Easter music

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kairos
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Easter music

Post by kairos » Fri Apr 02, 2010 3:50 pm

Does anyone have any special Easter music that they like? I was looking through my cds this morn and have mostly Christmas music - Josquin Desprez by the Oxford Camerata, William Byrd by The Tallis Scholars, Palestrina by The Tallis Scholars, Thomas Tallis by the Tallis Scholars. Anyway, Easter music suggestions would be welcome.

Seán
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Re: Easter music

Post by Seán » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:41 pm

As a newbie I am not the best judge of what is and is not suitable for Easter, however, I can recommend two pieces of music to you: Allegri's Miserere on the Wednesday before Easter and on Good Friday:

JS Bach
St Matthew Passion

Boys Choir of St Bavo Cathedral Haarlem,
Netherlands Chamber Choir,
Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century,
Frans Brüggen conducting.


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Last edited by Seán on Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Brendan

Re: Easter music

Post by Brendan » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:41 pm

St Matthew Passion - Bach
St John Passion - Bach
Messiah - Handel (we associate it with Christmas, but it's an Easter oratorio)
Stabat Mater - Pergolesi

Seán
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Re: Easter music

Post by Seán » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:44 pm

Brendan wrote:St Matthew Passion - Bach
St John Passion - Bach
Messiah - Handel (we associate it with Christmas, but it's an Easter oratorio)
Stabat Mater - Pergolesi
and Bach's Easter Oratorio too.
Seán

"To appreciate the greatness of the Masters is to keep faith in the greatness of humanity." - Wilhelm Furtwängler

Brendan

Re: Easter music

Post by Brendan » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:47 pm

Oddly, I don't have a copy, so cannot comfortably recommend it.

But I should have mentioned Scarlatti's Stabat Mater as well as Pergolesi's.

josé echenique
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Re: Easter music

Post by josé echenique » Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:54 pm

There´s too much glorious Easter music to name, but these masterpieces come to mind: Tomás Luis de Victoria, Requiem, the numerous Lamentationes of Couperin, Jommelli, Scarlatti, Zelenka, etc. The marvelous oratorio La Deposizione dalla Croce by Johann Joseph Fux, the Stabat Maters of Scarlatti, Pergolesi, Vivaldi, Haydn, Rossini, Poulenc etc.

Prometheus
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Re: Easter music

Post by Prometheus » Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:59 pm

Here are some Easter themed or titled works which come to mind:

Bach-Ascension Oratorio
Rimsky-Korsakov-Russian Easter Festival Overture
Haydn-Seven Last Words
Beethoven-Christ on the Mount of Olives
Dvorak-Stabat mater
Liszt-Christus
Gregorian Chant -Paschale Mysterium-This is a Naxos disc of chant for Easter.

mikealdren
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Re: Easter music

Post by mikealdren » Sat Apr 03, 2010 2:38 am

How about Cavalleria Rusticana?

Mike

david johnson
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Re: Easter music

Post by david johnson » Sat Apr 03, 2010 4:21 am

Russian Easter Overture by r/k...love it, love it, love it!

dj

jbuck919
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Re: Easter music

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Apr 03, 2010 9:13 am

It probably has not escaped everybody's attention that most of the music mentioned here is passion music. Easter per se seems somewhat under-represented in classical music, probably because it does not have great support in scriptural narrative, liturgy, or religious drama. For all that it is the most important Sunday of the Christian year, Easter is just another Mass after all the unusual and extended happenings of Holy Week.

In addition to the Bach pieces mentioned, the famous and unique cantata "Christ lag in Todesbanden" is thoroughly an Easter work, somewhat modulated to modern ears by the minor modality of Luther's hymn. (Luther must not have had a problem with this because he does the same thing with the chorale "Christ ist erstanden.")

As for Latin liturgical settings, well, of course, there is the "Et resurrexit" section of any Credo, but as for the propers of Easter, the most commonly set would be the Gradual, Haec Dies (already wonderful in its Gregorian Chant setting). Here is one by Byrd:



This is the day which the Lord has made; let us be glad and rejoice in it. Alleluia.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

maestrob
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Re: Easter music

Post by maestrob » Sat Apr 03, 2010 10:53 am

Ever since I sang the Bach B minor Mass in Carnegie Hall in 1979, I've always played a recording of this masterpiece on or around Easter.


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kairos
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Re: Easter music

Post by kairos » Sat Apr 03, 2010 5:36 pm

Thank you to everyone for all of the wonderful responses. I will be busy on youtube and Amazon for a while. The youtube clip of the Kings Singers is beautiful. Thank you, thank you.

Lance
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Re: Easter music

Post by Lance » Sat Apr 03, 2010 9:36 pm

Russian Easter liturgical music is always joyous to hear and there's quite a bit of it. It's probably my Russian blood that calls for this music.

Also, very much enjoy Rimsky-Korakov's Russian Easter Overture. Christian Friedrich Ruppe wrote an Easter Cantata (NM Records), and there is C. E. E. Weyse's Easter Cantata No. 1 (Marco Polo). JPE Hartmann [1805-1900] wrote Good Friday and Easter music [Scandinavian Classics]. There's always Wagner's Good Friday Spell from Parsifal - in fact the Parsifal Prelude is fine, too. Bach: Easter Oratorio and Easter cantatas; Beethoven: Christ on the Mount of Olives. Of course, Handel's Messiah. The Bernstein Columbia/Sony recording breaks this work into two parts, Christmas and Easter.
Lance G. Hill
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jbuck919
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Re: Easter music

Post by jbuck919 » Sun Apr 04, 2010 2:08 am

Lance wrote:Of course, Handel's Messiah. The Bernstein Columbia/Sony recording breaks this work into two parts, Christmas and Easter.[/color]
:shock: No! :wink:

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

John F
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Re: Easter music

Post by John F » Sun Apr 04, 2010 2:21 am

Brendan wrote:I should have mentioned Scarlatti's Stabat Mater as well as Pergolesi's.
And Dvorak's.
John Francis

jbuck919
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Re: Easter music

Post by jbuck919 » Sun Apr 04, 2010 6:06 am

John F wrote:
Brendan wrote:I should have mentioned Scarlatti's Stabat Mater as well as Pergolesi's.
And Dvorak's.
In the absence of dear Corlyss I feel obliged to carry the brief for Renaissance settings of this as well (and for me, preferentially).




jserraglio
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Re: Easter music

Post by jserraglio » Sun Apr 04, 2010 6:37 am

J.B. Foerster: Symphony No. 4 ("Easter Eve")

1. Molto sostenuto, a dramatic presentation of Easter eve
2. Allegro decisio, a scherzo also called "A Child's Good Friday"
3. Andante sostenuto, a meditation called "The Charm of Solitude"
4. Lento lugubre - Allegro moderato, "The Victory of Good Friday"
Carl Bauman, reviewing the Naxos issue
American Record Guide, August 2006

Foerster’s Fourth Symphony was written in Vienna in 1905 and first performed that November in Prague by Oskar Nedbal. Foerster was clearly under Mahler’s influence at the time. Foerster was a deeply religious man, and the work uses material from Easter celebrations in small Czech towns. He even goes so far as to quote a 1687 Czech hymn, ‘And on the Third Day the Creator Rose from the Dead’, as an organ solo in IV. …One doesn’t have to be religious to appreciate the masterly orchestral writing.
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val
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Re: Easter music

Post by val » Mon Apr 05, 2010 4:25 am

GESUALDO DA VENOSA: Tenebrae / Hilliard Ensemble

One of the greatest monuments of music.

Auntie Lynn
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Re: Easter music

Post by Auntie Lynn » Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:28 am

"You're No Bunny 'Til Some Bunny Loves You..."

jbuck919
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Re: Easter music

Post by jbuck919 » Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:48 am

Auntie Lynn wrote:"You're No Bunny 'Til Some Bunny Loves You..."
You're getting to be a rabbit with me. (Apologies to the ghost of Allan Sherman.)

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Cyril Ignatius
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Re: Easter music

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:01 pm

I played a lot of Russian/Eastern Orthodox music this year. Rachmaninoff Vespers. Liturgical Chants from Moscow, and so on. I also play Beethoven's 9th on Thanksgiving and on Eater Sunday.
Cyril Ignatius

kairos
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Re: Easter music

Post by kairos » Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:00 pm

Cyril Ignatius wrote:I played a lot of Russian/Eastern Orthodox music this year. Rachmaninoff Vespers. Liturgical Chants from Moscow, and so on. I also play Beethoven's 9th on Thanksgiving and on Eater Sunday.

Beethoven's 9th!!! What a wonderful idea and perfect mood fit. I love it!!!

kairos
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Re: Easter music

Post by kairos » Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:06 pm

jserraglio wrote:J.B. Foerster: Symphony No. 4 ("Easter Eve")

1. Molto sostenuto, a dramatic presentation of Easter eve
2. Allegro decisio, a scherzo also called "A Child's Good Friday"
3. Andante sostenuto, a meditation called "The Charm of Solitude"
4. Lento lugubre - Allegro moderato, "The Victory of Good Friday"
Carl Bauman, reviewing the Naxos issue
American Record Guide, August 2006

Foerster’s Fourth Symphony was written in Vienna in 1905 and first performed that November in Prague by Oskar Nedbal. Foerster was clearly under Mahler’s influence at the time. Foerster was a deeply religious man, and the work uses material from Easter celebrations in small Czech towns. He even goes so far as to quote a 1687 Czech hymn, ‘And on the Third Day the Creator Rose from the Dead’, as an organ solo in IV. …One doesn’t have to be religious to appreciate the masterly orchestral writing.
Image
Foerster's work is something that I had never even heard of before. I just found some performances of his Fourth Symphony on youtube and it is very lovely. Thank you for this suggestion.

kairos
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Re: Easter music

Post by kairos » Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:29 pm

val wrote:GESUALDO DA VENOSA: Tenebrae / Hilliard Ensemble

One of the greatest monuments of music.

I love the Hilliard Ensemble, but I had never heard any of Gesualdo Da Venosa's music. Listened to some clips on Amazon --- absolutely haunting!

Chalkperson
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Re: Easter music

Post by Chalkperson » Mon Apr 05, 2010 10:43 pm

kairos wrote:
val wrote:GESUALDO DA VENOSA: Tenebrae / Hilliard Ensemble

One of the greatest monuments of music.

I love the Hilliard Ensemble, but I had never heard any of Gesualdo Da Venosa's music. Listened to some clips on Amazon --- absolutely haunting!
Then, you should read about him...especially about the murders...the Hilliard's recording was the very first Early Music CD I bought, back in 1990...there is also a new series of discs on Glossa by La Vexiana of his Madrigals, they are also well worth hearing...

The Murders...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlo_Gesualdo

The Madrigals...

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/alb ... m_id=21004
Sent via Twitter by @chalkperson

kairos
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Re: Easter music

Post by kairos » Tue Apr 06, 2010 12:21 pm

Chalkperson wrote:
kairos wrote:
val wrote:GESUALDO DA VENOSA: Tenebrae / Hilliard Ensemble

One of the greatest monuments of music.

I love the Hilliard Ensemble, but I had never heard any of Gesualdo Da Venosa's music. Listened to some clips on Amazon --- absolutely haunting!
Then, you should read about him...especially about the murders...the Hilliard's recording was the very first Early Music CD I bought, back in 1990...there is also a new series of discs on Glossa by La Vexiana of his Madrigals, they are also well worth hearing...

The Murders...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlo_Gesualdo

The Madrigals...

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/alb ... m_id=21004

The murders ---- good heavens --- no wonder the music is haunting --- or perhaps haunted! Also just searched on youtube for a sample of the madrigals --- truly beautiful and otherwordly. This is music I definitely want to own. Thank you for the info and the links.

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