Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

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IcedNote
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Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by IcedNote » Sun Oct 25, 2009 9:26 pm

I've just been introduced to the guy and his music...well...as much as one can be introduced to a dead person without a time machine.

In any case, what do you think of his music? He was good friends with Copland...and they both went out of their way to be champions of each other.

Thoughts?

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Sun Oct 25, 2009 9:57 pm

I have his six symphonies, the Toccata for Percussion, the Concerto for violin and orchestra, Chapultapec and a Chaconne.

Sinfonia India is by far his most popular work on disc, followed the Toccata for percussion, and his first symphony, Antigona. The rest of his recorded music only amounts to one, occasionally two, versions.

I would need to relisten to his last three symphonies, all commissioned in the USA, to refresh my memory but it is nevertheless striking that he is mainly remembered for works produced during his most "nationalistic" period, much less for his American period.
Last edited by piston on Sun Oct 25, 2009 10:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Sun Oct 25, 2009 9:58 pm

Look here for a Chavez discography:
http://craton.chez.com/musique/chavez/disc.htm
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by Lance » Sun Oct 25, 2009 10:16 pm

I don't know a lot about Carlos Chavez's music, but I have listened to some and have some recordings. This is what I've heard and have on recordings:

•Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1938)
[1] w/Maria Theresa Rodriguez, piano/New Phiharmonic Orchestra/Edwardo Mata, conductor [RCA]
[2] w/Eugene List, piano/Vienna State Opera Orchestra/Carlos Chavez, conductor [Westminster]

•Preludes for Piano Nos. 1, 2, 5, 8, 10
w/Maria Teresa Rodriguez, piano [RCA]

•Symphony #2 {"Sinfonia India"}
[1] w/Xalapa Symphony Orchestra, de la Fuente, conductor [Vox]
[2] New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein, conductor [Columbia]
[3] Mexican State Symphony Orchestra, Enrique Batiz, conductor [Varese and ASV]

•Sinfonia #5 for String Orchestra
w/MGM String Orchestra, Izler Solomon, conductor [MGM]

•Toccata for Percussion
w/MGM Percussion Ensemble, Izler Solomon, conductor [MGM]

Nothing Chavez has written has made much of an impression, but then you're talking to a guy whose musical life centers around the Baroque through the Romantic and early 20th century periods.

I would ask you, however, what attracts you to his music, or what specific compositions?
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by Wallingford » Sun Oct 25, 2009 11:16 pm

I'm a ways removed from understanding all his work, but he does have interesting ideas.
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Mon Oct 26, 2009 9:42 am

I neglected to mention the Southwest Chamber Music's 4 volume series of Carlo Chavez's complete chamber music. It's a five CD set (volume 4 includes two CDs) and the ensemble was awarded two Grammys for this worthy initiative:
Two-time GRAMMY-winner Southwest Chamber Music and Cambria Master Recordings are proud to release the first complete recording of the chamber music of Carlos Chávez. The first two releases of this cycle have earned unprecedented consecutive Grammy Awards from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Volume 1 received a 2003 Grammy Award for the Suite for Double Quartet from “The Daughter of Colchis,” a ballet written for Martha Graham. Volume 2 received a 2004 Grammy Award for the first CD recordings of the complete Soli, Energía from the 1920s, and the melodious Sonata for Four Horns. Volume 3, recipient of three Grammy nominations including “Best Classical Album” of 2005, features the complete music for percussion, with Southwest Chamber Music joined by the Tambuco Percussion Ensemble of Mexico City, and the complete music for voice and instruments with Alba Quezada and Suzanna Gúzman. Volume 4, featuring the complete music for strings and piano, received a Latin Grammy nomination for 2007 “Best Classical Album.” The completion of Chávez Cycle in 2006 celebrated the 20th Anniversary Season of Southwest Chamber Music. Read more...


Carlos Chávez
One of the founding fathers of musical life in Mexico, Carlos Chávez (1899-1978) was part of the amazing group of musicians, painters, and poets working in the 1920s and 1930s who forged what is today internationally recognized as the Mexican cultural identity. Ironically, the great Mexican composer was not interested in nationalistic music per se; the aesthetic quality was the most important issue in art for Chávez. “What is important is good music. Unless it is good, nationalistic music is worthless. Good music can be created only by good composers... For a country to have great national music, the only thing missing is the great composers to create it.”

Ana Chávez, the composers’ daughter, has graciously given Southwest Chamber Music permission to illustrate these performances and recordings of her father’s music with portraits of Chávez never seen outside of her family. There are two be Diego Rivera (from 1932 and 1946), and one each by David Alfaro Siquieros (1947) and Rufino Tamayo (undated, but probably from the late 1960s to early 70s). These portrait drawings have not been seen outside of the Chávez family according to Mrs. Chávez, who remembers, for example, Rivera presenting one of these drawings to her father on the occasion of his birthday party in 1946.
http://www.swmusic.org/recordings/chavez_series.html
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by Corlyss_D » Mon Oct 26, 2009 12:05 pm

Who?
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by karlhenning » Mon Oct 26, 2009 12:42 pm

piston wrote:I neglected to mention the Southwest Chamber Music's 4 volume series of Carlo Chavez's complete chamber music. It's a five CD set (volume 4 includes two CDs) and the ensemble was awarded two Grammys for this worthy initiative
Thanks for the head's-up! I've got the Vox box of six symphonies (the Harvard Biographical Dictionary, I think, mentions a seventh, but I cannot find any corroborative evidence of it).

Cheers,
~Karl
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by diegobueno » Mon Oct 26, 2009 12:51 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:Who?
In case you were worried, he's not the one who organized lettuce boycotts.

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by stenka razin » Mon Oct 26, 2009 12:59 pm

Chavez 'Sinfonia India' is a charming Copland like 1940's sounding Latin American piece that will blow you away. It is easy to listen to and has melodies that will stay in your mind forver. 8)
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Mon Oct 26, 2009 1:24 pm

diegobueno wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:Who?
In case you were worried, he's not the one who organized lettuce boycotts.
And he has no family in Venezuela. :lol:
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by absinthe » Mon Oct 26, 2009 1:42 pm

Mexican and South American music is within my range though I've listened to so much in the past ten years, I'm giving it a rest. Chavez is fine though I personally feel that Revuletas is more inventive. I recently acquired a recording of Symphonies 1, 2 and 4 conducted by Chavez. Bernstein also gives a good account of the Sinfonia India.

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Mon Oct 26, 2009 1:53 pm

Chavez is fine though I personally feel that Revuletas is more inventive
No question about that! Revueltas should have joined the AA.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Mon Oct 26, 2009 4:58 pm

A frequent instrumental characteristic of Chavez' chamber music is from the heavy to the exclusive use of percussion:

Xochipilli, an imaginary Aztec Music: piccolo, flute, E flat clarinet, trombone and six percussionists (percussion 1-6)

Toccata for Percussion: Six percussionists

Tambuco for Percussion: Six percussionists

Lamentaciones: mezzo-sop., piccolo, oboe, Teponaxtels, tlapauhcolcotl

Cantos de Mexico: fllute/piccolo, oboe, E Flat clarinet, trumpet, 2 violins, vihuela grande, guitarron, harp, huehuetl, sonaja, teponaxtles and marimba (X2), raspador, Indian drum and tenor drum, Pezunas venado and gong.

Antigona, apuntes para la sinfonia: piccolo, oboe, English horn, clarinet, trumpet, harp, 2 percussionists.

Partita for solo timpani: timpani.
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by THEHORN » Mon Oct 26, 2009 5:06 pm

I like what I've heard of his music so far . I have the excellent Vox two CD
set of the six symphonies with the LSO and the late Eduardo Mata , who unfortunately met an untimely end in a private plane accident in the 90s, was a pupil of Chavez, and a composer in his own wright.
Gustavo Dudamel conducted the Sinfonia India as part of the program for his NY Phil. debut recently, and one hopes he will do more Chavez in L.A. and possibly record it.
I remember the piano concerto fondly from recordings with the late Eugene List and the composer conducting and a more recent one with Mata and a female
Latin American pianist whose name I don't recall. This should definitely be taken up by some of today's leading pianists and recorded .
How about it, Emmanuel Ax, Peter Serkin, Lang Lang ? A first-rate new recording would be welcome.

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by Corlyss_D » Mon Oct 26, 2009 5:37 pm

diegobueno wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:Who?
In case you were worried, he's not the one who organized lettuce boycotts.
I know. That was Cesar with a diacritical mark. His brother?
Corlyss
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by absinthe » Mon Oct 26, 2009 6:11 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
diegobueno wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:Who?
In case you were worried, he's not the one who organized lettuce boycotts.
I know. That was Cesar with a diacritical mark. His brother?
What's that? Some sort of birthmark?

Then again....I've read some dire critical remarks here....

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by Corlyss_D » Mon Oct 26, 2009 6:21 pm

absinthe wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:
diegobueno wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:Who?
In case you were worried, he's not the one who organized lettuce boycotts.
I know. That was Cesar with a diacritical mark. His brother?
What's that? Some sort of birthmark?

Then again....I've read some dire critical remarks here....
A mark on or over or under a letter cuing native speakers to do something different with the pronunciation.
Corlyss
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thisolehouse

Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by thisolehouse » Mon Oct 26, 2009 8:10 pm

I also have the Vox Box CD set (CDX 5961) of the six symphonies with Mata and the L.S.O. Actually that is the only music by Chavez that I have heard. I found his symphonies very listenable.

Bill

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Mon Oct 26, 2009 8:27 pm

And the next time one should listen to that Vox Box set of Chavez symphonies, keep in mind that it is from a most remarkable recording session. BTW, I have tape recordings of an earlier LP boxset, with Chavez conducting all the symphonies with the Orquestra sinfonica nacional de Mexico, well before his fight with that orchestra, on CBS Mono. Unfortunately, I did not take note of the album's number. But some of these recordings, for no. 1, 2 and 4, were later reissued on Everest.
Of Symphonies and Snowflakes


by Harold Lawrence

The first of thirteen recording sessions with Eduardo Mata and the London Symphony Orchestra coincided with the onslaught of what meteorologists described as London's coldest and snowiest weather in 31 years. All forms of transportation collapsed in one form or another; there were widespread power failures; the actors in the musical, Oh, Calcutta, at the Nell Gwynne Theater refused to perform the nude scenes because of the cold; and even Big Ben stopped chiming briefly when its tower clock stuck.

All Saints Church, Tooting (South London), the site of the recording, resembled the inside of one of those glass-ball paperweights with snowflakes whirling around. Only a handful of musicians managed to get to the church on time at 10:30 am. They arrived with tales of stalled suburban trains, frozen Diesel tanks on the highway, and cars that couldn't make it out of their own driveways. Recording engineer Bob Auger, however, had taken the precaution of installing and testing his equipment in the church the night before, and it was as warm as toast when we arrived the following morning, with none of the usual electronic gremlins that have been known to plague recordists in severe wintry conditions.

Like most large churches, Tooting's reverberation period is well over two seconds at 1000 Hz, but unlike most of its counterparts, it has an extremely smooth decay. On first hearing, however, it would seem better suited to Bruckner masses or Franck tone poems than to the symphonies of Carlos Chavez, whose orchestral landscape is filled with percussion and passages marked in rapid, sometimes breakneck, tempi. Veteran recording engineer Auger (my collaborator in several recording projects with the LSO in the 1970's, including a series of albums with the late Jascha Horenstein conducting) had supervised many sessions in Tooting and learned to tame the church's acoustics, achieving a marvelous clarity of instrumental detail, while at the same time capturing the "bloom" so essential to a cohesive orchestral sound.

On a strictly musical plane, Eduardo Mata also adjusted quickly to the acoustics of the church, making subtle alterations in tempi and releases to achieve greater clarity. Totally at ease in the recording environment, he was familiar with session procedure through his previous digital recordings with the Dallas Symphony and the London Symphony. A regular guest conductor with the London Symphony, Mata has achieved a special rapport with his British colleagues. It was for this reason that he selected the LSO for the task of recording the complete symphonies of Carlos Chavez. These powerful scores call for near-virtuoso playing from almost every section of the orchestra. Violins climb to stratospheric heights in strenuous 16th note passages and high-wire harmonics; double basses invade the treble clef, reaching two F-sharps above middle C in Symphony No. 5; the E-flat clarinet plays a melody spanning three octaves with wide intervallic leaps in the Third Symphony (Finale), a passage that makes advanced post-Schoenberg orchestral writing seem like child's play; the timpanist engages in a fugal dialogue with other instruments towards the conclusion of the Scherzo movement of the Third Symphony, and the brass are required to play staccato triplets at high speeds in the first movement of the Sixth Symphony. The musicians of the LSO took personal pride in seeing that the recording went well, crowding into the control room at playbacks, practicing finger-twisting passages during breaks, and never giving less than their full attention to each take. They had to; Chavez's demanding scores spared no player.

The members of the orchestra were seated in the normal concert arrangement: violins on the left, cellos on the right, timpani in the center behind the woodwinds, horns left of center, brass right of center, and percussion on both sides of the timpani. Two Neumann U-87 microphones housed in an SM-2 unit provided the overall center pickup, with four other U-87s as frontal "outriggers". Ten additional microphones covered horns, timpani, brass, woodwinds, harps and percussion. None of the microphones, however, was used to "telescope" the sound of instruments, as in some multi-mike recordings where too close a perspective can result in aural "zooming" in which the image of the full orchestra is replaced by a succession of instrumental details. Throughout the Chavez sessions, the pickup of the total ensemble always took precedence over any internal microphone input.

In preparation for the editing of the digital master tapes, I began the fascinating task of auditioning the hundreds of takes of the sessions already completed. I arranged to begin the editing of the analog tapes at Bob Auger's studio near Henley-on-Thames on two free days between sessions (December 13-14). Another storm was predicted-and materialized. After four hours of work, the entire countryside was blanketed by several inches of snow and buffeted by harsh winds. The power failed at 4 30 pm and remained off for the next 22 hours! Luckily, I had purchased a Sony Walkman II and a pair of lightweight Koss headphones, and I had .brought with me cassette tapes of all the previous session takes. So I remained at my work table in Auger's studio, while Bob wheeled over a gas heater and Monika (Mrs. Auger) set up three candles on the table. The Auger family's four Yorkshire Terriers huddled together in front of the heater while Monika supplied me regularly with coffee, tea, biscuits and glasses of sherry.

After watching me hunched over my Chavez scores and take sheets, headphones on, scarf round my neck, plotting edits by candlelight, Bob commented on how far recorded science had progressed in this age of space technology. Later, we listened to the BBC evening news on a battery-powered radio "The temperature in Shropshire has plunged to 23 degrees below zero, the coldest recorded in England in 100 years. .. A state of emergency has been declared in Poland... A cyclone has struck parts of Bangladesh... A terrorist bomb has exploded in Connaught Square. .. and there will be more snow." After this dismal recital, the calm BBC announcer advised listeners that "goldfish in outdoor ponds can survive only if the ice is broken to let in air, but cats and pet rabbits will freeze to death if let outdoors."

The final session concluded on the evening of December 17. At the end of 510 takes and 40 hours of recording, the musicians of the LSO applauded Eduardo Mata. Leader (concertmaster) Michael Davis rose to express and total professionalism in conducting these arduous the Orchestra's warm appreciation of Mata's dedication and inspiring sessions.

These sessions were produced as VOX CUM LAUDE 3D-VCL 9032 (c1982), the Six Symphonies of Carlos Chavez.

Information on the Six Symphonies of CARLOS CHAVEZ; taken from the catalogue of his works published by the Association of Composers, edited by Rodolfo Halffter, Mexico, 1971.

SINFONIA DE ANTIGONA (1933) (Symphony No. 1). Based on the incidental music for Antigone by Sophocles, adapted by Jean Cocteau. Orchestra: 3343 / 8301 / timp-3 batt / 2 arpe / archi. Premiere: December 15, 1933, Hidalgo Theater, Mexico City; Symphony Orchestra of Mexico conducted by the composer.

SINFONIA INDIA (1935) (Symphony No. 2). Orchestra: 4343 /4220/ timp-4 batt / arpa / archi. Commissioned by William S. Paley, New York, for the Concert of Mexican Music presented by the Columbia Broadcasting System. Premiere: January 23, 1936, Columbia Broadcasting System, New York; Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by the composer.

SYMPHONY NO. 3 (1951). I. Introdozione · II. Allegro · III. Scherzo · IV. Finale. Orchestra: 3343 /4331 / timp-3 batt / arpa / archi. Commissioned by Clare Booth Luce. Premiere: December 9, 1954, Jose Angel Lamas Amphitheater, Caracas, Venezuela; Venezuela Symphony Orchestra conducted by the composer.

SYMPHONY NO. 4 (1953) (Romantic). I. Allegro · II. Molto lento · III. Vivo non troppo mosso. Orchestra: 3323/4321 / timp-3 batt / archi. Commissioned by the Louisville Symphony Orchestra, Louisville, Kentucky. Premiere: February 11, 1953, Columbia Auditorium, Louisville, KY.; Louisville Symphony Orchestra conducted by the composer. In its first performances, this symphony ended with a piece which is now a separate work entitled Baile (Dance); it was later substituted by the movement which is now the finale, written in October of 1953.

SYMPHONY NO. 5 (1953) (For String Orchestra). I. Allegro molto moderato · II. Molto lento · III. Allegro con brio. Orchestra: Violin I, violin 11, viola, violincello, basso. Commissioned by The Serge Koussevitzky Music Foundation, New York. Premiere: December 1, 1953, Royce Hall Auditorium, Los Angeles, California; Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra conducted by the composer.

SYMPHONY NO. 6 (1961). I. Allegro energico · II. Adagio molto cantabile · III. Con anima. Orchestra: 3323 /4231 / timp-2 batt / archi. Commissioned by The New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Premiere: May 7, 1964, Philharmonic Hall, Lincoln Center, New York; The New York Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstein.
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Mon Oct 26, 2009 8:49 pm

His orchestration of Buxtehude's Chaconne.
Delicious!
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by IN278S » Mon Oct 26, 2009 10:04 pm

piston wrote:BTW, I have tape recordings of an earlier LP boxset, with Chavez conducting all the symphonies with the Orquestra sinfonica nacional de Mexico, well before his fight with that orchestra, on CBS Mono. Unfortunately, I did not take note of the album's number. But some of these recordings, for no. 1, 2 and 4, were later reissued on Everest.
Aren't the Everest recordings with the Stadium Concerts Symphony of NY, and thus presumably different from the CBS ones? Even though the Mata set rather pre-empts the market for a Chavez symphony cycle (extremely cheap, excellent sound and performances) it would be good for Sony to issue its Chavez recordings, which could include his 78s for both Victor and Columbia.

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:21 am

IN278S wrote:
piston wrote:BTW, I have tape recordings of an earlier LP boxset, with Chavez conducting all the symphonies with the Orquestra sinfonica nacional de Mexico, well before his fight with that orchestra, on CBS Mono. Unfortunately, I did not take note of the album's number. But some of these recordings, for no. 1, 2 and 4, were later reissued on Everest.
Aren't the Everest recordings with the Stadium Concerts Symphony of NY, and thus presumably different from the CBS ones? Even though the Mata set rather pre-empts the market for a Chavez symphony cycle (extremely cheap, excellent sound and performances) it would be good for Sony to issue its Chavez recordings, which could include his 78s for both Victor and Columbia.
Good one! You are probably right:
The orchestra is the New York PO playing under the name it used for summer seasons at the Lewisohn Stadium, New York.
What I need to know is the date of the recordings for the CBS album which was actually issued after the Everest Record, around 1967. My mistake!
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Tue Oct 27, 2009 7:49 am

I have found the CBS box-set in question. Unfortunately, there's no reference to recording dates:
"The Six Symphonies of Carlos Chavez. Orquesta Sinfonica Nacional de Mexico conducted by the composer."
Notes by Herbert Weinstock
"These recordings were made under the sponsorship of The Honorable Augustin Yanez, Secretary of Public Education, Mexico."
Library of Congress catalog card number R67-2671(mono) and R67-2672(stereo).

CBS Mono 32 31 0001
CBS Stereo 32 31 0002
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by IN278S » Tue Oct 27, 2009 4:33 pm

Another item that I'd welcome on CD is the Violin Concerto, which the composer recorded for CBS with Henryk Szeryng as soloist. I have the CD with Pablo Diemecke, but it sounds as if the soloist is a bit uncomfortable technically. (The coupling is an excellent modern recording of the Piano Concerto, with soloist Jorge Federico Osorio.)

By the way, I've always wondered what the purpose of the CBS label was, in the US market. The only things I recall were records by Chavez and Boulez; why didn't they come out on the Columbia label in the first place? And what was with that odd catalog number series, like they also used for Odyssey and Crossroads?

US Decca also had some Chavez records. I've read that these were actually recorded in the forties, in Mexico.

#####

THE BILLBOARD, June 9, 1951, p. 12
Chavez Waxes For Decca LP's

NEW YORK, June 2. -- Decca Records has completed a deal on behalf of its longhair division, the Gold Label Series, to take over a series of matrices featuring Carlos Chavez and the Mexico City Symphony Orchestra. Deal was consummated with Chavez directly.

The matrices procured contain enough material for a group of four individual 12-inch long play releases. The first of these, La Hija de Colquida, is on the current Gold Label release. The second, which will be issued next month, is a potpourri, mainly of Chavez's own compositions, to be released under the catch-all tag, Music Of Mexico. Chavez previously has produced recordings for Victor and Columbia, a number of which today rank as choice collectors' items.

#####

(Did you know that full issues of Billboard, beginning in 1942, are available through Google Books? A valuable reference for record nuts.)

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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by Donaldopato » Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:19 pm

I have the Everest CD and the Mata set and quite enjoy the works, especially the guilty pleasure of the rhythmic and colorful Sinfonia India. :D
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:23 pm

Another item that I'd welcome on CD is the Violin Concerto, which the composer recorded for CBS with Henryk Szeryng as soloist.
Yes, I have taped that one as well. It is coupled with the orchestral version of the Chaconne.
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by piston » Tue Oct 27, 2009 7:26 pm

By the way, I've always wondered what the purpose of the CBS label was, in the US market. The only things I recall were records by Chavez and Boulez; why didn't they come out on the Columbia label in the first place? And what was with that odd catalog number series, like they also used for Odyssey and Crossroads?
I don't think it had any purpose inside the USA or in Canada. From what I'm gathering on wiki, it's an incredibly complicated legal story:
In 1961, CBS ended its arrangement with Philips Records and formed its own international organization, CBS Records, which released Columbia recordings outside the USA and Canada on the CBS label. The recordings could not be released under the "Columbia Records" name because EMI operated a separate record label by that name outside North America. (This was the result of the legal maneuvers which had led to the creation of EMI in the early 1930s.)
When Epic's distribution deal with EMI expired, CBS Records distributed Epic recordings on the Epic label outside North America as well. Epic distributed Ode Records between 1967 and 1969 and between 1976 and 1979.

With the formation of CBS Records' international arm, it started establishing its own distribution in the early 1960s beginning in Australia. In 1960 CBS took over its distributor in Australia and New Zealand, the Australian Record Company (founded in 1936) including Coronet Records, one of the leading Australian independent recording and distribution companies of the day. The CBS Coronet label was replaced by the CBS label with the 'walking eye' logo in 1963.[8] ARC continued trading under that name until the late 1970s when it formally changed its business name to CBS Australia.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

Wallingford
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by Wallingford » Wed Oct 28, 2009 10:34 am

IN278S wrote:By the way, I've always wondered what the purpose of the CBS label was, in the US market. The only things I recall were records by Chavez and Boulez; why didn't they come out on the Columbia label in the first place? And what was with that odd catalog number series, like they also used for Odyssey and Crossroads?
Odyssey was Columbia's reissue label, and Crossroads was a very short-lived subsdiary existing to issue recent Czech Supraphon albums. The whole numbering system was amalgamated in 1970, starting with the number 30000, existing for Columbia, Epic, Monument and all the others.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

IN278S
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by IN278S » Thu Oct 29, 2009 10:05 am

Wallingford wrote:
IN278S wrote:By the way, I've always wondered what the purpose of the CBS label was, in the US market. The only things I recall were records by Chavez and Boulez; why didn't they come out on the Columbia label in the first place? And what was with that odd catalog number series, like they also used for Odyssey and Crossroads?
Odyssey was Columbia's reissue label, and Crossroads was a very short-lived subsdiary existing to issue recent Czech Supraphon albums. The whole numbering system was amalgamated in 1970, starting with the number 30000, existing for Columbia, Epic, Monument and all the others.
Right. Not to completely derail the thread, but I'm still scratching my head as to why they started using those odd catalog numbers (e.g. 32 16 0055) which were unlike anything else in the CBS catalog, or why they used the CBS label in the USA at all. Anyway, I'd still welcome reissues of all those Chavez records. Maybe ArkivMusic could pick them up, if there aren't licensing problems.

Rach3
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Re: Does CMG have thoughts on Carlos Chavez?

Post by Rach3 » Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:24 am

Enjoying this am Chavez' Piano Concerto, my recording with Osario as pianist, now also at YT:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efahrHI1CUo&t=95s

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