Fabulous Viola & Piano Music (unknown)

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Lance
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Fabulous Viola & Piano Music (unknown)

Post by Lance » Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:33 pm

Centaur Records has produced a number of truly fascinating recordings. One such disc is Centaur 3326 which contains Carl Reinecke's 10 Little Pieces, Op. 213; Johann Wenzel Kalliwoda's Six Nocturnes, Op. 130 and Hans Sitt's Album Leaves, Op. 39. All fairly unknown music but because of American violist Brett Deubner's work in unearthing this music and performing and teaching it, we have a highly entertaining album with music from highly-gifted composers. The album is stunningly performed with French pianist Caroline Fauchet. Together, the Deubner-Fauchet Duo is doing some fine things.
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When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
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jbuck919
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Re: Fabulous Viola & Piano Music (unknown)

Post by jbuck919 » Tue Aug 08, 2017 9:04 pm

Lance wrote:
Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:33 pm
Centaur Records has produced a number of truly fascinating recordings. One such disc is Centaur 3326 which contains Carl Reinecke's 10 Little Pieces, Op. 213; Johann Wenzel Kalliwoda's Six Nocturnes, Op. 130 and Hans Sitt's Album Leaves, Op. 39. All fairly unknown music but because of American violist Brett Deubner's work in unearthing this music and performing and teaching it, we have a highly entertaining album with music from highly-gifted composers. The album is stunningly performed with French pianist Caroline Fauchet. Together, the Deubner-Fauchet Duo is doing some fine things.
Something by Reinecke called Ten Little Pieces for viola and piano? I'll take your word for its value, though not without doubts aforethought Still, this led me by a circuitous route to the following nifty piece by Reinecke, who probably would have dropped dead if he heard it played by three women, let alone of (to me, anyway), obscure central European origin. It is clearly indebted to Brahms, and lacks only, oh, say, two movements to be a work of the first order.


There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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