 am

Borodin's String Quartet No. 2

OR

Brahms Violin Concerto
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

MaestroDJS
Posts: 1713
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 1:15 pm
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States, North America, Earth, Solar System, Milky Way Galaxy, Universe

Re: A subjective question

Post by MaestroDJS » Tue Dec 04, 2007 1:03 pm

karlhenning wrote:
knotslip wrote:If you had to choose a single piece of classical music that you would consider the most beautiful piece of music you have ever heard . . . .
You don't have to. It's not a subjective question, it's an impossible question.

Cheers,
~Karl
By golly, that is the best possible answer to this question. Well said, Karl.
David Stybr, Personal Assistant and Der Webmeister to Denise Swanson, New York Times Best-Selling Author
http://www.DeniseSwanson.com
~ Devereaux's Dime Store Mysteries ~ Book 2: Nickeled-and-Dimed to Death, March 2013
~ Scumble River Mysteries ~ Book 15: Murder of the Cat's Meow, October 2012
Penguin ~ Obsidian ~ Signet, New York, New York

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 17404
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Post by Lance » Tue Dec 04, 2007 1:30 pm

Yours in an impossible question to answer. It's like the woman, during the Holocaust, who was asked to give up one of her children. Of course, in reality, that is a much more impossible situation than selecting a piece of music. I would hope that I never have such a question put to me in real life. But in trying to quickly identify a work that might be an answer, I went for the first work that came into my head: Felix Mendelssohn's oratorio, Elijah. This is a magnificent piece of writing that I would chose over Handel's oratorio Messiah. Mendelssohn's choral writing within the work could only have been inspired from the highest powers, with orchestral and solo work that reaches the highest plateau.

Now, if others are having a problem trying to answer such a question, try it my way: whatever FIRST pops into your head has more meaning that you might know!
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

knotslip
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:20 pm
Location: Sunny Florida

Post by knotslip » Tue Dec 04, 2007 5:02 pm

Thanks Lance. That's all I was expecting from folks. I know it's a tough question, kind of like what's your favorite book or movie? Although, I wasn't asking for your favorite...

If you really want to think of it in a more literal sense, then answer the question as follows:

If you were on your death bed and only had the chance to hear one last piece of music before you pass on - what would you wish to hear (and don't pick some 45 minute piece just because it's longer :D)? Would I be right in guessing that Karl would choose nothing? Life is full of tough choices and questions :)

Thanks for the great responses so far.

Chalkperson
Disposable Income Specialist
Posts: 17643
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:19 pm
Location: New York City
Contact:

Post by Chalkperson » Tue Dec 04, 2007 5:39 pm

knotslip wrote:If you were on your death bed and only had the chance to hear one last piece of music before you pass on - what would you wish to hear (and don't pick some 45 minute piece just because it's longer :D)?
My choice, Medea Vita by John Sheppard, was written for exactly that purpose...it means..

And then, in midst of life, comes death...

slofstra
Posts: 8900
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Contact:

Post by slofstra » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:26 pm

knotslip wrote:Thanks Lance. That's all I was expecting from folks. I know it's a tough question, kind of like what's your favorite book or movie? Although, I wasn't asking for your favorite...

If you really want to think of it in a more literal sense, then answer the question as follows:

If you were on your death bed and only had the chance to hear one last piece of music before you pass on - what would you wish to hear (and don't pick some 45 minute piece just because it's longer :D)? Would I be right in guessing that Karl would choose nothing? Life is full of tough choices and questions :)

Thanks for the great responses so far.

999999999999999999999999999 bottles of beer on the wall.

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:28 pm

Auntie Lynn wrote:I've got another subjective question -- what's the chances of cleaning up the top of this site. There's "Announcements" blah blah blah - time to get rid of...where's Mr. Clean??
I took down four. I think the CMG meetup announcement needs to ride on top so they can coordinate easily without having to look for the thread.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

Werner
CMG's Elder Statesman
Posts: 4223
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:23 pm
Location: Irvington, NY

Post by Werner » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:42 pm

And while you're on the subject, Corlyss, what are the chances of seeing you there?
Werner Isler

DavidRoss
Posts: 3384
Joined: Mon May 30, 2005 7:05 am
Location: Northern California

Post by DavidRoss » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:44 pm

knotslip wrote: If you really want to think of it in a more literal sense, then answer the question as follows:

If you were on your death bed and only had the chance to hear one last piece of music before you pass on - what would you wish to hear
Seems like a totally different question to me. The first thing that came to mind for me in this context is Janet Baker singing Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

IcedNote
Posts: 2960
Joined: Tue Apr 04, 2006 5:24 pm
Location: NYC

Post by IcedNote » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:57 pm

Mahler, Symphony #5, fourth movement

Rachmaninoff, Vespers

Debussy, Claire de Lune

Albeniz, Mallorca

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

slofstra
Posts: 8900
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Contact:

Post by slofstra » Tue Dec 04, 2007 9:55 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
Auntie Lynn wrote:I've got another subjective question -- what's the chances of cleaning up the top of this site. There's "Announcements" blah blah blah - time to get rid of...where's Mr. Clean??
I took down four. I think the CMG meetup announcement needs to ride on top so they can coordinate easily without having to look for the thread.
And here I thought you were coming to give me 'Post of the Day' for my clever little joke ...

Jack Kelso
Posts: 3004
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 11:52 pm
Location: Mannheim, Germany

Post by Jack Kelso » Wed Dec 05, 2007 2:43 am

Picking ONE work that combines the highest inspiration, spiritual power and deep personal emotion, I have to go with:

SCHUMANN: "Szenen aus Goethes 'Faust' für Soli, Chor und Orchester"

Benjamin Britten's recording is the most intense, but I have Abbado's and it's very beautiful, too. Britten didn't conduct many other composers' works! We can be happy he loved the work so much.

Tschüß!
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Dec 05, 2007 4:17 am

slofstra wrote:And here I thought you were coming to give me 'Post of the Day' for my clever little joke ...
But Henry, you're such a gifted straightman . . . .

Yes, it was funny. :lol:
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9801
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by karlhenning » Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:06 am

Jack Kelso wrote:Picking ONE work that combines the highest inspiration, spiritual power and deep personal emotion, I have to go with:

SCHUMANN: "Szenen aus Goethes 'Faust' für Soli, Chor und Orchester"
But, Jack, where do you get the idea that there is any such thing as ONE work that combines the highest inspiration, spiritual power and deep personal emotion? Puh-leeze.

However, given that you buy that line, your answer is true to form. Eccentric in the extreme, and true to form.

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

lmpower
Posts: 877
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 2:18 pm
Location: Twentynine Palms, California

Post by lmpower » Wed Dec 05, 2007 3:04 pm

A satisfactory answer to an impossible question might be Mozart's Zauberflote.

slofstra
Posts: 8900
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Contact:

Post by slofstra » Wed Dec 05, 2007 3:50 pm

Jack Kelso wrote:Picking ONE work that combines the highest inspiration, spiritual power and deep personal emotion, I have to go with:

SCHUMANN: "Szenen aus Goethes 'Faust' für Soli, Chor und Orchester"

Benjamin Britten's recording is the most intense, but I have Abbado's and it's very beautiful, too. Britten didn't conduct many other composers' works! We can be happy he loved the work so much.

Tschüß!
Jack
Let me get this straight. It's your deathbed and you want music about selling your soul to the devil?

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 29 guests