The Legend Of Faust

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dulcinea
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The Legend Of Faust

Post by dulcinea » Tue Sep 05, 2017 5:15 pm

Since the sixteenth century, how many settings of the Faust legend are there?
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diegobueno
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by diegobueno » Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:10 pm

You can find a pretty extensive list of Faust pieces here, all from the 19th and 20th centuries:

https://www.faust.com/music/

In the 19th century, every composer and his uncle wrote their own version of Faust. I don't know of any Faust pieces pre-1800, so maybe should be the focus of the discussion.

John F
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by John F » Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:34 pm

There are also works which aren't "settings of the Faust legend" but related, like Alkan's piano piece "Quasi-Faust." And still others with an allegorical relationship such as Stravinsky's "L'histoire du soldat," though its story is supposedly taken from a Russian folk tale. The answer is, "Many."

My favorites aren't based on Goethe's great drama but on earlier versions of the story: Busoni's "Doktor Faust," Schnittke's "Seid nüchtern und wachet," and yes, "L'histoire du soldat." There's a marvelous English version by Michael Flanders and Kitty Black that was recorded by EMI with forces that performed it at the Edinburgh Festival in 1954. And thanks yet again to YouTube, here it is:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYsrXGF7pw8


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoCsXdb8ISs

The actors are Anthony Nicholls (Narrator), Terence Longdon (Soldier), and Robert Helpmann (Devil), with members of the Royal Philharmonic conducted by John Pritchard.
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jserraglio
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by jserraglio » Wed Sep 06, 2017 9:51 am

Contemporary Pop Music & the Faust legend:

Blues guitarist Robert Johnson fancifully said to have acquired his playing skill from the devil at a deserted crossroads. Songs such as "Cross Road Blues" and "Me and the Devil Blues" allude to his pact with the devil.

Blues guitarist Tommy Johnson also claimed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for guitar mastery, though Tommy Johnson's claim precedes that of Robert Johnson's.

Randy Newman's "Faust"

Kamelot's Epica Saga (Epica and The Black Halo)

The Trans-Siberian Orchestra's Beethoven's Last Night

Switchfoot's "Faust, Midas and Myself" (2006)

Cradle of Filth's "Absinthe with Faust" song (from the album Nymphetamine)

Little Tragedies' New Faust (2003).

Akercocke's "Marguerite & Gretchen" (from the album Rape of the Bastard Nazarene, 1999); the band's name is taken from the talking Capuchin monkey in Robert Nye's Faust.

Enigma "Dancing With Mephisto" (from the album A Posteriori)

Radiohead's "Faust Arp" and "Videotape" (from the album In Rainbows)

Tenacious D's "The Pick of Destiny"

Muse's "The Small Print" (from the album Absolution, originally titled "Action Faust")

Current 93's album Faust, based on a story by Count Eric Stenbock.

Frank Zappa's "Titties & Beer" (from the album Zappa in New York)

Tom Waits's "Lucinda" (from the album Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers & Bastards)

The Band's "Daniel and the Sacred Harp" (from the album Stage Fright)

Sabbat's "A Cautionary Tale" (from the album History of a Time to Come)

The Charlie Daniels Band's "The Devil Went Down to Georgia".

Streetlight Manifesto's "Down, Down, Down to Mephisto's Cafe" (from the album Somewhere in the Between)

Dark Moor's "Faustus" (from the album Autumnal)

The Police's "Wrapped Around Your Finger" single (from the album Synchroncity) refers to Mephistopheles by way of analogy

Gorillaz' "Faust" (from the album G-Sides)

Konrad Boehmer Apocalipsis cum figuris (electronic, instrumental, vocal, 1984)

Konrad Boehmer Doktor Fausti Höllenfahrt (orchestra, 2006)

Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody"

Moonspell's "Mephisto" (from the album Irreligious)

Septic Flesh's "Faust" from the album Sumerian Daemons

Faust, a German Krautrock band

The Fall's "Dktr Faustus" (from the album Bend Sinister)

Poet JB Goodenough's "Children of Michael" which tells the story of a man named Michael who makes a deal with the year (the devil or fate), to have many children but the year has to "choose one for himself". The story features a chorus throughout, and was recorded by Irish folk singer Tommy Makem on his album Ancient Pulsing.

Agalloch's "Faustian Echoes"

The Human Abstract's "Faust" (2011)

SicKtanicK's "Faust" (from the album "Chapter 3: Awake (The Ministry of Hate))

Marilyn Manson's "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles" (from the album The Pale Emperor)

Blue Öyster Cult's "Burnin' for you"

Faust is the stage name of black metal musician Bård Eithun.

Ihsahn's "Alchemist" (from the album angL, 2008) quotes two passages from Goethe's Faust.
The songs "Malediction" and "Elevator" likewise allude to Faustian themes.

Secret Sphere's "Dr. Faustus" (from the album A Time Never Come, 2001)

Dimmu Borgir's "The Maelstrom Mephisto" (from the album Puritanical Euphoric Misanthropia, 2001)

Iron Mask's "Doctor Faust" (from the album Diabolica, 2016)

Immortal Technique's "Dance With The Devil" (from the album Revolutionary Vol. 1, 2006)
Last edited by jserraglio on Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

John F
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by John F » Wed Sep 06, 2017 11:56 am

The president of Harvard University is named Drew Faust. No musical connection there that I'm aware of...
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jbuck919
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by jbuck919 » Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:33 pm

Faust means "fist" in German, and there is a movie by Reiner Werner Fassbinder called Faustrecht der Freiheit which mimics a suicide that eventually Fassbiner committed himself. I researched this title for a long time and still cannot come up with an adequate translation. It is usually called in English Fox and His Friends.

As for the legendary character, everything stands on the great poem of Goethe. No composition, not Gounod, not Mahler, does justice to it.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

John F
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by John F » Mon Sep 18, 2017 4:51 pm

I'd say Berlioz and Boito come closer.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwupWUI-9Ps
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dulcinea
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by dulcinea » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:45 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:33 pm
Faust means "fist" in German, and there is a movie by Reiner Werner Fassbinder called Faustrecht der Freiheit which mimics a suicide that eventually Fassbiner committed himself. I researched this title for a long time and still cannot come up with an adequate translation. It is usually called in English Fox and His Friends.

As for the legendary character, everything stands on the great poem of Goethe. No composition, not Gounod, not Mahler, does justice to it.
So, no Faust music before Goethe? Hasn't Marlowe inspired any? :?
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

jbuck919
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by jbuck919 » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:55 pm

dulcinea wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:45 pm
jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:33 pm
Faust means "fist" in German, and there is a movie by Reiner Werner Fassbinder called Faustrecht der Freiheit which mimics a suicide that eventually Fassbiner committed himself. I researched this title for a long time and still cannot come up with an adequate translation. It is usually called in English Fox and His Friends.

As for the legendary character, everything stands on the great poem of Goethe. No composition, not Gounod, not Mahler, does justice to it.
So, no Faust music before Goethe? Hasn't Marlowe inspired any? :?
I don't think there was any Faust music before Goethe but you have given us an excellent reminder. Happy birthday, BTW. This was the first opera I ever saw.



There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

jserraglio
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by jserraglio » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:09 pm

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faust_(Spohr)

Composed after Goethe but libretto not based on Goethe.

jbuck919
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by jbuck919 » Tue Sep 19, 2017 11:18 pm

I think we've all forgotten Gretchen am Spinnrade. Gretchen is short for Margarite in German and the words are by Goethe. It is easily the most famous Lied ever written (unless it is Erlkönig, also to a text by Goethe), but it is based on Faust abandoning Margarite. Incidentally, Schubert, who was but 16 when he composed this, changed the words slightly at the end.


There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

jserraglio
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by jserraglio » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:11 am

Beethoven Op. 75 no 3 Aus Goethes Faust: “Es war einmal ein König” (1809)



Spohr, Faust (composed 1813). Not based on Goethe; "libretto draws mainly on Faust plays and poems by Maximilian Klinger and Heinrich von Kleist" (Wikipedia).



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQT4qn9 ... qw6C3HTFwd

jbuck919
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by jbuck919 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:53 am

That is hardly one of the great works of Beethoven, who invented the song cycle with his masterpiece An die ferne Geliebte. However, there is a famous story about him and Goethe meeting. (Goethe lived an unusually long life for the time and he also overlapped with Schubert and Mendelssohn.) Apparently they were walking together in a park when they encountered a nobleman. Goethe made a bow, but Beethoven did not. To paraphrase from memory: "Who is he, when we shall be remembered for centuries?"

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

jserraglio
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by jserraglio » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:02 am

That is hardly one of the great works of Beethoven
Didn't know this great little gem before I went Faust y-hunting. His magnum opus, No, a delightful song, .

dulcinea
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Re: The Legend Of Faust

Post by dulcinea » Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:40 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:55 pm
dulcinea wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:45 pm
jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:33 pm
Faust means "fist" in German, and there is a movie by Reiner Werner Fassbinder called Faustrecht der Freiheit which mimics a suicide that eventually Fassbiner committed himself. I researched this title for a long time and still cannot come up with an adequate translation. It is usually called in English Fox and His Friends.

As for the legendary character, everything stands on the great poem of Goethe. No composition, not Gounod, not Mahler, does justice to it.
So, no Faust music before Goethe? Hasn't Marlowe inspired any? :?
I don't think there was any Faust music before Goethe but you have given us an excellent reminder. Happy birthday, BTW. This was the first opera I ever saw.


Thank you for the well wishes. How do you rate the symphony of Liszt?
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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