What work have you most versions of?

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Chalkperson
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Mon Aug 11, 2008 4:52 pm

Tore wrote:First time poster, long time reader. :)
Finally Tore, you joined our little virtual village, keep posting...
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barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Mon Aug 11, 2008 5:56 pm

DavidRoss wrote: By the way, Barney--I just reread your OP. I have no problem cataloging discs with works by different composer by composer--just make a different entry for each composer (and I include the others on the disc in each file--that way I can find the Marine Corps Marching Band's Pachelbel if I happened to shelve the CD under Ligeti or Pergolesi or any other of the composers featured on the compilation disc).

And that, of course, is why we have to catalogue. So we don't lose track of such compositions. Less than half my Appassionatas are actually under Beethoven on my shelves - they are under Great Pianists, or Richter, or Mozart (because it is with a concerto) etc

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Mon Aug 11, 2008 6:01 pm

Tore wrote: I have currently 41 recordings on CD of Henry Purcell's Dido & Aeneas. A 42nd on cassette from an old 78 never released on CD. I don't think there excist a recording on CD I don't have (but please prove me wrong, as I would love to get another one).
Now that is a magnificent passion. I don't have all of anything, least of all my marbles.

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Mon Aug 11, 2008 9:25 pm

barney wrote:
Chalkperson wrote:I have Digitalized and Cataloged nearly 13,000 CD's, I still have about 3,000 to go...I have been cataloguing and ripping non stop for nearly three years, all are lossless so the sound quality is the same as CD's and I can play any one whenever I feel like hearing it, they take up about Five Terrabytes of Hard Drive Storage Space...what do I have most of...
That is formidable. The 5 terrabtyes, is that on one hard drive in an ordinary computer? Or is it on a series of portable hard drives? How do you GET 5 terrabtyes of hard drive? And 16,000 CDs!!!

I didn't include CDs I have burnt in my catalogue. I have a friend who has at least 1000 CDs he has burnt (mostly of my collection) and no qualms, but I have qualms and also - like a lot of classical people - I want the liner notes and track information.
At home they are stored on 3 Two Terrabyte drives connected to an i-Mac, at the studio we have a dedicated Computer with Four Terrabytes of INTERNAL storage and then a Two Terrabyte drive connected to that, I estimate the remaining three thousand cd's will fill up only One Terrabyte of storage space in addition to what I already have, each CD takes up approximately 350MB compared to the Original CD which is 700 MB...and of course in Storage out in Brooklyn are the Three BackUp drives...

I use Mega Drives but we as a Studio have about 65 Terrabytes of Images plus the same in BackUp, they are on 500GB Drives, a 500 GB Drive now costs $150 so Five Terrabytes costs only $1,500 to store 15,000 CD's, Ralph has about 5,000 CD's so it would cost him only $500 to store all his music...
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barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:39 pm

Chalkperson wrote:I use Mega Drives but we as a Studio have about 65 Terrabytes of Images plus the same in BackUp, they are on 500GB Drives, a 500 GB Drive now costs $150 so Five Terrabytes costs only $1,500 to store 15,000 CD's, Ralph has about 5,000 CD's so it would cost him only $500 to store all his music...
But it must have been a labour of love to copy the CDs on to the drives. How long does it take to do each one? 5000 x 5 minutes = 416 hours, plus fiddling time (getting the CD, putting it in and out, typing in whatever you type in)...

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:28 pm

barney wrote:But it must have been a labour of love to copy the CDs on to the drives. How long does it take to do each one? 5000 x 5 minutes = 416 hours, plus fiddling time (getting the CD, putting it in and out, typing in whatever you type in)...
To rip Lossless files takes about ten minutes a disc, I average five hours a night on weekdays, ten hours a day on weekends...no i'm not kidding...unfortunately...

But what a database I have, just what I need for CMG...and as you rip you remember the disc and why you bought it, but the ability to program say, all of the first movements of the Appassionata, to quote Henry, I have exactly 50, takes two seconds to find out, then I click on the ones I want to hear and it's done, as fast as any of you guys can look up a database I can have all my recordings playing, and I don't have to leave my chair to do so...you can't do that in Excel, now can you...

Plus you can now use an i-Phone as a remote although I use a remote from Logitech which has a screen so I can see the artwork, it runs a Transporter and if you came over you could never tell the difference between the CD and the Digital File...

The Remote...

http://www.slimdevices.com/

The Transporter...

http://www.slimdevices.com/pi_transporter.html
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Corlyss_D » Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:28 pm

Tore wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:So tell me, do you like Purcell's Dido & Aeneas? :lol:
Just a little :D

It's something with When I am laid in Earth that just melt me.
I know. I first heard it sung by Dame Janet Baker when I was in college. That's about the only part of it - that and the sailor's aria - that I really think a lot of. I never warmed to Purcell much.

I like the fact that you are such a fan of English music. We don't have a lot of people here who make an effort on its behalf.
Now I suppose they never will record it, since King is in prison. :cry:
Good heavens! Now what did he go and do to land him in prison? Copyright violation? I have the four volumes of King's rendering of Monteverdi's sacred music. If memory serves, it's the most complete survey of Monteverdi's output in sacred music.

Never mind. Answered my own question.

Conductor Robert King Convicted of Abusing Teenage Boys

By Matthew Westphal
June 4, 2007

(updated June 7, 2007)

Robert King, founder and director of the ensemble The King's Consort and a major figure in the period-instrument movement, has been convicted by a London jury of 14 incidents of indecent assault over an 11-year period and sentenced to almost four years in prison.

In a trial that began on May 8 in Isleworth Crown Court in London, the 46-year-old conductor was accused of 15 counts of indecent assault on five teenage boys, ranging in age from 12 to 16 at the time, over a period between 1982 (when King was 21 and had just graduated from Cambridge University) and 1995. The last of the counts was dismissed by the trial judge.

The alleged victims were all at one time students of King's at a secondary school or young musicians referred to the conductor by other teachers. The accusers claim that King touched or groped their genitals, usually in the context of some kind of wrestling or horseplay or when he was toweling them dry after a bath.

Most of the accusations allege that King got the young men drunk, with one claiming that the conductor had given him 15 bottles of beer in one hour. (To this, according to BBC News, King told the court, "I don't think I have ever seen anyone drink 15 bottles of beer in an hour.") Another said that King had given him gin, according to a report in London's Evening Standard shortly after the trial began last month.

The five accusers evidently remained silent about the abuse until sometime last year. Two of them knew "each other slightly" but there were no other connections among the five, prosecutor Sarah Whitehouse told the court early in the trial, according to the BBC. The recollections of the men were "hazy" after the passage of years but all contained "very similar features," she said.

King has denied all the charges. He was quoted by BBC News last month as telling the court that the accusations made him "nearly fall off my chair ... I thought somebody ... had gone off his rocker." He dismissed all the accusations as lies.

The jury deliberated for 21 hours over five days, according to BBC News, before finding King guilty of all 14 counts it considered.

When the verdict was announced in court today, the conductor "gasped, swayed and paled visibly," according to London's Daily Telegraph.

Judge Hezlett Colgan sentenced King to three years and nine months in prison, beginning immediately, and the conductor will have to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life. The judge did not bar King from working with children in the future, however, citing the "radical change" in King's life (marriage and fatherhood) since the time of the offenses.

Robert King founded The King's Consort in England in 1980 as part of the wave of period-instrument ensembles that revolutionized the performance of Baroque music during the final decades of the 20th century. King and his group became something of a house band with the label Hyperion Records, for which they have made 95 recordings that have sold over one million copies in total. The King's Consort's catalogue constitutes a major contribution to the general discography of Baroque music: it includes the first-ever recordings of Purcell's complete odes and welcome songs, complete sacred music and complete secular solo songs; the first period-instrument version of Vivaldi's complete sacred music, and ten of Handel's oratorios and other English-language stage works, at least five of which were the first recordings on period instruments.

Those recordings will not be pulled from the market. Hyperion's U.S. distributor, Harmonia Mundi USA, forwarded to PlaybillArts a brief statement from the label: "The recordings of The King's Consort will remain available, since they have involved the efforts of literally hundreds of first-rate musicians and it does not seem fair or appropriate to restrict their work from sale. Mr. King does not receive income from continuing sales of Hyperion CDs." The group's most recent recording, of Handel's Nine German Arias with soprano Carolyn Sampson, has just been issued in Europe and will be released in the U.S. in July.

The King's Consort itself will evidently continue its work as planned, at least for the immediate future. The ensemble engaged its first Associate Director, harpsichordist Matthew Halls, last summer, and he will direct the group's next concerts: this Sunday (June 10) at the St. Pölten Baroque Music Festival in Austria, June 22 and 24 at the ION-Musica Sacra festival in Nuremberg, and July 5 to open the York Early Music Festival.

Harrison Parrott, King's management agency, has quietly removed his artist page from its website.
http://www.playbillarts.com/news/article/6591.html


The News About Robert King

I was shocked to see in The New York Times this morning the brief item about the conviction of British early music conductor Robert King on child sex abuse charges, and his sentencing to 45 months in jail. The brief Times report was short on details, but further exploration on line turned up more of the story.

King, born in 1960, was really just starting out in his professional career in his early 20s when, according to the charges, he seemed to have developed a fetish for teenage boys. King was doing teaching and so coming into contact with plenty of teenage music students, and he is accused of having seduced them with attention and liquor and then groped them, sometimes when they were sleeping, sometimes in the shower. (Nothing in the articles I've seen suggests anything as violent as rape, or even oral sex.)

All the boys in question were 12 or older at the time, so suggestions in one newspaper report of him being a pedophile are inaccurate - pedophiles go after pre-pubescent kids. None of the boys made any complaint at the time, evidently, but a few years ago, some of them, now young men in their late 20s to 30s and suffering continuing psychological problems as a result of their teen experiences, went to prosecutors with their stories, and some initial publicity to the charges brought forth others.

At the conclusion of the trial on Monday, the judge, Hezlett Colgan, dismissed one set of charges, but sent the others to the jury, which convicted on those 14 counts of "indecent assault." King has stoutly denied the charges, claiming that they were fabrications, but the jury evidently agreed with the prosecutor that the sheer number of individuals telling similar stories were unlikely to be fabrications. According to press reports, King, who evidently had trouble comprehending that this was all real, "gasped, swayed and paled visibly" when the first guilty verdict was announced. The judge sentenced him immediately, and he was taken off to jail.

According to the press reports, King is now married and a father, and his wife was present in court when the verdict was announced. Judge Colgan, observing this "change" in his lifestyle, said that although he will have to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life under British law, there is no need to place restrictions on him having contact with children in his work. Perhaps this reflects the information that King seems to have desisted from this kind of conduct more than ten years ago, so he seems not to present a danger of recidivism. Perhaps he was going through a psychological phase then that has resolved itself, in which case the jail sentence now appears rather severe. I'm wondering what the practice is in the U.K. concerning time off for good behavior or probation in such cases?

This is a tragedy for all concerned -- the young men with their psychological scars, King's family, King himself, and for British music and for all lovers of the early music repertory in which King excelled as a conductor, musicologist and writer. His recordings of sacred music by Purcell, Vivaldi and Monteverdi have a central place in my record collection, as well as his numerous recordings of Handel oratorios. He also produced several recordings by little-known contemporaries of JS Bach which was critically well-received, although I understand it didn't sell well enough to warrant extension of the series.

He had guest-conducted many orchestras and early music ensembles in the U.S., Canada, and on the continent as well as in England, and his musical work has been of the highest standard. One can imagine that this conviction and jail term puts an end to that work. His ensemble, The King's Consort, will likely be dissolved, at least for now, and one wonders whether he will be able or interested in starting it up again after he gets out. One wonders as well how much longer his recordings will be available, or whether Hyperion, for whom he did almost all of his recording over the past several decades, will keep them in print because of their high quality? Will the notoriety now attaching to his name lead to their discontinuance? (A word to the wise collector if that may be the case....) The project of recording the complete sacred works of Monteverdi has been interrupted midstream after an excellent start, and now seems unlikely to be completed.

Hyperion had themselves been recently battered by a copyright verdict in litigation with a musicologist who was seeking composer's royalties for the performing edition he helped to create for some early music recordings, feeling undercompensated by the one-time fee he received; the counsel fees, other litigation costs, and damages threatened the viability of Hyperion, but they seem to have righted themselves after a bit of uncertainty and the flow of new releases resumed. But now perhaps nothing more from King and his Consort, which will certainly affect the label's bottom line. (Their other mainstays include Marc-Andre Hamelin, Angela Hewitt, the Florestan Trio, Stephen Hough, and they had some other early music groups, but King and his Consort were a major part of the catalogue. According to one report, they recorded 95 discs for Hyperion.) http://newyorklawschool.typepad.com/leo ... bout_.html
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chosen Barley » Mon Aug 11, 2008 11:35 pm

barney wrote: I don't have all of anything, least of all my marbles.
You are funny, Barney! :lol: :lol: :lol:
STRESSED? Spell it backwards for the cure.

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Tore » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:02 am

Corlyss_D wrote:
Tore wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:So tell me, do you like Purcell's Dido & Aeneas? :lol:
Just a little :D

It's something with When I am laid in Earth that just melt me.
I know. I first heard it sung by Dame Janet Baker when I was in college. That's about the only part of it - that and the sailor's aria - that I really think a lot of. I never warmed to Purcell much.
I like the fact that you are such a fan of English music. We don't have a lot of people here who make an effort on its behalf.
British music from the 20th century are among my favourites. Elgar, Vaughan Williams, Delius, Hamilton Harty, Tippett, Arnold, Maxwell Davies, Benjamin Britten etc are my favourites.

I have had two "hallelujah episodes" with music in my my life: I can vividly remember hearing the opening of Vaughan Williams A Sea Symphony (no. 1) on a Classic CD cover dics many years ago. It was the Bryden Thomson on Chandos who was selected as the best, and it's still one of my most cheerished CDs. It starded a love affair with British music.

Elgar's The dream of Gerontius, Britten's Peter Grimes, Tippett's A Child of our time, Hamilton Harty's The Children of Lir etc are among my most loved pieces of music. And, Dido & Aeneas of cource :D

Tore
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Gary » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:16 am

Strauß's Blue Danube Waltz
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by DavidRoss » Tue Aug 12, 2008 7:02 am

Chalkperson wrote:
DavidRoss wrote:
Chalkperson wrote: Just rip the files in i-Tunes, much less work even if you don't listen to the digital files, I know it wont do LP's but i'll post a few suggestions for i-Tunes tonight...
Ack! The horror! The horror! Unless it's undergone significant improvement in the past year, iTunes offers bloody awful ripping software with lousy error correction and a terrible choice of codecs. Use ANYTHING else, like CDex, that has good error correction and will let you rip into FLAC or LAME or the lossy codec of your choice.
You just have to know how to use it...of course you are the one who still doesn't believe digital files sound better than cd's, did you see last monhs Absolute Sound by any chance... :lol:
I repeat: iTunes has lousy error correction (use CDex or EAC) and it doesn't encode into LAME (the Best lossy codec) or FLAC (the Best lossless codec)--though you can use workarounds (as I do so I can put LAME files onto my iPod). This has nothing to do with "knowing how to use it" and everything to do with "more second-rate software from Apple intended to keep kids hooked on their products."

As for your claim that digital files stored on a hard drive sound better than digital files stored on CDs: I thought we settled that months ago (in a series of private messages) when you acknowledged misinterpreting statements in a Stereophile article comparing high-resolution digital to redbook CD. Bits is bits. Get enough of 'em, at a high enough sample rate, and the sound gets almost as good as analog, regardless of whether they're stored on optical media or pixie dust.

No, I don't read The Absolute Sound--but just like before, if you send a link to the article, I will be happy to read it to see just what it really says.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

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barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Tue Aug 12, 2008 9:12 am

Actually, I mislead everyone. I just spent the just hour counting up works in double figures in my catalogue, and Appassionata is top along with the fourth piano concerto, but with 17, not 23. My apologies.

Here's my10 or more versions list: I didn't realise how piano-centric it was.

Beethoven: Piano concerto 1 -12 versions, 3 – 13, 4 – 17, 5 -12, sym 5 – 13, sym 7 -14, vln con -16, pathetique sonata 12, moonlight sonata – 15, tempest 10, waldstein 12, appassionata 17, hammerklavier 11, sta 30 -15, 31 – 13, 32 -18,
Chopin: ballade 1 – 11, ballade 3 -13, ballade 4 -13, barcarole – 15, berceuse - 13, etude 3 – 11, etude 5 – 11, nocturne 1 – 10, nocturne 2 – 14, nocturne 7 – 12, nocturne 18 – 10, sonata 2 – 14, heroic polonaise 13, raindrop prelude 15
Debussy: Prelude, sunken cathedral 10, girl with flaxen hair 11
Liszt: piano sonata 12,
Mendelssohn: vln con 12
Mozart: pno con 13 – 11, pno con 20 – 16, pno con 21 – 10, pno con 23 – 14, pno con 27 – 10, vln con 3 – 10, d minor fantasia – 12, pno sta 11 – 11, pno sta 13 – 10, pno sta 15 – 10, Don Giovanni – non mi dir – 12, Figaro – 10 (Deh vieni 12, Voi che sapete 13, Non piu andrai 15, Dove sono 15, Porgi Amor 16),
Prokofiev: pno con 3 – 10,
Puccini: La boheme – mi chiamano Mimi 12, O soave fanciulla 14, Tosca – e lucevan le stele 11, Vissi d’arte 12,
Rachmaninov: pno con 2 – 14
Ravel: Gaspard de la nuit – 12
Rossini: Barber of Sevilla – Una voce poco fa – 10
Schubert: impromptu 1 – 11, 2 – 15, 3 – 16, 4 – 16, 7 – 11, pno sta 21 – 15, Wanderer fantasia – 11, An die musik – 10, Der Musensohn – 11, Die junge Nonne 10,
Schumann: Piano Concerto 11, Carnaval 11, Kreisleriana 10
Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto 1 – 10, Vln con - 12

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Imperfect Pitch » Tue Aug 12, 2008 9:16 am

DavidRoss wrote:iTunes has lousy error correction (use CDex or EAC) and it doesn't encode into LAME (the Best lossy codec) or FLAC (the Best lossless codec)
Wait, shouldn't all lossless formats be the same, since they're ... lossless? I thought that meant they were identical in sound quality to the original CD (and therefore equal in quality to other lossless). I'm considering upgrading my default setting in iTunes from the current 192 kbps AAC, and I don't want to bother with Apple Lossless if there's something better out there. By the way, I've heard that lossless files can create playback problems on some iPods - any truth to that?

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by violinland » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:00 am

I have really enjoyed reading this thread. It is amazing how much we can find out about our fellow members and their tastes in music. As I said in my earlier post since starting to collect records I have around a 100 versions of the Beethoven VC. As I started when I was 9 years of age and that was in 1942 my collections has grown over many years. When some of our posters have collected for as many years I wonder how many versions of any one work they will have collected. Alas, I will not be around by then. But, even so I shall find a way of reading the daily Chatterbox - rely on it. One thing I do know is that CDs take up a lot less space than does my 78 rpm collection of some 12,000 sides. My wife reluctantly agree to me building an extension to house my music collection.

CHENISTON K ROLAND O.L.
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by karlhenning » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:14 am

Well, in answer to the question, probably the Shostakovich Fourth Symphony, though at <10, this reply just isn't in any of your league, is it? ; )

Cheers,
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:38 am

Imperfect Pitch wrote:
DavidRoss wrote:iTunes has lousy error correction (use CDex or EAC) and it doesn't encode into LAME (the Best lossy codec) or FLAC (the Best lossless codec)
Wait, shouldn't all lossless formats be the same, since they're ... lossless? I thought that meant they were identical in sound quality to the original CD (and therefore equal in quality to other lossless). I'm considering upgrading my default setting in iTunes from the current 192 kbps AAC, and I don't want to bother with Apple Lossless if there's something better out there. By the way, I've heard that lossless files can create playback problems on some iPods - any truth to that?
Maestro Ross is correct that FLAC files are indeed considered the best lossless files, but i-Pods won't play FLAC files, when I spoke at length to the guys at Slim Devices they said there was no audible difference between the lossless files...of course you could do AIFF files that are exactly the same size as the original CD, Meastro Ross is suspicious of anything that Apple does, my answer to that is that they would not have put all their money into producing their own kind of lossless files if they did not think they could do a good jobs (sic)...I don't use my i-pods except when travelling, I have never had any problems playing lossless files...Maestro Ross will hopefully give you his opinon so you have a balanced (sic) viewpoint...
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:40 am

DavidRoss wrote:No, I don't read The Absolute Sound--but just like before, if you send a link to the article, I will be happy to read it to see just what it really says.
Sorry, I thought you did otherwise I would not have mentioned it, it's not an article it's an entire issue devoted to Digital Music Reproduction...
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by DavidRoss » Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:42 am

Imperfect Pitch wrote:
DavidRoss wrote:iTunes has lousy error correction (use CDex or EAC) and it doesn't encode into LAME (the Best lossy codec) or FLAC (the Best lossless codec)
Wait, shouldn't all lossless formats be the same, since they're ... lossless? I thought that meant they were identical in sound quality to the original CD (and therefore equal in quality to other lossless). I'm considering upgrading my default setting in iTunes from the current 192 kbps AAC, and I don't want to bother with Apple Lossless if there's something better out there. By the way, I've heard that lossless files can create playback problems on some iPods - any truth to that?
What makes FLAC better than Apple Lossless, and one of the things that makes LAME better than Apple's AAC, is TRANSPORTABILITY. Apple's codecs are proprietary and have relatively little support outside of Apple. LAME and FLAC are defacto standards with very wide support, meaning that if you rip your files into one of these formats, you will be able to play them back on almost anything.

The other issue is error correction. ITunes sucks as a ripper (unless they're improved it in the ~1 1/2 years since I've used it for anything other than transferring LAME files (ripped in CDex) to my iPod). I prefer my compressed files without artifacts, so use the slow-but-perfect error correction in EAC or CDex.

Insofar as playback, the issue with iPods is the small memory buffer requiring the hard drive to spin up frequently if you're playing large files. This shortens battery life and, if the iPod is jostled while the HDD is refilling the buffer, it can cause the drive to lock up, requiring shutdown and restart.

Finally, the reason Apple developed their own lossless system is for business reasons: to get uninformed consumers "locked-in" to Apple's proprietary file format so Apple has a captive market. Ideologically and technologically I much prefer the greater freedom of choice inherent in open sources.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

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Imperfect Pitch
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Imperfect Pitch » Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:35 pm

Chalkie & David - Thanks for the info on lossless. Too bad iPods won't play FLAC because that rules it out for me. I guess I'll have to either use Apple Lossless or stick with AAC.

I'm too used to iTunes/iPod to switch brands now. What can I say, David was right about Apple's software keeping people hooked :)

Cyril Ignatius
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Tue Aug 12, 2008 2:51 pm

Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto # 2
Strauss waltzes - Blue Danube, Emporer waltz, etc....
Cyril Ignatius

hangos
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by hangos » Tue Aug 12, 2008 3:08 pm

karlhenning wrote:Well, in answer to the question, probably the Shostakovich Fourth Symphony, though at <10, this reply just isn't in any of your league, is it? ; )

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl,
Which of these recordings do you listen to the most and/or rate the highest?
I only have Ormandy's Philadelphia and Barshai's Cologne recordings (I prefer Barshai's because it's less smooth than Ormandy's).I heard Gergiev's recording on radio but was underwhelmed by it. Do you have the famous 1961 first ever recording by Kondrashin?Is it as wonderful as they say it is?
Martin

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Tue Aug 12, 2008 5:38 pm

violinland wrote:I have really enjoyed reading this thread. It is amazing how much we can find out about our fellow members and their tastes in music. As I said in my earlier post since starting to collect records I have around a 100 versions of the Beethoven VC. As I started when I was 9 years of age and that was in 1942 my collections has grown over many years. When some of our posters have collected for as many years I wonder how many versions of any one work they will have collected. Alas, I will not be around by then. But, even so I shall find a way of reading the daily Chatterbox - rely on it. One thing I do know is that CDs take up a lot less space than does my 78 rpm collection of some 12,000 sides. My wife reluctantly agree to me building an extension to house my music collection.
Ah, but if I'd included works I have 8 or 9 copies of, there would have been lots of Mahler and Stravinsky, some Haydn, and fair bit of Shostakovich. But also, I suppose, many more Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert, Bach works. What that reflects is that I came to classical music before 20th century music.
Clearly you have a long-suffering wife, or many, many good qualities, or both!

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:25 pm

DavidRoss wrote:
Imperfect Pitch wrote:
DavidRoss wrote:iTunes has lousy error correction (use CDex or EAC) and it doesn't encode into LAME (the Best lossy codec) or FLAC (the Best lossless codec)
Wait, shouldn't all lossless formats be the same, since they're ... lossless? I thought that meant they were identical in sound quality to the original CD (and therefore equal in quality to other lossless). I'm considering upgrading my default setting in iTunes from the current 192 kbps AAC, and I don't want to bother with Apple Lossless if there's something better out there. By the way, I've heard that lossless files can create playback problems on some iPods - any truth to that?
What makes FLAC better than Apple Lossless, and one of the things that makes LAME better than Apple's AAC, is TRANSPORTABILITY. Apple's codecs are proprietary and have relatively little support outside of Apple. LAME and FLAC are defacto standards with very wide support, meaning that if you rip your files into one of these formats, you will be able to play them back on almost anything.

The other issue is error correction. ITunes sucks as a ripper (unless they're improved it in the ~1 1/2 years since I've used it for anything other than transferring LAME files (ripped in CDex) to my iPod). I prefer my compressed files without artifacts, so use the slow-but-perfect error correction in EAC or CDex.

Insofar as playback, the issue with iPods is the small memory buffer requiring the hard drive to spin up frequently if you're playing large files. This shortens battery life and, if the iPod is jostled while the HDD is refilling the buffer, it can cause the drive to lock up, requiring shutdown and restart.

Finally, the reason Apple developed their own lossless system is for business reasons: to get uninformed consumers "locked-in" to Apple's proprietary file format so Apple has a captive market. Ideologically and technologically I much prefer the greater freedom of choice inherent in open sources.
That all makes a lot of sense, I had to chose between Apple Lossless and FLAC because I have twelve Mac's and six i-Pods at the studio, it was not my first choice but when the Tech Guys at Slim Devices assured me they were the same as FLAC I believed them and bought a pair of Transporters, as for i-Tunes when I said you have to learn how to use it properly I was referring to using it to catalog data, i'm working on my post to explain how to get the max out of it datawise but it will take me a few hours to get screengrabs that will fit on CMG, which is of course PC rather than Mac oriented, and of course Apple Lossless is a business decision, I merely was pointing out that Apple would not have invested all the time and money if it was not as good as FLAC, irrespective of the 'Transportability Issue'...the other point is that downloading can only get better and faster, eventually (years away) Apple Lossless will be their standard issue because they have just applied for a Patent that allows you to listen to your music library from anywhere in the World on your i-Pod without the ripped files being in the i-Pod...the future is coming fast and furious...great thread Barney, your'e a great addition to our membership...

PS, David, I have never had any problems ripping in i-Tunes, admittedly I don't use compressed files but I have never had one data issue on any of the 12,000+ cd's I have ripped, other than having to clean a twenty year old cd once in a while to get it to rip properly...once cleaned it worked fine...
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by karlhenning » Tue Aug 12, 2008 8:09 pm

hangos wrote:Karl,
Which of these recordings do you listen to the most and/or rate the highest?
I only have Ormandy's Philadelphia and Barshai's Cologne recordings (I prefer Barshai's because it's less smooth than Ormandy's).I heard Gergiev's recording on radio but was underwhelmed by it. Do you have the famous 1961 first ever recording by Kondrashin?Is it as wonderful as they say it is?
I have heard the Gergiev recording, Martin, and it is rather . . . eccentric.

The two to which I return most often are Maksim Dmitriyevich, and Andre Previn with the CSO. The Chicago brass have more solidity and magisterium than the Prague Symphony; OTOH there is some rhythmic detail which Previn doesn't quite get, that Maksim nails.

Kondrashin . . . hang on a minute . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
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Boston, Massachusetts
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bricon
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by bricon » Wed Aug 13, 2008 3:39 am

Tosca - 18 complete recordings.

barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Wed Aug 13, 2008 4:14 am

bricon wrote:Tosca - 18 complete recordings.
Very impressive indeed. Conclusions? Best set? Best Tosca? Best Scarpia?

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Gotta be Brahms Op. 83.....

Post by Jppiano » Wed Aug 13, 2008 10:25 am

Last I checked (about 10 years ago!), I had 120 commercial recordings and about 70 live performances...

Joe P.

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by ch1525 » Fri Aug 15, 2008 4:16 pm

Chalkperson wrote:i'm working on my post to explain how to get the max out of it datawise but it will take me a few hours to get screengrabs that will fit on CMG
Chalkie, I'm very much looking forward to seeing your system in action. I don't think I will ever use iTunes, but I'm sure I could apply some tips from your database to my MediaMonkey library. I currently have about 25,000 tracks in my music library, a little over 10,000 of which are classical. I have gone completely lossless with everything I add from now on recently. It is a shame, too, because before I had downloaded things in lossless and converted them to mp3 vbr. :(

I have to agree with David, I'd be very scared relying on iTunes for perfect ripping. I use EAC. You certainly have plenty of experience with ripping in iTunes, though, so maybe it's alright!

Oh, and about the topic of this thread, I don't have an exact count, but I must have the most recordings of Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No.2 or No.3. I'm surprised that isn't anybody else's top work yet!

lmpower
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by lmpower » Fri Aug 15, 2008 6:02 pm

I don't go in much for duplication, but I do own four versions of Strauss' four last songs. They are both Schwarzkopf interpretations, Christa Ludwig and Felicity Lott.

SONNET CLV
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by SONNET CLV » Fri Aug 15, 2008 6:51 pm

Chosen Barley wrote: What did you oldsters here do in the olden days before computers? :!:

From an "oldster" here.

My couple of thousand LP records are catalogued on 3X5 index cards, and it's quite a convenient catalogue. Computerized databases are nice, but I still miss the old card catalogue I'm used to from the old libraries. There's still something about being able to hold the thing in your hand and look at it.

My own LP catalogue (which includes a couple hundred of my earliest CD purchases) took a couple years to compile, once I started it. And it was both a tedious chore and great fun. It is surprising what a catalogue can reveal about one's collection.

On my shelves my LPs/CDs are generally arranged alphabetically by composer. My catalogue cards feature the composer (last name first) on the red line at the upper left hand corner. Birth, death dates, and place of birth are on the red line at upper right. If the work has multiple discs, the number is at the very top left corner. Also there is a CD if the work is CD rather than LP.

My cards list the title of the work, including any name or subtitle, the Opus number, the date of composition (where these can be had). I also list the movements by name and the timings.

Below this is the performers -- orchestra, conductor, soloist and instrument.
Then comes the label number.

Finally, at bottom of card is "coupling" -- what other work or works are on the particular CD. Included with multiple works (especially those by different composers) is a notice of "Filed under" to tell me which composer the work is shelved under.

Also ... I use different color cards for particular works. Symphonies are on yellow cards, Violin Concertos on Green, Piano Concertos on Salmon, String Quartets on Blue, Piano Sonatas on Violet. The essence of the system is that it actually keeps track of works, and even in box sets I will have a card for each individual work.

I did this catalogue (which is several thousand cards extensive) for a couple of years until I just stopped one day ... sometime during the new keyboard/computer era. My cards were typed on my old Xerox Memory Writer or Royal Typewriter, and the new-fangled computer printers had no way to print out notecards.

I've been meaning to transfer everything to a computer database, but never got to that. The task is daunting, and I guess I'd rather spend time listening to the music nowadays than cataloguing it. However, I miss the convenience of being able to access a work quickly by way of the catalogue (which would lead me directly to the shelf where it could be found). I don't know if I will ever continue my catalogue or ever complete it, but I should start dumping some of my collection or soon my home will begin to sink into the ground and I may be forever lost in the abodes of Hell with my stereo system and some several thousand LPs and CDs. Which doesn't sound like too bad of an end, eh?

--SONNET CLV-- (Who has many versions of many things, especially the war horse pieces, but who is proud to own some dozen copies of Gorecki's Third Symphony)

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Lance » Fri Aug 15, 2008 8:38 pm

Between CDs and LPs, I have around 120 "Emperor" Concertos by Beethoven. Beethoven wins again with some 90 "Appassionata" sonata recordings.
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chosen Barley » Fri Aug 15, 2008 10:52 pm

You have a most orderly mind, Sonnet. Whilst I have only about 200 records, nevertheless I kind of enjoy sorting & listing & cataloguing for its own sake, and have to decide if I want to do it by computer (my son would have to figure this out for me) or your method. I, too, like having something in my hand to read and hold on to.

If you find yourself in the "abodes of Hell" it will be hot and all that plastic will melt. Listening to beautiful music will be the least of your concerns, doncha think. In any case, I sure appreciate your taking the trouble to describe what "oldsters" did before computers.

Are you serious about "dumping" some of your records? Is there a trading or buying/selling section here? I have a warped record that I want to replace but can't find it anywhere.

Some people here have thousands & thousands of records, even more than you, and I often wonder how you can buy all those records AND manage to buy food, pay rent, etc. Something somewhere has to be sacrificed. I also wonder if you folks ever get out of the house or just stay home & listen to music all the time.
STRESSED? Spell it backwards for the cure.

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Sat Aug 16, 2008 1:15 am

I have to agree with David, I'd be very scared relying on iTunes for perfect ripping. I use EAC. You certainly have plenty of experience with ripping in iTunes, though, so maybe it's alright!
What is it with you guys and Apple..ADS I suppose...see Corlyss for Details... :mrgreen:
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barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Sat Aug 16, 2008 6:14 pm

SONNET CLV wrote:(Who has many versions of many things, especially the war horse pieces, but who is proud to own some dozen copies of Gorecki's Third Symphony)
I find it hard to believe that the symphony has been recorded a dozen times. What amazing things you learn on this site. I know it got famous through traffic jams - people stuck in traffic and listening to the radio found it calming, and that's a fine if unintended achievement...

barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Sat Aug 16, 2008 6:19 pm

Lance wrote:Between CDs and LPs, I have around 120 "Emperor" Concertos by Beethoven. Beethoven wins again with some 90 "Appassionata" sonata recordings.
New record! 120!

So, how often do you listen to the Emperor. Once a month? Once a week? Has there been a CMG thread on the Emperor? If not, tell me which performances are the most different, which you like and why? Which do you turn to at moments of stress?

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by karlhenning » Sat Aug 16, 2008 9:38 pm

I think a chap named Kwoon appeared here at CMG in the past.

He collects Rakhmaninov Third (I think it is) Concertos . . . fellow's got more than 260 by now.

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Lance » Sat Aug 16, 2008 10:10 pm

barney wrote:
Lance wrote:Between CDs and LPs, I have around 120 "Emperor" Concertos by Beethoven. Beethoven wins again with some 90 "Appassionata" sonata recordings.
New record! 120!

So, how often do you listen to the Emperor. Once a month? Once a week? Has there been a CMG thread on the Emperor? If not, tell me which performances are the most different, which you like and why? Which do you turn to at moments of stress?
Hi, Barney ... and did I welcome you yet to CMG? We're happy you are here. The problem in answering your question is that I am so enamoured with so many pianists that it is always difficult to just pick one, even for the 'desert island.' But my first thoughts of pianists playing the "Emperor" usually go to Clifford Curzon, Rudolf Serkin, Solomon (elegantly understated in comparison to others, but most effective), Artur Rubinstein (only with Krips conducting, Rubinstein's first recording of the work of three commercial recordings), Kempff (with van Kempen/mono only), and Benno Moiseiwitisch (live, his last recording). If you asked me for my favs on the Beethoven G Major (4th Concerto), there would be different responses though with a few of the above names still listed. Interestingly, Artur Rubinstein is often not perceived as a great Beethoven exponent, but I have always found his complete Beethoven concertos (with Krips) to be some of his finest and most profound playing.
Lance G. Hill
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rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Sun Aug 17, 2008 1:18 am

karlhenning wrote:I think a chap named Kwoon appeared here at CMG in the past.

He collects Rakhmaninov Third (I think it is) Concertos . . . fellow's got more than 260 by now.

Cheers,
~Karl
That'sfrom the sublime to the ridiculous, isn't it? That's a taxonomical endeavour, not a musical one. But you have to admire it.

barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Sun Aug 17, 2008 1:27 am

Lance wrote:Hi, Barney ... and did I welcome you yet to CMG? We're happy you are here. The problem in answering your question is that I am so enamoured with so many pianists that it is always difficult to just pick one, even for the 'desert island.' But my first thoughts of pianists playing the "Emperor" usually go to Clifford Curzon, Rudolf Serkin, Solomon (elegantly understated in comparison to others, but most effective), Artur Rubinstein (only with Krips conducting, Rubinstein's first recording of the work of three commercial recordings), Kempff (with van Kempen/mono only), and Benno Moiseiwitisch (live, his last recording). If you asked me for my favs on the Beethoven G Major (4th Concerto), there would be different responses though with a few of the above names still listed. Interestingly, Artur Rubinstein is often not perceived as a great Beethoven exponent, but I have always found his complete Beethoven concertos (with Krips) to be some of his finest and most profound playing.
Thank you, you did. I'm going to listen to Curzon/Knappertsbusch tonight. My Kempff is the one with Leitner, but I know the van Kempen one is very highly regarded. I reckon the Leitner one is pretty good - but you don't esteem that so highly?

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by CharmNewton » Sun Aug 17, 2008 9:13 am

Lance wrote: ...Artur Rubinstein (only with Krips conducting, Rubinstein's first recording of the work of three commercial recordings) ... Interestingly, Artur Rubinstein is often not perceived as a great Beethoven exponent, but I have always found his complete Beethoven concertos (with Krips) to be some of his finest and most profound playing.
Did the CD issue do much to improve the sound of the Rubinstein/Leinsdorf recordings? For me, Rubinstein had a piano sound that worked well in the Emperor, much like Casadesus and Rosbaud. But the LPs sounded opaque and fuzzy, and one had the choice between DynaGroove and DynaFlex pressings. Listening to Leinsdorf's Beethoven Ninth, that performance is a winner on CD. I was wondering: were the concerti similarly improved, or is the set with Krips one of the highlights of the Rubinstein discography?

John

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Sun Aug 17, 2008 11:07 am

ch1525 wrote:
Chalkperson wrote:i'm working on my post to explain how to get the max out of it datawise but it will take me a few hours to get screengrabs that will fit on CMG
Chalkie, I'm very much looking forward to seeing your system in action. I don't think I will ever use iTunes, but I'm sure I could apply some tips from your database to my MediaMonkey library. I currently have about 25,000 tracks in my music library, a little over 10,000 of which are classical.
A reader writing into Stereophile's Letters Page thinks i-Tunes Maxes Out at 15,000 tracks, I have over 183,000 tracks or 581 days...still working on post, but, I have Saks Xmas Gift Brochures to do next week, I love he fact that, for us, Xmas arrives in August...
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barney
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Mon Aug 18, 2008 2:38 am

Chalkperson wrote:
ch1525 wrote:
Chalkperson wrote:i'm working on my post to explain how to get the max out of it datawise but it will take me a few hours to get screengrabs that will fit on CMG
Chalkie, I'm very much looking forward to seeing your system in action. I don't think I will ever use iTunes, but I'm sure I could apply some tips from your database to my MediaMonkey library. I currently have about 25,000 tracks in my music library, a little over 10,000 of which are classical.
A reader writing into Stereophile's Letters Page thinks i-Tunes Maxes Out at 15,000 tracks, I have over 183,000 tracks or 581 days...still working on post, but, I have Saks Xmas Gift Brochures to do next week, I love he fact that, for us, Xmas arrives in August...
581 days! You''re not allowed to add anything new until you've listened to every track again...

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by slofstra » Mon Aug 18, 2008 12:03 pm

barney wrote:
karlhenning wrote:I think a chap named Kwoon appeared here at CMG in the past.

He collects Rakhmaninov Third (I think it is) Concertos . . . fellow's got more than 260 by now.

Cheers,
~Karl
That'sfrom the sublime to the ridiculous, isn't it? That's a taxonomical endeavour, not a musical one. But you have to admire it.
Here is his list - only 162 though -

http://www.geocities.com/vienna/strasse ... eeded.html

If found his home page some years ago. http://www.geocities.com/vienna/strasse/8618/

There's a lot of interesting stuff there about his collecting instincts, including graphs, pictures and opinons.

Here's a picture of a portion of his collection:

Image

I enjoy reading this paragraph from his web page.
Piano Wizard on collecting wrote:
As I got more and more advanced as a CD collector, I started to buy CDs according to certain themes. For instance, I bought all commercial recordings Horowitz made, the 180-CD Complete Mozart Edition on Philips, all of Beethoven's compositions, the entire 21-CD set of Richter's "Authorised Recordings" on Philips, all of Verdi's 28 operas, and all of Wagner's 13 operas. Even though I am much less excited about collecting CDs than I once was, I am still diligently collecting the entire "Complete Liszt" series played by Leslie Howard, the other "Complete Liszt" series on Naxos, the complete RCA Toscanini series (it's very close to completion!), among other themes. And each of these CDs will have to be obtained from the above-mentioned cheap sources. Buying CDs this way is really fun, though it can be frustrating at times, for instance I have been looking for the remaining two titles in the Toscanini Collection for over three years! But this frustration actually adds to the excitement of collecting CDs. If you are even crazier than I am, you can also try a few more approaches, including buying at least one CD of each label, buying all CDs of a particular label, and buying all versions of a particular piece (I am actually doing that for Rachmaninoff's 3rd Piano Concerto and all recorded sets of Beethoven's piano sonatas.). A more advanced collector might try something even more absurd, like buying 500 copies of the same CD and covering the walls of his/her study room with these CDs, i.e. using the CDs like a wallpaper. Buying all CDs with catalog numbers that end with the digit "3" is another approach. Buying all CDs with attractive women on the cover is something I have been doing. The most advanced collector will just go ahead and buy one or more copies of each CD ever released, including out-of-print ones. This is VERY difficult. It's not just a matter of whether you have enough money or not. Many out-of-print CDs are very hard to find, for example I have been looking for Ohlsson's Rach 3 on Nuova Era for a long time. And there are many CDs that have never been seen in the market in America (Italy, Russia and Japan in particulr have a lot of weird stuff). The greatest CD collector in the world probably has only around 10% of all classical CDs! And I guess I have less than 0.1%!
Love the advanced collecting scenarios. :) :)

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Ken » Mon Aug 18, 2008 12:12 pm

That's a portion of Stereophile's collection?! Goodness me... :oops:
Du sollst schlechte Compositionen weder spielen, noch, wenn du nicht dazu gezwungen bist, sie anhören.

James

Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by James » Mon Aug 18, 2008 12:23 pm

slofstra wrote:Image
More money than brains...

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Mon Aug 18, 2008 2:05 pm

Piano Wizard on collecting wrote:
As I got more and more advanced as a CD collector, I started to buy CDs according to certain themes. For instance, I bought all commercial recordings Horowitz made, the 180-CD Complete Mozart Edition on Philips, all of Beethoven's compositions, the entire 21-CD set of Richter's "Authorised Recordings" on Philips, all of Verdi's 28 operas, and all of Wagner's 13 operas. Even though I am much less excited about collecting CDs than I once was, I am still diligently collecting the entire "Complete Liszt" series played by Leslie Howard, the other "Complete Liszt" series on Naxos, the complete RCA Toscanini series (it's very close to completion!), among other themes. And each of these CDs will have to be obtained from the above-mentioned cheap sources. Buying CDs this way is really fun, though it can be frustrating at times, for instance I have been looking for the remaining two titles in the Toscanini Collection for over three years! But this frustration actually adds to the excitement of collecting CDs. If you are even crazier than I am, you can also try a few more approaches, including buying at least one CD of each label, buying all CDs of a particular label, and buying all versions of a particular piece (I am actually doing that for Rachmaninoff's 3rd Piano Concerto and all recorded sets of Beethoven's piano sonatas.). A more advanced collector might try something even more absurd, like buying 500 copies of the same CD and covering the walls of his/her study room with these CDs, i.e. using the CDs like a wallpaper. Buying all CDs with catalog numbers that end with the digit "3" is another approach. Buying all CDs with attractive women on the cover is something I have been doing. The most advanced collector will just go ahead and buy one or more copies of each CD ever released, including out-of-print ones. This is VERY difficult. It's not just a matter of whether you have enough money or not. Many out-of-print CDs are very hard to find, for example I have been looking for Ohlsson's Rach 3 on Nuova Era for a long time. And there are many CDs that have never been seen in the market in America (Italy, Russia and Japan in particulr have a lot of weird stuff). The greatest CD collector in the world probably has only around 10% of all classical CDs! And I guess I have less than 0.1%!
Love the advanced collecting scenarios. :) :)[/quote]

Ditto. Fascinating concept of "advanced" - every CD ending in 3? I don't know when it stops being about the music, but it's a long way before that! And for the serious collector of any collectable item, isn't it supposed to be an investment that will increase in value? Don't see how this would.

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by slofstra » Mon Aug 18, 2008 2:44 pm

Ditto. Fascinating concept of "advanced" - every CD ending in 3?
Well, of course, you could go for that option, Barney, or the one with attractive women on the CD cover. Hmm, which would I choose?

:D :D :D

But how about owning one or more copies of every CD ever released. Truly the ultimate goal in collecting. Not just one copy, but "one or more".

This article is an enjoyable flight of whimsy if ever there was one.

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Chalkperson » Mon Aug 18, 2008 3:15 pm

barney wrote:Ditto. Fascinating concept of "advanced" - every CD ending in 3? I don't know when it stops being about the music, but it's a long way before that! And for the serious collector of any collectable item, isn't it supposed to be an investment that will increase in value? Don't see how this would.
Why would you buy records that you didn't want just because they end in 3 or are on Naive for example, I buy MUSIC I don't like as I keep trying to like and understand it, but I don't buy anything that I would not play, as for Rach 3 I buy all the ones by pianists I like and the odd recommendation from a mag or CMG but to be a completist in that is Nuts, sure I have over 30 Mahler Firsts or Brahms Requiem because I LIKE the piece but even then I leave out impulse buying by Conductors, Ensembles or Soloists I am not keen on, and if I read a good review of one I passed over then I go check that one out...I do however by lots of remastered recordings that I already own but that's because i'm an Audiophile and have equipment that shows the sound in it's best light (sic)...
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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by Imperfect Pitch » Mon Aug 18, 2008 4:06 pm

Chalkperson wrote:I have over 183,000 tracks or 581 days
That is astonishing. I'm up to around 23 days' worth of music on my iPod, which is less than 4% of what you have. I've got some catching up to do.

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Re: What work have you most versions of?

Post by barney » Mon Aug 18, 2008 6:05 pm

slofstra wrote: Well, of course, you could go for that option, Barney, or the one with attractive women on the CD cover. Hmm, which would I choose?

:D :D :D

But how about owning one or more copies of every CD ever released. Truly the ultimate goal in collecting. Not just one copy, but "one or more".

This article is an enjoyable flight of whimsy if ever there was one.
Yes it is. But for ones with attractive women on the cover, we are discussing the wrong genre - I don't know, but I imagine rap or some such would feature them more scantily clad. But what a price if you actually had to listen to the CD. An 18th century lady said, going to the opera is a sin that carries its own punishment. How much more would she feel that about some later musical forms?

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