Maazel Finally Gets It!

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maestrob
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Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by maestrob » Thu Sep 18, 2008 9:17 am

Hello, everyone.

As a refugee from the NYT forums, some of you may know that I've been railing against Lorin Maazel's conducting for some years now, maintaining the position that he often has no clue about how to maintain an effective tempo, especially in romantic material. The only recording of his that I like is his Cleveland Romeo & Juliet[,/i] (Prokofiev).

Well, after watching the PBS broadcast last night of opening night, I'm astounded to report that I actually enjoyed the performance immensely (Berlioz Roman Carnival; Ibert Flute Concerto w/James Galway; Tchaikovsky IV. In spite of the requisite occasional flubbed notes heard in every live performance, I'm happy to report that Maazel, in this evening at least, has reached a new understanding of tempo: steady momentum with not a hint of his trademark lingering or fussiness.

Amazing! .....and intensely gratifying! Bravi tutti!

This is my first post here, and I'm glad to make it a positive one. Thanks for the invitation, cliftwood!

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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Scott Morrison » Thu Sep 18, 2008 9:33 am

Welcome, maestrob. Your opinions are always worthwhile -- and appreciated.

I, too, was very pleased with what I heard of the NYPhil concert last night. I only heard the Tchaik 4, but thought it was a super performance. The pizzicato movement was breathtaking. And it's so nice to hear that all departments of the Philharmonic are in such good shape.
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by THEHORN » Thu Sep 18, 2008 9:41 am

I saw the PBS concert too, and enjoyed it a lot.
But I don't agree altogether with you. So far, I have heard Maazel's performances with the NY Phil. only on a number of TV and radio broadcasts. I could not find anything objectionable about any of them. They seemed pretty straightforward, and the orchestra sounded wonderful.
Yes, rubato can be exaggerated, but I've never felt that Maazel has ever gone overboard. And conductors such as
Stokowski and Mengelberg are usually PRAISED for their freewheeling rubato. Isn't this something of a double standard?
It's perfectly okay for famous conductors of the past to
apply rubato with a trowel, but conductors today aren't
allowed to take liberties.

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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Chalkperson » Thu Sep 18, 2008 9:52 am

I have rarely enjoyed Maazel's Conducting, I guess we all have Conductors we don't like and thus ignore, my dislike for Arthur Fiedler is well known, as is my opinion of Simon Rattle, Maazel completes my trio...Lance, of course disagrees on Fiedler and i'm sure i'm in a minority, but it is of course just a matter of taste...and I welcome all of you from the NYT forum to our little Virtual Village, I look forward to your contributions to this Board...
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by maestrob » Thu Sep 18, 2008 10:02 am

THEHORN/CHALKPERSON:

Yes, well, I've been railing against overdone rubato and fussiness in any conductor since the cows came home :) .

My own taste leans towards Toscanini and against Furtwangler, since that's how I chose to be trained at Juilliard. IOW, I like Szell, who kept good discipline, & I like Bernstein's Columbia recordings with NY (he could do no wrong by me in those days), and I deplore, say, Celibidache who never knew I phrase he didn't want to distort in some virtuosic manner.

I'm a very plain Jane when it comes to conducting, but then that's my taste. I'll be the first to admit that it limits my enjoyment, but I still have a library of over 4,000 great performances on CDs in all categories (vocal (mostly opera) and symphonic).

Am not one to forgive old-style conductors their liberties, not at all. Nor "new style" charlatans either.

I also agree about Sir Simon: I simply do NOT understand what all the fuss is about. His recent Mahler IX telecast was, simply put, a bad joke.

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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by jbuck919 » Thu Sep 18, 2008 10:26 am

Welcome to the forum, and you will be happy to know that the first thing you will hear is a dissenting voice. :)

By all means, rail on. I suppose it's some sort of custom to open the first concert of the season with the national anthem? If so, one that should be dropped; if not, shame on Maazel (can you imagine if they did this in Germany?). Then two huge warhorse cliches broken by the delightful Ibert, about which I'm not going to disagree with you (how about that brief duet with the concertmaster in the slow movement?). You know, the Philharmonic once had a distinguished director who had it written into his contract that he would not have to perform Tchaikovsky. Other conductors such as David Zinmann and Michael Tilson Thomas have felt the need to justify performing him. Now in his last season, Maazel decides to feature Mr. T. as though it were an important anniversary.

(P.S. Didn't James Galway once have an Irish accent?)

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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Ralph » Thu Sep 18, 2008 10:28 am

Welcome aboard! Hope you post frequently.

I reviewed the concert last night, which I attended, on the Concert Review board here.

I was not happy about Maazel's appointment, especially because of the shoddy and unprofessional treatment meted out to Kurt Masur. Maazel has never been my favorite conductor. That said, as one who rarely misses a New York Philharmonic concert, he has been better than predicted. His skills and range of repertoire are beyond question. The issue for me has always been how he pulls the music together for a cohesive performance. Overall, leading the finest orchestra in America, he has done rather well.

I am looking forward to Alan Gilbert's tenure.
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Ralph » Thu Sep 18, 2008 10:30 am

jbuck919 wrote:Welcome to the forum, and you will be happy to know that the first thing you will hear is a dissenting voice. :)

By all means, rail on. I suppose it's some sort of custom to open the first concert of the season with the national anthem? If so, one that should be dropped; if not, shame on Maazel (can you imagine if they did this in Germany?). Then two huge warhorse cliches broken by the delightful Ibert, about which I'm not going to disagree with you (how about that brief duet with the concertmaster in the slow movement?). You know, the Philharmonic once had a distinguished director who had it written into his contract that he would not have to perform Tchaikovsky. Other conductors such as David Zinmann and Michael Tilson Thomas have felt the need to justify performing him. Now in his last season, Maazel decides to feature Mr. T. as though it were an important anniversary.

(P.S. Didn't James Galway once have an Irish accent?)
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by THEHORN » Thu Sep 18, 2008 10:59 am

While distorting the music with exaggerated and arbitrary
tempo changes is bad, rigidity is no better.
It's known that composers of the romantic period such as Brahms EXPECTED conductors to use rubato freely.
Rigidity of tempo was exactly what they didn't want.
There is a story that Brahms heard a performance of h is
first symphony conducted by the legendary Hans Richter,
Wagner disciple and emanuensis and conductor of the first
complete Ring at Bayreuth.
He hated the performance. Why? It was too metronomic.
We are so concerned about "authenticity" and correct
performance practice today. But Maazel's Beethoven and
Tchaikovsky might be more authentic than many suppose.

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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Lance » Thu Sep 18, 2008 12:00 pm

Welcome to our site, Maestrob! We hope you enjoy your visits here and will become a regular contributor.

MAAZEL: He has never been at the top of my list though I have a number of his recordings and have heard him in live concerts. When I heard a now deleted RCA recording of him as a violinist [RCA 68414, "Virtuoso Violin"], I was horrified. The disc should never have been issued. I thought, for a moment, I was listening to the David Helfgott of the violin and I really do not want to be demeaning about another fellow human being who is perceived as a fine conductor. I do give him some credit; I thought his Gershwin was good and some collaborative work he did with Sviatoslav Richter, Emil Gilels, and Birgit Nilsson, among others. He's certainly an highly respected conductor and has led numerous great orchestras during his lifetime - and he's probably a fine gentleman and person. But I still don't really know what all the hype is about the conductor.
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by maestrob » Thu Sep 18, 2008 12:01 pm

THEHORN:

You'll get no argument from me on that score!~g~

I freely admit that my preference is simply that: my preference. I just think that emotion in music, as in poetry, is best expressed within a disciplined framework.

What I'm after is a buildup of emotional charge, and that, for me, happens best when tempo is steady and note values are observed.

Rubato is, of course, within limits, a necessary part of the above. Conducting like a ticking clock is decidedly NOT what I'm after. As you get to know my favorite recordings, you'll get a clearer picture. That we won't agree in that dept. is fine by me: I'm not here to convert anyone.

LANCE

Thanks for the warm welcome!

We agree on Maazel: I've never understood the hype, or, frankly, why he was chosen over other far better American conductors (Slatkin, Zinman, Myung-Whun Chung, Conlon).

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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by stenka razin » Thu Sep 18, 2008 12:38 pm

Listen to the Complete Early Berlin Philharmonic DG Original Masters Series Recordings, 1957-1962, for a different perspective on the young Maazel. I think you might all be quite impressed by maestro Maazel's taut and very excting performances. Give it a chance and you will be pleasantly surprised. :D :D :D :D ****


Contents:

Symphony No. 5 in C minor ("Fate"), Op. 67
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 6 in F major ("Pastoral"), Op. 68
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90
Composed by Johannes Brahms
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Tragic Overture, in D minor, Op. 81
Composed by Johannes Brahms
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Die Weihe des Hauses (Consecration of the House), overture for orchestra, Op. 124
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Contredanses (12) for orchestra, WoO14
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, D. 125
Composed by Franz Schubert
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 3 in D major, D. 200
Composed by Franz Schubert
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 4 in C minor ("Tragic"), D. 417
Composed by Franz Schubert
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, D. 485
Composed by Franz Schubert
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 6 in C major ("Little C Major"), D. 589
Composed by Franz Schubert
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 8 in B minor ("Unfinished"), D. 759
Composed by Franz Schubert
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 1 in E flat major, K. 16
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performed by Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Francaise
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 28 in C major, K. 200 (K. 189k)
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performed by Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Francaise
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 41 in C major ("Jupiter"), K. 551
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performed by Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Francaise
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 4 in A major ("Italian"), Op. 90
Composed by Felix Mendelssohn
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Symphony No. 5 in D major/D minor ("Reformation"), Op. 107
Composed by Felix Mendelssohn
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Roméo et Juliette, for alto, tenor, bass, chorus & orchestra ("symphonie dramatique"), H.79 (Op. 17) The Capulets Ball
Composed by Hector Berlioz
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Roméo et Juliette, for alto, tenor, bass, chorus & orchestra ("symphonie dramatique"), H.79 (Op. 17) Queen Mab: Scherzo
Composed by Hector Berlioz
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Roméo et Juliette, for alto, tenor, bass, chorus & orchestra ("symphonie dramatique"), H.79 (Op. 17) Love Scene
Composed by Hector Berlioz
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Roméo et Juliette, for alto, tenor, bass, chorus & orchestra ("symphonie dramatique"), H.79 (Op. 17) Romeo at the Capulets' Tomb
Composed by Hector Berlioz
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Romeo and Juliet, fantasy-overture for orchestra in B minor (3 versions)
Composed by Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky


Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36
Composed by Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Capriccio espagñol (Kaprichchio na ispankskiye temï), for orchestra, Op. 34
Composed by Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Romeo and Juliet, Suite No. 1 for orchestra, Op. 64 bis The Montagues and the Capulets
Composed by Sergey Prokofiev
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Romeo and Juliet, Suite No. 2 for orchestra, Op. 64 ter No. 4. Dance
Composed by Sergey Prokofiev
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Romeo and Juliet, Suite No. 2 for orchestra, Op. 64 ter No. 5. Romeo at Juliet's Tomb
Composed by Sergey Prokofiev
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Romeo and Juliet, Suite No. 2 for orchestra, Op. 64 ter No. 6. Dance of the girls from the Antilles
Composed by Sergey Prokofiev
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Romeo and Juliet, Suite No. 1 for orchestra, Op. 64 bis No. 7. Tybalt's Death
Composed by Sergey Prokofiev
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Pini di Roma (The Pines of Rome), symphonic poem, P. 141
Composed by Ottorino Respighi
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Night on Bald Mountain (Noch' na Lïsoy gore), symphonic poem, edited by Stokowski
Composed by Modest Mussorgsky
Performed by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra (Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell), for speaker ad lib & orchestra, Op. 34
Composed by Benjamin Britten
Performed by Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Francaise
Conducted by Lorin Maazel


Label: Deutsche Grammophon
ASIN: B00067GKG0

Orchestra: Berliner Philharmoniker, Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
Conductor: Lorin Maazel
Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven, Hector Berlioz, Johannes Brahms, Benjamin Britten, Felix Mendelssohn, et al.
Audio CD (February 8, 2005)
SPARS Code: A-D
Number of Discs: 8
Format: Box set
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Chalkperson » Thu Sep 18, 2008 1:04 pm

stenka razin wrote:Listen to the Complete Early Berlin Philharmonic DG Original Masters Series Recordings, 1957-1962, for a different perspective on the young Maazel. I think you might all be quite impressed by maestro Maazel's taut and very excting performances. Give it a chance and you will be pleasantly surprised. :D :D :D :D ****
Agreed, those Early Recordings show the incredible potential of the young Conducting Prodigy...
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Chalkperson » Thu Sep 18, 2008 1:05 pm

jbuck919 wrote:You know, the Philharmonic once had a distinguished director who had it written into his contract that he would not have to perform Tchaikovsky. Other conductors such as David Zinmann and Michael Tilson Thomas have felt the need to justify performing him.
MTT's recording on DG of Tchaikovsky's First Symphony is superb...
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Barry » Thu Sep 18, 2008 1:07 pm

Chalkperson wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:You know, the Philharmonic once had a distinguished director who had it written into his contract that he would not have to perform Tchaikovsky. Other conductors such as David Zinmann and Michael Tilson Thomas have felt the need to justify performing him.
MTT's recording on DG of Tchaikovsky's First Symphony is superb...
Better to sit through my 100th performance of Tchaikovsky's 5th or 6th than one performance of much of the music that "distinguished" conductor focuses on. The Orchestra here in Philly is probably more associated with Tchaikovsky than any other composer.
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Thu Sep 18, 2008 3:20 pm

maestrob wrote:THEHORN/CHALKPERSON:

Yes, well, I've been railing against overdone rubato and fussiness in any conductor since the cows came home :) .

My own taste leans towards Toscanini and against Furtwangler, since that's how I chose to be trained at Juilliard. IOW, I like Szell, who kept good discipline, & I like Bernstein's Columbia recordings with NY (he could do no wrong by me in those days), and I deplore, say, Celibidache who never knew I phrase he didn't want to distort in some virtuosic manner.

I'm a very plain Jane when it comes to conducting, but then that's my taste. I'll be the first to admit that it limits my enjoyment, but I still have a library of over 4,000 great performances on CDs in all categories (vocal (mostly opera) and symphonic).

Am not one to forgive old-style conductors their liberties, not at all. Nor "new style" charlatans either.

I also agree about Sir Simon: I simply do NOT understand what all the fuss is about. His recent Mahler IX telecast was, simply put, a bad joke.
Maestrob, your assessments of conducting are interesting, but I'm questioning a couple of your points. I have only heard some modest portion of Maazel's conducting. I have Maazels recordings of Ravel and Wagner overtures. And I have live VHS recordings of his New Years Concerts with the Vienna Philharmonic (Strauss waltzes) and New York Philharmonic with Angela Gheorghui doing Italian Opera pieces. Nothing I've heard has struck me as poorly conducted. Maybe I am missing some things, I don't know. Moreover, it was my understanding that the New York Philharmonic has some rather nice things to say about his conducting.

By the same token, I appreciate somethings about Toscanini, many of which came from reading a great biography about him. He was an admirable man and a great conductor in many ways. He was also very tempermental and known for sometimes going over the edge both in his dealings with people and his conducting. I happen to have an LP of him conducting Schubert's 9th with the NBC Orchestra, and in my estimation, the approach is clearly too blustery, and decidedly less effective than that of Karl Bohm, among others. Moreover, my understanding of Schubert's style leads me to believe that Bohm's approach is closer to Schubert's artistic temperment. That is what I see from my vantage point at least........
Cyril Ignatius

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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by GK » Thu Sep 18, 2008 10:46 pm

Re: Opening the concert season with the Star Spangled Banner

One year after the Washington Redskins won the Super Bowl, Mstislav Rostropovich opened the next concert with "Hail to the Redskins". How's that for patriotism?

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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by johnQpublic » Thu Sep 18, 2008 11:22 pm

I have the LP of Maazel's Prokofiev "Romeo & Juliet" & its good. His Sibelius 4th that I have on LP has consistantly been hailed as top notch too. Other than that, I have very little of his recordings.
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Lance » Fri Sep 19, 2008 12:15 am

stenka razin wrote:Listen to the Complete Early Berlin Philharmonic DG Original Masters Series Recordings, 1957-1962, for a different perspective on the young Maazel. I think you might all be quite impressed by maestro Maazel's taut and very excting performances. Give it a chance and you will be pleasantly surprised. :D :D :D :D ****
Yes, I made sure to get that set as soon as it was issued. The recordings were all made between 1957 and 1962. It appears on DGG 477.5254 and offers eight (8) discs in all. [Another 10-CD set appeared on DGG 459.019, which includes some of Maazel's debut recordings as well.] I only ran into that eight-CD set once and never saw it again. I have no idea if it has been dropped from the catalogue like so many others of those wonderful boxed sets Universal brought forth.

Lorin Maazel was born on March 6th, 1930. When he started leading the Berlin Philharmonic in those recordings from 1957, he was a mere 27-year-old. The Berlin Philharmonic is one of the world's greatest and most prestigious orchestras, most would agree. Around since 1882, and reformed in 1887, the BPO has a long history of having among the world's greatest conductors on the podium. That said, and to take nothing away from the young, prodigious Maazel, the orchestra certainly knows how to play. They could probably present a magnifcent concert even conductorless. The thought crosses my mind that it might be the orchestra who "conducts" the conductor more than we may ever know. (Perish the thought!) The leading of the concertmaster might have a lot to do with it as well. A 27-year-old rarely has the ability to lead a great orchestra as this in comparison to a veteran conductor. I think of the differences in music-making by a man such as Furtwängler whose recordings with the BPO or VPO and still considered paradigms. This is quite a boxed set nonetheless and allows us to hear a young "genius" who changed his musical thoughts and afterthoughts considerably with the passage of time. Perhaps Maazel was always looking for something, the most perfect interpretation, a certain sound ... whatever. Many will give him the benefit of the doubt. We cannot take away from him a career that has been successful and glorious. For many, nowadays, he seems to be doing something right yet I am not always convinced.
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Jack Kelso » Fri Sep 19, 2008 2:56 am

Maazel's Tschaikowsky cycle with the Vienna Phil. cannot be topped, in my opinion. His "Tod und Verklärung" of Strauss is equally superb.

I heared him conduct Schumann's Third on radio---and it was very strong, rhythmically excellent and the sound was marvelous. Unfortunately, I don't believe he's done all four on CD.

Tschüß!
Jack
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by DavidRoss » Fri Sep 19, 2008 7:40 am

johnQpublic wrote:I have the LP of Maazel's Prokofiev "Romeo & Juliet" & its good. His Sibelius 4th that I have on LP has consistantly been hailed as top notch too. Other than that, I have very little of his recordings.
Both excellent, IMO, John. His complete Sibelius cycle with the WP is one of the best of the more extroverted approach. I caught most of the 3rd and 4th movements of the Tcahaikovsky 4th broadcast the other night and thought it very good, showcasing the winds rather than burying them beneath thick strings, and agree with the post above about the pizzicato section, though it lacked the sprightly exuberance I enjoyed so much in the MTT/SFSO performance on Great Performances a couple of years back.
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by maestrob » Fri Sep 19, 2008 10:36 am

Cyril Ignatius:

I have only heard some modest portion of Maazel's conducting. I have Maazels recordings of Ravel and Wagner overtures. And I have live VHS recordings of his New Years Concerts with the Vienna Philharmonic (Strauss waltzes) and New York Philharmonic with Angela Gheorghui doing Italian Opera pieces. Nothing I've heard has struck me as poorly conducted. Maybe I am missing some things, I don't know. Moreover, it was my understanding that the New York Philharmonic has some rather nice things to say about his conducting.


1) The NY Phil likes him because he's a gentleman and he treats everyone with respect from the podium.

2) I like the Georghiu concert, but that was because Maazel is extremely sensitive and he was following her. AS for the Vienna New Year's concert, my guess is that they could play that rep without a conductor. Don't know the Wagner & Ravel, although I've heard reports that his Walkure at the MET was willful and slow at times.

My gripes about Maazel have been because of familiarity with both his fussiness and slow tempi not just in the opening night series of telecasts (try his Dvorak IX as an example), but also in the online concerts from AFH that appear every week on the NY Philh. website. There's a lack of cohesion in his interpretations of even the most basic romantic rep where he likes to experiment with tempi that are too slow and fuss around climactic points in the score with excessive (to my taste) rubato, a trend that has been reported over and over here in press reviews.

Maybe this concert means that a new, less egotistical approach has begun: maybe....(he said hopefully). In my experience, he's been an uneven and unreliable conductor so far. Let's see.

All this is MHO, as always.

P.S. For some of Toscanini's best conducting, I heartily recommend his Philadelphia Orchestra recordings.

Wallingford
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Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
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Re: Maazel Finally Gets It!

Post by Wallingford » Sat Sep 20, 2008 5:01 pm

I find his Respighi Roman Festivals & Pines Of Rome pretty definitive.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

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