What I listened to today

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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:45 am

Bernstein, New York Phil ‎– Beethoven: Fifth Symphony Columbia LP ‎MS 6468

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Last edited by jserraglio on Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:46 am

Bernstein New York Phil Beethoven Symphony No. 7 Columbia MS 7414


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CharmNewton
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by CharmNewton » Sat Jul 14, 2018 6:57 pm

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I remember buying this as a new release and still have my copy. It was the first recording I'd ever heard that had all the repeats. Like Monteux's Vienna Eroica, which used Beethoven's orchestration for the climax near the end of the first movement, it had the jolt of something new and different.

My own listening included the Violin Sonata in D minor, Op. 9 of Karol Szymanowski from the EMI Oistrakh Centennial tribute box of his complete recordings for that label. A very beautiful work. Oistrakh's tone was well captured by EMI in 1954. Another favorite of mine from this perios is his recording of the Bruch Violin Concerto in G minor, Op. 26.

John

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Jul 14, 2018 8:09 pm

CharmNewton wrote:
Sat Jul 14, 2018 6:57 pm
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I remember buying this as a new release and still have my copy. It was the first recording I'd ever heard that had all the repeats. Like Monteux's Vienna Eroica, which used Beethoven's orchestration for the climax near the end of the first movement, it had the jolt of something new and different.
Thanks, I did not know that. I will have to listen again.

RebLem
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Sun Jul 15, 2018 1:28 am


On Saturday, 14 JUL 2018, I listened to 3 CDs.
 
1) Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713): Sonate da Chiesa a tre, Op. 5, 10-12. (1689) |Tr. 1-4. # 10 in A Minor (4'41) |Tr. 5-8. # 11 in G Minor (5'50) |Tr. 9-13. #12 in A Major (8'19) ||Sonate da Chiesa a tre, Op. 4 (1694) #s 1-6. |Tr. 14-17. #1 in C Major (6'23) |Tr. 18-21. # 2 in G Minor (7'26) |Tr. 22-25. # 3 in A Major (9'22) |Tr. 26-29. # 4 in D Major (7'04) |Tr. 30-33. # 5 in A Minor (6'14) |Tr. 34-38. #6 in E Major (6'21)--Remy Bauet, Sayuri Yamagata, violins, Albert Bruggen, cello, Mike Fentross, Therobo (Op. 4), David van Ooijen, archlute (Op. 3), Pieter-Jan Belder, organ & harpsichord. CD 5 in a 10 CD Brillaint Classics set of the complete works of Arcangelo Corelli. Dates and venues not given.
 
These are wonderfully soulful works lovingly performed, as have been all the other CDs so far in this set.
 
2) Ture Rangstrom (1884-1947): |Tr. 1. Symphony 3 in D Flat Major "Songs Under the Stars" (22'00) |Tr. 2-6. Symphony 4 "Invocatio"--Symphonic Improvisations for orchestra and organ (32'35)--Michail Jurowski, cond., Norrkoping Symphony Orch., Mark Fahlsjo, organ. CD 3 of a 3 CD cpo set of the complete symphonies + a few other orchestral works by Rangstrom. Rec 8/1995 Konzerthaus "Louis de Geer" Norrkoping.
 
Rangstrom's few fans have struggled over the years to get him the recognition he deserves. He is not considered politically correct because his music is very nationalistic and filled with bombast, so much so that early on he acquired the derisive nickname "Sturm und Drangstrom." But I find much to admire here, and so do the reviewers at Amazon, who all give this set at least 4 stars, and most of them 5. I concur with the 5 rating.
 
3) Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924): Works for solo organ. (70'00)--Liuwe Tamminga, organist, playing in organs in and around the Tuscan city of Lucca, where various members of the Puccini family had been organists for a couple of hundred years, one generation after another. This album has 19 tracks. The only one that is longer than 4'48 is Tr. 19, the Grande Fantasia di Emile Tavan from Tosca, transcribed for solo organ. A passacaille CD rec. March, 2017.
 
One of the people who earned a living as a musician in the Chicago area for many years was a man named Darwin C Shoger (4 MAR 1909-17 JAN 1994). He is buried in Naperville Cemetery in DuPage County. He played a steam calliope powered by motors that were about as loud as the music it produced. I met him at a childrens' art exhibition sometime in the 70's on the Wooded Island in Jachson Park in Chicago. The bridge that leads onto the island is the bridge from which Clarence Darrow's ashes were spread. To Hyde Parkers, that, if nothing else, makes the island hallowed ground. Shoger usually played at events like outdoor mall openings, and those auto sales events where the dealers send up searchlights at night to attract customers. It seems to have been a hard scrabble life, but if he lived in Naperville, he must have been very successful at it, as it is definitely what you would call an upscale community, then and now.
 
At any rate, much of the music on this album reminds me of that steam calliope music. No motors sounding of course, but the music on this album has a decidedly festive air about it, more like the sort of music you would get from a carousel at a carnival than music you would associate with a sacred service. Its really great fun, but not very profound. This, however, is not, by a long shot, Puccini's complete organ music. Finding Puccini's organ works, most of which come from very early in his career, is still very much a work in progress. Sone of the music on this album was discovered as late as 2016 and more remains to be done. Most of them were never published, and the manuscripts are scattered all over Italy and other countries as well, mostly in the hands of private collectors.
 
The organist, Liuwe Tamminga is, believe it or not, a native of Friesland, a region of The Netherlands. Not exactly intuitive, but there you have it.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

RebLem
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Mon Jul 16, 2018 3:15 am


On Sunday, 15 JUL 2018, I listened to 3 CDs.
 
1) Frank Bridge (1879-1941): |Tr. 1. Dance Rhapsody for orchestra, H84 (1908) (19'16) |Tr. 2-6. Five Entr'actes, H. 95 (1910), for the play "Two Hunchbacks," by Emile Cammaerts (1878-1953) (12'05) |Tr. 7. Dance Poem for orchestra, H. 111 (1913) (13'48) |Tr. 8. Norse Legend for small orchestra, H. 60 (1905/1938) (4'48) |Tr. 9-12. The Sea, Suite for Orchestra, H. 100 (1910-11) (22'08)--Richard Hickox, cond., BBC Symphony Orchestra of Wales. CD 2 of a 6 CD CHANDOS set of Frank Bridge's complete orchestra works by these forces. Rec. 19-20 SEP 2001 Brangwyn Hall, Swansea.
 
The recording of the Dance Rhapsody is a world premiere recording, the only such on this CD. It was first performed in 2008 at the Royal College of Music, to "considerable critical acclaim," the composer conducting. But it didn't stick. It received only 3 other performances during the composers lifetime, and it seems to have had only once performance after his death before the one in hand. It deserves better. Bridge was always in love with the full on romanticism of Russian composers, and one can hear their influence here in this very appealing work.
 
The Five Entr'actes is, of course, incidental music. The author of the play was a Belgian writer. It was first performed as the second part of a double bill in London, organized by Marie Brema, a prominent mezzo-soprano of the day, who had been, among other things, the first Angel in the premiere performance of Elgar's Dream of Gerontius in 1900. She was also the Belgian writer's mother-in-law. It helps to have connections! It is a fairytale set in the Belgian Ardennes, with lots of Belgian folk music providing the basis for the score, which is for a standard theater orchestra of that time.
 
Dance Poem is a short ballet, and in it we find the beginnings of a change of style, to a more conservative, restrained, and disciplined method and style of composition. He is becoming more concerned with formal structure, while still retaining a very romantic approach.
 
Norse Legend was originally composed in 1905 as a piece for violin and pian, but Bridge decided to orchestrate it in 1938.
 
And finally, The Sea is the most important work on this CD. For one thing, this is the first work Bridge took with him on his fir US tour in 1923, which was to Boston, Cleveland and Detroit. He found the Cleveland audience particularly attentive and appreciative. And it is the only purely orchestra work he wrote for which he also wrote a descriptive program:
"Seascape paints the sea on a summer morning. From high drifts is seen a great expanse of waters lying in the sunlight. Warm breezes play over the surface. Sea-foam froths among the low-lying rocks and pools on the shore, playfully not stormy. Moonlight paints a calm sea at night. The first moonbeams are struggling to pierce through dark clouds, which eventually pass over, leaving the sea shimmering in full moonlight. Finally, a raging Storm. Wind, rain, and tempestuous seas, with the lulling of the storm and alllusion to the first number is heard and which may be regarded as the sea-lover's dedication to the sea."
 
2-3) G. F. Handel (1685-1759): Messiah (1742) (2'20'40)--Timothy Dean, cond., The Choir & Orchestra of Pro Christe, Jennifer Smith & Helen Kucharek, sopranos, Linda Finnie, mezzo-soprano, Neil Mackie, tenor, Rodney Macann, bass-baritone. 2 GUILD CDs, rec. St Augustine's Church, Kilburn, London, 1986.
 
Some months ago, I ordered a slough of CDs from Presto Classical in the UK, in response to Lance's telling us of a massive sale on a number of labels there, chief among them GUILD records. I went to the Presto site in response to that post, and found the GUILD records did have the deepest discounts, so I ordred only GUILD records I was interested in., The captioned issue was one of them. I knew nothing about it. I bought it blind, without ever having read a review of it, just bought it on spec, because I am always interested in getting recordings of this work, one of my all time favorites.
 
I am pleased to tell you I lucked out. Although this does not reolace the 1966 Mackerras recording with the English Chamber Orchestra, Elizabeth Harwood, the incomparable Janet Baker, Paul Esswood, Robert Tear, Raimund Herincz & The Ambrosian Singers in my affections, this version conducted by Timothy Dean is now my second favorite recording of this work; I will be listening to it again. This is not one to just retire to my shelves and forget. For me, the touchstone for this work is the low female voice aria, "He was desised." And I have to say only Janet Baker does it better than Linda Finnie, and that by a small margin. And of course, another magnificent part of this work is the Hallelujah Chorus which ends Part II; then he begins Part III with "I know that my Redeemer liveth," a calm, quiet, serene expression of religious faith. Its as if Handel is saying, "Perhaps you thought the Hallelujan Chorus was a tad overwrought. If so, I think this one will really get ya!" This version is marred slightly by the lack of an Amen Chorus at the end. It ends with the chorus "Worthy is the lamb," which is, however, developed into a very fine, rousing chorus in the last bars.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:28 am

That's very odd about the "Amen" missing from the Messiah recording. I've sung Messiah in both Carnegie Hall and Philharmonic (now Geffen) Hall roughly 100 times, and the "Amen" is right there in the score as an integral part of the piece, not an addendum by any means. The commercial recordings I have all include it. Does the booklet that comes with your CDs give any rational for its exclusion? Inquiring minds want to know! :D

BTW: I don't often respond to your reviews. That doesn't mean that you're not being read.

RebLem
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:54 pm

No, no explanation or rationale is given for the exclusion of the Amen Chorus. I own the following Messiah's beside the Dean and Mackerras: Cleobury, C. Davis, Jacobs, Marriner, McGegan, Pinnock, Sargent, and Solti. The Dean is the only one without an Amen Chorus.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:01 am

Giulini/Philharmonia ‎– Dvorak Symphony N°4 / Scherzo Capriccioso Angel LP S-35847

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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Wed Aug 08, 2018 1:14 pm

Bartok - Violin Concerto No. 2
Stravinsky - Violin Concerto

Joseph Silverstein, violin
Erich Leinsdorf/BSO
RCA LM-2852

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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Wed Aug 08, 2018 1:45 pm

Walter Carlos (Wendy Carlos)
Switched-On Bach
1968 Columbia MS 7194


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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Fri Aug 10, 2018 6:09 am

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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Aug 11, 2018 1:40 am


jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:42 am


John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Sun Aug 12, 2018 9:40 am

The Beecham set is special because as far as I know, it's all we have of his "Figaro," and indeed of the Da Ponte operas - his complete recordings were of eserraglio and "Flute." For no good reason, EMI bypassed Beecham in that repertoire, and he appears not to have conducted it in the opera house, at least not with microphones.
John Francis

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Sun Aug 12, 2018 10:13 am

jserraglio wrote:
Wed Aug 08, 2018 1:45 pm
Walter Carlos (Wendy Carlos)
Switched-On Bach
1968 Columbia MS 7194


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What a delightful record! I remember it was so popular when it came out in the 1960's, I grabbed a copy right away and enjoyed it to the hilt. The first of many such efforts by Wendy Carlos, and her best-selling record, bet never have I seen a copy on CD. Am I missing something?

Tomita also explored classical music, and he had a flair for Debussy, said disc was issued IIRC during the 1980's and sold well. If you don't have it, try to find a copy: Golliwog's Cakewalk is truly a very funny masterpiece.

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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sun Aug 12, 2018 10:36 am

CBS CD MK 7194 (1985)

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Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Aug 13, 2018 2:56 am

Karol Szymanowski: 9 Preludes, Op. 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AqXrydTmHg

I'm taking an interest in all things Polish thanks to my friendship with my physician!!

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Aug 13, 2018 8:04 am

Szymanowski's magnum opus is the opera "King Roger," a variant of "The Bacchae," which has some gorgeous music. It's seldom performed, at least outside Poland, but there's a fine recording conducted by Simon Rattle with Thomas Hampson in the lead role, plus Szymanowski's Sinfonia Concertante for piano and orchestra with Leif Ove Andsnes. Here's a bit of the opera:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2PUfx24XW8
John Francis

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Mon Aug 13, 2018 12:15 pm

Sir Simon also has a recording of Szymanowski's two quite beautiful Violin Concerti w/Thomas Zehetmair (one of my favorite violinists in XXth Century repertoire). If you don't know these works, please order this OOP five star disc: it's available used for merely two bucks!

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Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Aug 13, 2018 2:08 pm

Thank you, both of you, for those excellent tips. Will listen in a few hours. I did know about the Violin Concerto, having heard it some years ago. I'm seeing my friend on Thursday and can speak with him about this, as we do discuss all things European - Polish in particular.

Two nights ago he emailed me a power point presentation about this astonishing cultural feature in Krakow:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eaa8xL6scwE

Belle
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Belle » Mon Aug 13, 2018 5:33 pm

Listening to this at the moment:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0zlpb6coBY

These really are excellent pieces and so reminiscent of Debussy at times. The pianist seems right at home with this repertoire.

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