Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

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dulcinea
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Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Thu May 12, 2016 12:10 pm

Vosotros have told me about sacred pieces of the 20th, such as the Glagolitic Mass and the War Requiem.
What can you tell me about the sacred music of the 19th? Can't say I care for the Oy Vey Maria of Gounod and the Panis Satanicus of Franck, which sound to me like very bad opera; the Requiems of Berlioz and Verdi are great, but too noisy to be used in a religious context.
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Thu May 12, 2016 1:02 pm

Actually, the Gounod Ave Maria is a rather clever and effective piece. To fit a moving and contrapuntally correct descant onto the Prelude in C from Book 1 of the WTC without changing a note of the latter is no small accomplishment. I wish it were performed more, instead of the horrid contortion of words onto music that constitutes the non-Schubert Ave Maria. All the performances on YouTube are either awful or meretricious, so I will not offer one. It should be done movingly but "straight."

Bruckner's masses are pretty good, no very good, and were designed for liturgical use. A devout Catholic, he also wrote some excellent motets. Brahms, though he was an atheist, wrote many wonderful works to religious texts, not just the Requiem. And Verdi, another non-believer, wrote an incredibly sensitive setting of the Pater Noster as translated by Dante.




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maestrob
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by maestrob » Thu May 12, 2016 1:13 pm

Wow! There's so much to discuss here........

The Berlioz Requiem is a monster of a piece, and well worth your listening time. The Schubert masses are much tamer, but (to my ears anyway) deeply rewarding if you find the right recording. Why not start with this (it's only $3 on amazon):

Image

John F
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by John F » Thu May 12, 2016 2:27 pm

Second the motion for Schubert's Mass in A flat major, which may be the most lyrical setting there is. By the way, Schubert's masses are still sung in the Sunday services at Vienna's Hofburgkapelle and Stefansdom - the choir in which Schubert sang as a boy. No particularly good recording on YouTube, but this one will do.



The Mass in E flat is more imposing but, for me, less lovable.
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by Ted Quanrud » Thu May 12, 2016 6:22 pm

Several of Luigi Cherubini’s masses and his two requiem settings, as championed by Riccardo Muti, are well worth hearing.

Composed the same year that he took minor orders, Franz Liszt’s Missa Choralis is a remarkable work. Even more so is his Via Crucis, a musical setting of the Stations of the Cross.

You should also look into Antonin Dvorak’s Mass in D and his (IMO) sublime Requiem.

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by maestrob » Thu May 12, 2016 10:29 pm

JohnF:

I sang the Schubert Eb Mass with David Randolph in Carnegie Hall back in the 1970's, and loved every bar.

Ted:

The Dvorak pieces are truly magical, though rarely performed. Great music.

I should also mention Verdi's late Four Sacred Pieces: Muti's recording is a personal favorite.

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Fri May 13, 2016 4:22 am

And then there is Mendelssohn, who wrote much beyond the two oratorios. As in the two big works it is not all great, but much of it is very fine.


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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by lennygoran » Fri May 13, 2016 9:36 am

John F wrote:Second the motion for Schubert's Mass in A flat major,...
The Mass in E flat is more imposing but, for me, less lovable.
Thanks, I'll bite for both of them over the next few days. Regards, Len

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by Wallingford » Fri May 13, 2016 2:01 pm

Saint-Saens wrote a Requiem, a Mass, and a Christmas Oratorio.

Not the greatest, but still quite enjoyable.
Last edited by Wallingford on Mon Jun 20, 2016 4:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jserraglio » Sat May 14, 2016 1:52 pm

this one should make the top ten of the holy.


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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sat May 14, 2016 2:10 pm

jserraglio wrote:this one should make the top ten of the holy.

The lullaby of death nearly euthanized me, and the German Requiem wasn't much better. :x :x :x :x :x
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jserraglio » Sat May 14, 2016 2:42 pm

Faure wrote his masterpiece for fun, not the Lord.

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sat May 14, 2016 2:50 pm

jserraglio wrote:Faure wrote his masterpiece for fun, not the Lord.
Exactly what I guessed when I listened to it for the first and last time.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jserraglio » Sat May 14, 2016 3:02 pm

Well, thanks be, requiems are sorta stuck with that notion of finality.

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sat May 14, 2016 3:40 pm

jserraglio wrote:Well, thanks be, requiems are sorta stuck with that notion of finality.
I listen often to the Mozart-Sussmayr and the Verdi, which, unlike the Faure and the Brahms, are definitely not monotonous.
But let's stick to the subject: what other 19th century sacred music do you recommend, please?
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Sat May 14, 2016 4:34 pm

jserraglio wrote:Faure wrote his masterpiece for fun, not the Lord.
Exactly. If she's looking for works by men of faith, good luck. Only Bach among the important composers would qualify in a dogmatic sense, and he remains a mystery for doltish adherence to dark orthodoxy in the middle of the shining glory of the Enlightenment. Virtually every other composer, like the sheep in Messiah, went astray in one way or another. (As I pointed out in my previous post, the sexually frustrated Bruckner may be an exception.)

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

dulcinea
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sat May 14, 2016 5:25 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
jserraglio wrote:Faure wrote his masterpiece for fun, not the Lord.
Exactly. If she's looking for works by men of faith, good luck. Only Bach among the important composers would qualify in a dogmatic sense, and he remains a mystery for doltish adherence to dark orthodoxy in the middle of the shining glory of the Enlightenment. Virtually every other composer, like the sheep in Messiah, went astray in one way or another. (As I pointed out in my previous post, the sexually frustrated Bruckner may be an exception.)
Nobody of you has mentioned Monsignor Lorenzo Perosi; can't say that I'm surprised, as what I have heard by him confirms the truth of the aphorism: the best of intentions lead to the worst of art.
I have drawn my own versions of THE ANNUNCIATION, THE ADORATION OF THE SHEPHERDS, THE ADORATION OF THE MAGI, THE ANGEL WARNING ST JOSEPH, THE DEATH OF ST JOSEPH, THE CRUCIFIXION, THE RESURRECTION, and DOUBTING THOMAS, not because of good intentions, but because ideas for sacred themes just come easily to me; eventually I hope that the merit of this work of mine will be recognized.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by John F » Sat May 14, 2016 6:14 pm

What on earth can you be talking about?
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sat May 14, 2016 6:30 pm

John F wrote:What on earth can you be talking about?
The reason why sacred art in general, and sacred music in particular, are so interesting to me. Once I had a dream of a Mass composed by me; it really surprised me to realize that JM Haydn had had such an impact on my imagination.
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Sat May 14, 2016 7:37 pm

I am probably the only one here who understands the reference to Perosi. There is a universe of, well, crap that was written by Catholic composers in the 19th and earlier 20th century. It dominated ordinary parish liturgical music up to the time of Vatican II. After that. other kinds of crap took over. There are several hundred composers turning over in their graves at what became of music in the Catholic Church. I am afraid that dulcinea is looking for connections where none are to be found. The divide is absolute.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sun May 15, 2016 9:45 am

jbuck919 wrote:I am probably the only one here who understands the reference to Perosi. There is a universe of, well, crap that was written by Catholic composers in the 19th and earlier 20th century. It dominated ordinary parish liturgical music up to the time of Vatican II. After that. other kinds of crap took over. There are several hundred composers turning over in their graves at what became of music in the Catholic Church. I am afraid that dulcinea is looking for connections where none are to be found. The divide is absolute.
Since Dali is no longer around to do other pieces such as CHRIST OF SAINT JOHN OF THE CROSS, I try to supply that lack. If I were a composer, I would try to do what Perosi could not: music that the brothers Haydn would admire.
Pius X=Giuseppe Sarto preferred P over Mozart, the Haydns, and Schubert; SARTO was SORDO=DEAF.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Sun May 15, 2016 2:09 pm

dulcinea wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:I am probably the only one here who understands the reference to Perosi. There is a universe of, well, crap that was written by Catholic composers in the 19th and earlier 20th century. It dominated ordinary parish liturgical music up to the time of Vatican II. After that. other kinds of crap took over. There are several hundred composers turning over in their graves at what became of music in the Catholic Church. I am afraid that dulcinea is looking for connections where none are to be found. The divide is absolute.
Since Dali is no longer around to do other pieces such as CHRIST OF SAINT JOHN OF THE CROSS, I try to supply that lack. If I were a composer, I would try to do what Perosi could not: music that the brothers Haydn would admire.
Pius X=Giuseppe Sarto preferred P over Mozart, the Haydns, and Schubert; SARTO was SORDO=DEAF.
We're getting way off topic here, but Pius X was also the pope who issued entirely according to his own interest (hence Motu Proprio) "Inter sollicitudines" (among the concerns), the famous and entirely ineffectual document that recommended a return to Gregorian Chant and Renaissance polyphony as the basic music of the Catholic Church. We cannot call the man deaf or lacking in taste.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sun May 15, 2016 3:06 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
dulcinea wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:I am probably the only one here who understands the reference to Perosi. There is a universe of, well, crap that was written by Catholic composers in the 19th and earlier 20th century. It dominated ordinary parish liturgical music up to the time of Vatican II. After that. other kinds of crap took over. There are several hundred composers turning over in their graves at what became of music in the Catholic Church. I am afraid that dulcinea is looking for connections where none are to be found. The divide is absolute.
Since Dali is no longer around to do other pieces such as CHRIST OF SAINT JOHN OF THE CROSS, I try to supply that lack. If I were a composer, I would try to do what Perosi could not: music that the brothers Haydn would admire.
Pius X=Giuseppe Sarto preferred P over Mozart, the Haydns, and Schubert; SARTO was SORDO=DEAF.
We're getting way off topic here, but Pius X was also the pope who issued entirely according to his own interest (hence Motu Proprio) "Inter sollicitudines" (among the concerns), the famous and entirely ineffectual document that recommended a return to Gregorian Chant and Renaissance polyphony as the basic music of the Catholic Church. We cannot call the man deaf or lacking in taste.
As you yourself admit, that Philistine document did everything but improve the quality of Church music; people with good intentions have an uncanny knack for wreaking unholy Hell.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Sun May 15, 2016 5:03 pm

dulcinea wrote:People with good intentions have an uncanny knack for wreaking unholy Hell.
Ah, the voice of experience. ;)

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sun May 15, 2016 5:50 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
dulcinea wrote:People with good intentions have an uncanny knack for wreaking unholy Hell.
Ah, the voice of experience. ;)
My mother's life was utterly ruined by people of good (???) intentions who talked her into a career as a teacher--a profession for which she was totally unsuited--, and into marriage with my stepfather, who made both our lives a foretaste of Hell; that was indeed our experience.
Now that that issue is out of the way, please tell me more about sacred music of the 19th century that is worth hearing today.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Sun May 15, 2016 6:15 pm

dulcinea wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
dulcinea wrote:People with good intentions have an uncanny knack for wreaking unholy Hell.
Ah, the voice of experience. ;)
My mother's life was utterly ruined by people of good (???) intentions who talked her into a career as a teacher--a profession for which she was totally unsuited--, and into marriage with my stepfather, who made both our lives a foretaste of Hell; that was indeed our experience.
Now that that issue is out of the way, please tell me more about sacred music of the 19th century that is worth hearing today.
Like me you have been here for umpteen years, and in all that time I cannot think of a single post of yours (other than regarding your pathetic personal life) that offered information rather than begging for it. We have given our all with regard to this topic, as we always do. Stop asking for more, and for once in your life consider sharing an appreciation from which the rest of us might benefit.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sun May 15, 2016 6:35 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
dulcinea wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
dulcinea wrote:People with good intentions have an uncanny knack for wreaking unholy Hell.
Ah, the voice of experience. ;)
My mother's life was utterly ruined by people of good (???) intentions who talked her into a career as a teacher--a profession for which she was totally unsuited--, and into marriage with my stepfather, who made both our lives a foretaste of Hell; that was indeed our experience.
Now that that issue is out of the way, please tell me more about sacred music of the 19th century that is worth hearing today.
Like me you have been here for umpteen years, and in all that time I cannot think of a single post of yours (other than regarding your pathetic personal life) that offered information rather than begging for it. We have given our all with regard to this topic, as we always do. Stop asking for more, and for once in your life consider sharing an appreciation from which the rest of us might benefit.
What's with the testiness? Of course I appreciate everything that you offer, or don't you read my replies? I can offer information anytime you ask; what would you like to know?
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jserraglio » Mon May 16, 2016 12:40 pm

Sir John Blackwood McEwen: Hymn on the Morning of Christ's Nativity — though composed 1901-05 Victorian in spirit and style. Excellent. The Chandos premiere recording is on YT.

A stunning masterwork not yet mentioned? Missa Solemnis.

Also an AT fave — Cherubini Requiem.


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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Mon May 16, 2016 3:40 pm

How do you rate that Requiem Mass which Verdi wrote in collaboration with other composers, each participant assigned one section of the text?
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jserraglio » Mon May 16, 2016 4:50 pm

Haven't heard it yet.




Antonio Buzzolla - (1815–1871) I. Introitus Requiem e Kyrie chorus
Antonio Bazzini - (1818–1897) II. Sequentia 1. Dies Irae chorus
Carlo Pedrotti - (1817–1893) 2. Tuba mirum solo (baritone) and chorus
Antonio Cagnon - (1828–1896) 3. Quid sum miser duet: soprano, alto
Federico Ricci - (1809–1877) 4. Recordare Jesu quartet: soprano, alto, baritone, bass Alessandro Nini - (1805–1880) 5. Ingemisco solo (tenor) and chorus
Raimondo Boucheron - (1800–1876) 6. Confutatis, Oro supplex solo (bass) and chorus
Carlo Coccia - (1782–1873) 7. Lacrimosa, Amen A Capella chorus and chorus
Gaetano Gaspari - (1808–1881) III. Offertorium Domine Jesu, Quam olim Abrahae Hostias, Quam olim Abrahae quartet (soprano, alto, tenor, bass) and chorus
Pietro Platania - (1828–1907) IV. Sanctus Sanctus, Hosanna, Benedictus, Hosanna solo (soprano) and chorus
Lauro Rossi - (1810–1885) V. Agnus Dei Agnus Dei solo (alto)
Teodulo Mabellini - (1817–1897) VI. Communio Lux aeterna trio: tenor, baritone, bass
Giuseppe Verdi - (1813–1901) VII. Responsorium Libera me, Dies Irae, Requiem aeternam, Libera me solo (soprano) and chorus.
Last edited by jserraglio on Mon May 16, 2016 4:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Mon May 16, 2016 4:55 pm

jserraglio wrote:This one? Haven't heard it yet.

I heard it on PBS two decades ago, and have only a faint memory of how it sounded.
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Mon May 16, 2016 5:47 pm

My freshman year at college coincided with the mandatory retirement of the organist and choir director Carl Weinrich. He is little remembered these days, but check out the name of the arranger at the top of Malotte's Lord's Prayer. Anyway, for his finale he wanted the chapel choir to perform the Inflamatus movement from Rossini's Stabat Mater. Even the most junior and naive members of the choir could not understand this breach of good taste, and somehow he was talked out of it.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by John F » Tue May 17, 2016 1:49 am

Carl Weinrich's recordings for Westminster of Bach's organ music were well thought of in the 1950s, and I still have some of them. But none have been reissued on CD - amazon.com lists only a few of the original LPs. Whether this is the effect of his being little remembered among people younger than me (which is most people), or the cause of it, or both, I couldn't guess. Westminster also made highly regarded recordings of André Marchal and Marcel Dupré, but they haven't come back on CD either.
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Tue May 17, 2016 3:25 am

John F wrote:Carl Weinrich's recordings for Westminster of Bach's organ music were well thought of in the 1950s, and I still have some of them. But none have been reissued on CD - amazon.com lists only a few of the original LPs. Whether this is the effect of his being little remembered among people younger than me (which is most people), or the cause of it, or both, I couldn't guess. Westminster also made highly regarded recordings of André Marchal and Marcel Dupré, but they haven't come back on CD either.
I am familiar with the recordings, made on an organ in a little church in Sweden. At the time, it was a great effort to find an organ appropriate for a complete Bach. They had to stop the traffic outside the church to produce the silence needed to record the music. Weinrich was the first organist to record a complete Bach other than Schweitzer, who is greatly inferior.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by John F » Tue May 17, 2016 5:19 am

As I remember, Weinrich and Helmut Walcha embarked concurrently on complete Bach recordings, and I believe both of them made it, though I don't know who finished first. Indeed, according to the Wikipedia article on Walcha, he recorded the complete Bach a second time, for stereo. Back then, I believe the reviewers mostly favored Walcha's Bach, but for me it was somewhat restrained and also, in the DG Archiv LP packaging, more expensive compared with Weinrich, so the choice was easy.
John Francis

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Tue May 17, 2016 11:25 am

John F wrote:As I remember, Weinrich and Helmut Walcha embarked concurrently on complete Bach recordings, and I believe both of them made it, though I don't know who finished first. Indeed, according to the Wikipedia article on Walcha, he recorded the complete Bach a second time, for stereo. Back then, I believe the reviewers mostly favored Walcha's Bach, but for me it was somewhat restrained and also, in the DG Archiv LP packaging, more expensive compared with Weinrich, so the choice was easy.
Who were the outstanding composers for the organ of the 19th c? Liszt composed several good pieces, but Widor only annoyed me.
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Tue May 17, 2016 11:35 am

John F wrote:As I remember, Weinrich and Helmut Walcha embarked concurrently on complete Bach recordings, and I believe both of them made it, though I don't know who finished first. Indeed, according to the Wikipedia article on Walcha, he recorded the complete Bach a second time, for stereo. Back then, I believe the reviewers mostly favored Walcha's Bach, but for me it was somewhat restrained and also, in the DG Archiv LP packaging, more expensive comcyclpared with Weinrich, so the choice was easy.
That's not quite right. Between Weinrich/Schweitzer and Walcha there are a couple of complete Bach sets by other organists. I still own the vinyl of Walter Kraft, and Marie-Claire Alain made her first of three complete Bach cycles for the Musical Heritage Society.

Walcha, incidentally, was blind. There is something of a tradition of blind organists. Vierne was also blind. In college I had the privilege of turning pages for a young blind organist. He learned his music through Braille.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by John F » Tue May 17, 2016 12:09 pm

I believe it's you who have the sequence wrong. According to the Wikipedia article on Walcha, which more or less agrees with what I remember (I haven't researched it), Walcha completed his first, monaural Bach cycle for DG Archiv in 1952. As far as I can find out, Alain's Bach recordings for Discophiles français/Haydn Society began in the mid-'50s, Kraft's for Vox in the 1960s as part of their big and very valuable Vox Box project.

André Marchal, whom I mentioned, was also blind. Blind musicians on other instruments and blind classical singers are rare, and I've wondered why so many blind instrumentalists were organists. Any idea about that?
John Francis

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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Tue May 17, 2016 9:25 pm

John F wrote:I believe it's you who have the sequence wrong. According to the Wikipedia article on Walcha, which more or less agrees with what I remember (I haven't researched it), Walcha completed his first, monaural Bach cycle for DG Archiv in 1952. As far as I can find out, Alain's Bach recordings for Discophiles français/Haydn Society began in the mid-'50s, Kraft's for Vox in the 1960s as part of their big and very valuable Vox Box project.

André Marchal, whom I mentioned, was also blind. Blind musicians on other instruments and blind classical singers are rare, and I've wondered why so many blind instrumentalists were organists. Any idea about that?
Certainly. For brilliant blind musicians it is a rare source of fun in a world otherwise encompassed by deadly darkness.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

THEHORN
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by THEHORN » Fri May 20, 2016 5:50 pm

As far as I am concerned, there is nothing in 19th century religious works to equal the sublimity of the three Bruckner masses and his Te Deum . His numerous a cappella motets an d the 150th Psalm for orchestra and chorus are also wonderful . You need to get the recordings of these by the great Bruckner conductor Eugen Jochum on DG .

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
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Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Fri May 20, 2016 6:06 pm

THEHORN wrote:As far as I am concerned, there is nothing in 19th century religious works to equal the sublimity of the three Bruckner masses and his Te Deum . His numerous a cappella motets an d the 150th Psalm for orchestra and chorus are also wonderful . You need to get the recordings of these by the great Bruckner conductor Eugen Jochum on DG .
Bruckner, like several other great composers (Bach, Mendelssohn, arguably Mozart and Beethoven) was the greatest organist of his time. Unfortunately, he left few compositions for organ.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

dulcinea
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Location: tampa, fl

Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by dulcinea » Sun May 22, 2016 9:20 am

THEHORN wrote:As far as I am concerned, there is nothing in 19th century religious works to equal the sublimity of the three Bruckner masses and his Te Deum . His numerous a cappella motets an d the 150th Psalm for orchestra and chorus are also wonderful . You need to get the recordings of these by the great Bruckner conductor Eugen Jochum on DG .
The library of the Rio Piedras campus of the UPR has an encyclopedia that describes and comments on works of literature and music. The article on the Messen of Bruckner--which was written by someone who clearly did not understand the style and personality of AB--mentions SIX Messen. :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?:
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

jserraglio
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Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jserraglio » Sun May 22, 2016 10:18 am

meta-spiritual ........

Mahaiia Jackson - 1961 Stockholm [Mildred Falls]

http://pastdaily.com/2015/01/18/mahalia ... llimaufry/

1. I See God 4:50
2. Somebody Got Bigger Than You And I 5:39
3. Elijah Rock 5:10
4. He’s Right On Time 6:03
5. How I Got Over 7:31
6. You Will Never Walk Alone 4:53
7. It Don’t Cost Very Much 4:59
8. Tell The World 2:35
9. There’s A Balm In Gilead 3:59

Mahalia Jackson - 1961 Stockholm with Mildred Falls (piano)
Live at the Konserthuset, Stockholm, Sweden
April 20, 1961

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
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Re: Tell Me About Sacred Music Of The 19th Century

Post by jbuck919 » Sun May 22, 2016 6:31 pm

dulcinea wrote:
THEHORN wrote:As far as I am concerned, there is nothing in 19th century religious works to equal the sublimity of the three Bruckner masses and his Te Deum . His numerous a cappella motets an d the 150th Psalm for orchestra and chorus are also wonderful . You need to get the recordings of these by the great Bruckner conductor Eugen Jochum on DG .
The library of the Rio Piedras campus of the UPR has an encyclopedia that describes and comments on works of literature and music. The article on the Messen of Bruckner--which was written by someone who clearly did not understand the style and personality of AB--mentions SIX Messen. :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?:
In fact Bruckner did compose six masses. One is incomplete, consisting only of the Kyrie and the Gloria. BTW, Germans do not use "Messe" by itself to refer to the church service. "Messe" means "fair," as in the kind one attends. When referring to the mass, they invariably say either "Heilige Messe" or "Gottesdienst."

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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