Ania Dorfmann, pianist - Remastered, 9 CDs

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Lance
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Ania Dorfmann, pianist - Remastered, 9 CDs

Post by Lance » Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:36 pm

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Ania Dorfmann, a noted teacher at Juilliard School when alive, and a pianist whose career got jump-started after a performance of a Beethoven piano concerto, Toscanini conducting, is another cult figure among piano aficionados. Now comes this newly remastered set of her mono and very few stereo recordings on nine (9) CDs showing original covers. I have the LPs, but am looking forward to this new set and couldn't be happier Sony is resurrecting all these great artists of the past. Beyond us "oldies," few people even recognize her name today. I trust once these sets are snapped up, we won't see them around after the initial sale.
Lance G. Hill
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When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

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John F
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Re: Ania Dorfmann, pianist - Remastered, 9 CDs

Post by John F » Sat Aug 19, 2017 1:18 am

The only Dorfman I've heard was in NBC Symphony broadcasts conducted by Toscanini, in which the conductor was obviously dominant. The only other pianist he often had as a concerto soloist was his son-in-law, Vladimir Horowitz, who was not going to be reduced to anonymity by Toscanini or any other conductor. Not so Ania Dorfman, not that I've heard.
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Re: Ania Dorfmann, pianist - Remastered, 9 CDs

Post by Lance » Sun Aug 20, 2017 12:04 am

There was also the Rudolf Serkin performance with Toscanini of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major, issued on RCA.
John F wrote:
Sat Aug 19, 2017 1:18 am
The only Dorfman I've heard was in NBC Symphony broadcasts conducted by Toscanini, in which the conductor was obviously dominant. The only other pianist he often had as a concerto soloist was his son-in-law, Vladimir Horowitz, who was not going to be reduced to anonymity by Toscanini or any other conductor. Not so Ania Dorfman, not that I've heard.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

John F
Posts: 18565
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Ania Dorfmann, pianist - Remastered, 9 CDs

Post by John F » Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:06 am

Toscanini's concerto performances with pianists other than Horowitz and Dorfman were few and far between. Rudolf Serkin played for him only twice, with the New York Philharmonic and the NBC Symphony - and I have the feeling that this was at least partly because of his admiration for and friendship with Adolf Busch, Serkin's father-in-law. Similarly, I suspect that Toscanini called on Horowitz repeatedly in concertos, not just Tchaikovsky but Brahms, partly because he was his son-in-law.

Indeed, Toscanini's concerts include very few concertos, and sometimes these featured first-desk players in his orchestras. He conducted choral works repeatedly, but few pieces for solo voice and orchestra. And as an opera conductor, he chose singers who would do as he wished with their roles, or else he sent them packing. It's astonishing that in 1936, having cast Friedrich Schorr in his Salzburg Festival "Die Meistersinger," he forced him to withdraw. According to Erich Leinsdorf, who played the piano in the rehearsals, "As soon as we began to rehearse with Schorr it became obvious that Toscanini disliked everything the singer did. Schorr, set in his ways, did not give an inch, or could not fall in with the conductor's suggestions." It didn't occur to Toscanini that Schorr, the greatest Hans Sachs of the day, might understand his role better than the Maestro, who might have learned a thing or two from the singer. The replacement, Hans Hermann Nissen, evidently did as he was told.
John Francis

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