What I listened to today

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RebLem
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:34 pm


On Sunday, 3 JUN 2018, I listened to 3 CDs.
 
1) Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713): CD 3 of a 10 CD Brilliant Classics set of the complete works. Sonate da Chiesa a tre, Op. 2 (1685) +, #s 9-12: |Tr. 1-3. #9 in F Sharp Minor (6'28) |Tr. 4-7. # 10 in E Major (5'45) |Tr. 8-10. # 11 in E Flat Major (3'27) |Tr. 11. # 12 ub G Major (5'04) ||Tr. 12-16. Sonata a quattro in D Major, WoO 4, for tromba sola, due violine e basso (5'29) |Tr. 17-20. Sonata a tre in A Major, WoO 5 (5'00) |Tr. 21-23. Sonatra a tre in D Major, WoO 6 (3'06) |Tr. 24-27. Sonata a tre in D Major, WoO 37 (5'01) |Tr. 28-31. Sonata a tre in D, WoO 8, (6'21)--Remy Baudet, violin, Sayuri Yamagata, violin, Albert Bruggen, cello, William Wroth, baroque trumpet, Frank Wakelkamp, cello 1982 Bolink reproduction after Amati (WoO 6-7), David van Ooijen, archlute, Pieter-Jan Belder, harpsichord. No information on recording dates or venues or even publication year provided.
 
Excellent performances from an OIP ensemble. Recommended.
 
2) Ture Rangstrom (1884-1947): |Tr. 1. Dithyramb (1909, rev. by Kurt Atterberg, 1948) (17'13) |Tr. 2-5. Symphony 1 in C Sharp Minor (1914) (34'52) |Tr. 6. Varhymn (Spring Hymn) (1942) "In Memory of August Strindberg" (8'02)--Michail Jurowski, cond., Norrkoping Symphony Orch.--cpo CD, rec. AUG 1995 Konzerthaus, Norrkoping, Sweden. CD 1 of a 3 CD set of all four of Rangstrom's symphonies + other orchestra works.
 
All of the music here is composed in memory of or to honor or was inspired by the Swedish writer August Strindberg (1849-1912), for whom Ture Rangstrom felt an extraordinary artistic and stylistic affinity. He studied with a high school music teacher in his native Stockholm, composition for a couple years with Hans Pfitzner in Berlin, and also with the Wagnerian vocal pedagogue Julius Hey. Nevertheless, he was mostly a self-taught composer.
 
When he first came to wide public attention in Sweden as a result of the first performances of Dithyramb, his first orchestral composition, he was viewed in Sweden as an enfant terrible. But in comparison with what Stravinsky and Shoenberg were doing at the same time, his work on this CD must be seen as being written in a very conservative idiom.
 
3) CD 23 of a 24 CD SONY set titled "Gary Graffman, the Complete RCA & Columbia Album collection." |Tr. 1-3. Benjamin Lees (1924-2010): Piano Sonata 4 (25'00) |Tr. 4-7. Bela Bartok (1881-1945): Suite for Piano, Op. 14 (1916, rev. 1918) (8'29) |Tr. 8-11. Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953): Piano Sonata 2 in B Minor, Op. 14 (1914) (16'32). TT" 50'10. Rec. Columbia 30th St. Studio, NYC 24 JUN 1964 & 3 APR 1967 (1-3), 26 FEB 1965 (4-7), 26 DEC 1962 (8-11).
 

It is interesting that these three composers should inhabit this disc. The Wikipedia article on Lees says this: "Lees rejected atonalism and Americana in favor of classical structures. Niall O'Loughlin writes in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, "From an early interest in the bittersweet melodic style of Prokofiev and the bizarre and surrealist aspects of Bartók's music, he progressed naturally under the unconventional guidance of [George] Antheil [his most important and influential teacher and mentor]." Lees' music is rhythmically active, with frequently changing accents and meter even in his early works, and is known for its semitonal inflections in melody and harmony."

 
The Bartok Suite is one of the few solo piano works by Bartok with no folk melodies in it, though it does seem influenced by the spirit of Romanian, Arabic, and North African rhythms. It was originally in five movement work, but in 1918, he decided to drop the second movement andante.
 
To me, the Prokofiev is the most appealing work here. It has never impressed me before, but Graffman is a very persuasive advocate. Prokofiev wrote it while still a conservatory student, and he dedicated it to Maximilian Schmidthof, a fellow student who had committed suicide the year before, in 1913. But, it is a rather cheerful work, not at all the dour work you might expect in light of the dedication.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Jun 04, 2018 3:11 am

For me the Graffman disc is a complete surprise - I'd no idea he played that music. Praise to Columbia for recording and publishing it.
John Francis

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Mon Jun 04, 2018 3:27 am

Smetana_Brandenburgers in Bohemia_Tichy-Prague National Theatre 1963 Supraphon LP vinyl

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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Wed Jun 06, 2018 4:20 am

Rachmaninoff The Bells/Isle of the Dead Ormandy/Phila Columbia LP vinyl

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maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Wed Jun 06, 2018 10:14 am

jserraglio: I don't remember that LP ever being released on CD. As a long time follower of Ormandy's Rachmanninoff, that disc would really appeal to me. The only recording I have of Isle of the Dead from that era is Reiner's.

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Wed Jun 06, 2018 11:21 am

maestrob wrote:
Wed Jun 06, 2018 10:14 am
jserraglio: I don't remember that LP ever being released on CD. As a long time follower of Ormandy's Rachmanninoff, that disc would really appeal to me. The only recording I have of Isle of the Dead from that era is Reiner's.
i don't believe it has been but it's one of my favorite monos from Ormandy. And Isle is available on Amazon Prime Music and YouTube in lossy format.



I've been focusing more on LPs of late and they sure sound sweet to me. No way will I ever give them up even if I have the corresponding CD.

Description of the LP on Popsike.com: This beautiful LP from Columbia Masterworks (ML 5043, US pressing, gray 6eye label, mono only – no stereo edition exists) features Eugene Ormandy’s magnificent renditions of Sergei Rachmaninoff’s The Bells Op. 35 and Isle of the Dead Op. 29. In the former, Ormandy is joined by vocal soloists Frances Yeend (soprano), David Lloyd (tenor), and Mack Harrell (baritone), as well as by the Temple Univsrity Chorus (Chorus Director: Elaine Brown).

Both works were warmly recorded at the Academy of Music, Philadelphia – the former on 28 February 1954 and the latter on 7 November 1954. The Bells is here given in its English translation, but sounds entirely convincing given the thrust and immediacy of the singing.

Ormandy knew and worked with Rachmaninov personally and was always an insightful interpreter of the composer’s works, and it so it proves here. Both performances are imbued with a tremendous sense of occasion and can withstand the most exalted comparisons.

Incidentally, the striking cover art is credited to Kasper. There are superlative liner notes on the reverse side of the jacket by Charles Burr, printed in English only.

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Wed Jun 06, 2018 11:02 pm


On Wednesday, 6 JUN 2018, I listened to one CD.
 
1) Harold Schiffman (b. 1928): |Tr. 1-4. Symphony 2 "Music for Gyor" (2008) (21'17) |Tr. 5. Ninnerella Variata (Varied Lullaby) (1956) (7'30) |Tr. 6. Variations on "Branchwater" for guitar and orchestra (1987) (13'56) |Tr. 7-13. "Blood Mountain" Suite (2008) (21'34) |Tr. 14. Overture to a Comedy (1983) (6'14)--Katalin Koltai, guitar soloist (Tr. 6), Matyas Antal, cond., Gyor Philharmonic Orch. A North/South Consonance CD, rec. in Gyor, Hungary 11-18 OCT 2008.
 
Here is a brief bio of the composer from his website:

"Mr. Schiffman [was born in Greensboro, NC in 1928 and] received his education at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The University of California at Berkeley, and The Florida State University, Tallahassee. His principal composition teacher was Roger Sessions with whom he studied at the University of California, as well as privately in Berkeley and again later in Princeton, New Jersey, following three years service (1951-54) in the U. S. Army. In Tallahassee, a further influential mentor was Ernst von Dohnányi. Appointed to the faculty of the Florida State University School of Music in 1959, Harold Schiffman retired from the position of Professor of Composition in 1983 and was designated Professor Emeritus in 1985. He was founding director of the Florida State University Festival of New Music in 1981."

 
Schiffman writes: "Nearly 47 years after composing my first symphony (1961), I finished my second, in Tallahassee, FL. on 2 FEB 2008. The work is a paean commemorating my ten year love affair with the city of Gyor, Hungary, and its glorious philharmonic orchestra....It is scored for large orchestra...the piece treats various groupings of instruments antiphonally, somewhat in the manner of a concerto. This has particular emphasis in the 2nd movement, a set of double variations, but it is also characteristic of the entire composition.
"Ninnerella Variata was written in Princeton, NJ in Dec 1956 while I was confined to be with mumps! It was completed the day before Christmas and is dedicated to my son Roger, who was 19 months old at the time. It is scored for a small orchestra consisting of single woodwinds, two horns, celesta, and strings. The presence of a percussion instrument (celesta) may have caused the pice to be disqualified for a competition into which it was entered, the Benjamin Award for 'restful music.' A simple theme is followed by 12 variations. It proceeds in straightforward fashion at first, but as it goes on, the themes become fragmented and are developed individually. A quiet coda completes the work.
"The Variations was commissioned by guitarist Stephen Robinson. The theme, "Branchwater" is not a folk song but a tune I composed for this piece. I chose the name because, as all good Southerners know, the best way to enjoy the delights of Bourbon whiskey is with a little plain water called, in the American South, 'branchwater,' as if it came from a creek.
"The orchestral suite The Blood Mountain Suite is derived from my song cycle Blood Mountain. The cycle from 2007 is my third work based on texts by North Carolina Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byer. The others are Alma (2002), and Wake (2003), The suite is actually a transcription for large orchestra of the songs themselves.
"The Overture to a Comedy was written in 1983 for a projected opera which never came to fruition. It was to have ben titles Jurgen: A Comedy of Justice based on a novel by James Branch Cabell."
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:07 am

another mono from Ormandy -- Haydn: Symphony No. 99 in E Flat Major; Symphony No. 100 in G Major ("Military") LP vinyl

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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:29 am

maestrob wrote:
Wed Jun 06, 2018 10:14 am
jserraglio: As a long time follower of Ormandy's Rachmanninoff, that disc would really appeal to me. The only recording I have of Isle of the Dead from that era is Reiner's.
And here's a link to the Ormandy/PO Isle of the Dead streaming audio just in case you subscribe to Amazon Prime. The YT link to the same recording, no doubt in lesser sound, is provided above.

https://music.amazon.com/albums/B000QZV ... PDKIKX0DER

maestrob
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:29 am

jserraglio wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:29 am
maestrob wrote:
Wed Jun 06, 2018 10:14 am
jserraglio: As a long time follower of Ormandy's Rachmanninoff, that disc would really appeal to me. The only recording I have of Isle of the Dead from that era is Reiner's.
And here's a link to the Ormandy/PO Isle of the Dead streaming audio just in case you subscribe to Amazon Prime. The YT link to the same recording, no doubt in lesser sound, is provided above.

https://music.amazon.com/albums/B000QZV ... PDKIKX0DER
Many thanks! It's good to know it's still available, even though I don't subscribe to amazon Prime! What treasures there are in the world......

RebLem
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Sat Jun 09, 2018 2:12 am


On Friday, 8 JUN 2018, I listened to 2 CD.
 
1) Sergei Taneyev (1856-1915): Tr. 1-9. Cantata 2, Op. 36 "At the Reading of a Psalm" (69'01)--Mikhail Pletnev, cond., Russian National Orch., St Petersburg State Academic Capella Choir, Boys Choir of the Glinka Choral College. Lolita Semenina, soprano, Marianna Tarassova, alto, Mikhail Gubsky, tenor, Andrei Baturkin, bass. Pentatone Hybrid Multichannel SuperAudio CD, rec. live @ the Philharmonic Hall St. Petersburg, 1-2 MAY 2003. TT: 69'01.
 
Pentatone production packages are works of art in themselves, aside from their contents. This CD is in one of those fold-out booklets, with a CD pressed into a plastic template glued to the inside first page, the the other side is a 76 page (including front and back covers) booklet about the CD. Pages 2-25 are in English, and it has comparable German and French sections. Then near the end we have four pages consisting of the text of the work in four languages, beginning with a Latin-alphabet version of Russian.
 
This work is divided into three movements, each of which, in turn, is divided into three subsections, as follows:
First Movement-- 1 Chorus (5'12), 2 Double Chorus (4'50), 3 Chorus (7'38)
Second Movement--4 Chorus (3'39), 5 Quartet (10'55), 6 Quartet & Chorus (8'40)
Third Movement--7 Interlude (instrumental ending with choral exclamation) (6'20) 8 Alto solo aria (10'22) 9 Double Chorus (10'55)
The work begins with a choral passage: "The earth is trembling /The thunder rolls through the ether. /It is the voice of God. He orders the world: /Israel, my people, listen to me!"
All the other words, whether sung by a chorus, a quartet, or a soloist, represent the voice of God speaking directly to Man. One of the most beautful passages is the one in Tr. 5, sung by the quartet: "I need no incense. It is the breath of flowers, /Smelling sweet beneath the dew, /That showers praise upon me /From all parts of the world."
 
Although the choirs are mixed, basses and baritones seem to set the tone here, as they do in so much of Russian vocal music., and it has a rousing climax as well. Altogether a fine performance of an interesting work. Although it was a late work in Taneyev's output, it is written in a very conservative 19th century musical idiom. Nothing here, I think, that would have made Robert Schumann uncomfortabe.
 
2) A. Bruckner (1824-96): Symphony 7 in E Major (1885)--Karl Bohm, cond., Wiener Philharmoniker, rec. Musikvereinsaal, 4-5 JUN 1943. CD 3 of a 3 CD Tahra set titled "Hommage a Karl Bohm."
 
This was one of the WWII recordings made with a Magnetophon tape recorder, and the sound is magnificent for 1943. It is a broad, generous, flat out gorgeous performance. This CD set, you may recall, is a 3 B's, or maybe 4 B's issue--except Bach is replaced with Bruckner and Bohm is added. Highly recommended.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.


John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:32 am

Back in 1971, Angel issued an LP of ten short choral works by Taneyev on its Melodiya label. It was the first of his music that I had heard and it made a strong impression, so I went on to listen to more and more Taneyev, much of it on Soviet export LPs I found at New York's Four Continents Bookstore. I believe Lenny has seen his opera based on Aeschylus's "Oresteia," but I've never heard any of his music in person, though he composed a fine symphony and several string quartets. (A major Soviet string quartet took Taneyev's name for its own.)

A particular favorite is Taneyev's Concert Suite for violin and orchestra, a large-scale work that just about every important Soviet violinist played and many recorded, but that's little known outside Russia. Here's the second movement, a gavotte, played by Igor Oistrakh:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5ZIwj-QHRM
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:21 am

On Sunday, 10 JUN 2018, I listened to 2 CDs.

1) Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-87): The Four Symphonies |CD 1, Tr. 1-2. Symphony 1 in C Sharp Minor, Op. 18 (1932) (19'30) |Tr. 3-5. Symphony 2 in C Minor, Op. 19 (1934) (25'37) |CD 2, Tr. 1-2. Symphony 3 in B Flat Minor, Op. 22 for orchestra and mixed chorus "Requiem for Lenin" (1933) (19'07) |Tr. 3-6. Symphony 4 in C Major, Op. 54 (1956) ( 412'13)--Eije Oue, cond, NDR Radipphilharmonie (all), NDR Chor & The Choir of Hungarian Radio (Sym. 3) CD 1 of a @ CD cpo set of the four Kabalevsky symphonies by these forces. Rec. Grosser Sendesaal des NDR Landesfunkhauses 2001/2.

Kabalevsky was, in addition to being a composer, an administrator and apparatchik in the Soviet musical system, one of the exponents of "Socialist Realism." He was the only major Soviet composer who never suffered a rebuke from the regime, not even in 1948. The liner notes here are inconsistent about how this affected his relationship with the likes of Shostakovich, for example. At one point, they say relations between the two were very strained, but at another it says their duo piano performances of Beethoven symphonies were legendary among their circle of friends. Take your pick.

A number of the 7 reviewers @ Amazon who reviewed this set have valuable insights. I recommend them to your attention. https://www.amazon.com/Kabalevsky-Symph ... merReviews
The one thing all reviewers seem to agree on is the fact that these are superb performances, and indeed Oue and the MDR do a magnificent job.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Jun 11, 2018 5:13 am

Toscanini conducted the American premiere of Kabalevsky's 2nd symphony in 1942. At the time, with the Soviet Union our World War II ally, it was the patriotic thing to do, as was his performance of Shostakovich's 7th. He repeated it in 1943 and 1945 but never again, such things having become unpatriotic. But Toscanini often conducted the Colas Breugnon overture, a very likeable piece which obviously he liked.
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:02 am

Arrau-Ormandy-Phila O - Liszt PC 1 Columbia ML 4665 LP vinyl

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Last edited by jserraglio on Fri Jun 15, 2018 4:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

John F
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by John F » Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:41 am

I like the cover design featuring the triangle. :)
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jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:23 am

The triangle did not make it to the Masterworks Heritage CD reissue.
Last edited by jserraglio on Fri Jun 15, 2018 4:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:27 am

Uchida - Mozart 2 Sonatas and Rondo Philips LP vinyl

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:14 pm


On Wednesday, 13 JUNE 2018, I listened to one CD.
 
CD 6 of 7 in an RCA set titled "Van Cliburn plays Great Piano Concertos." |Tr. 1-3. L.V. Beethoven (1770-1827): Piano Concerto 4 in G Major, Op. 58 (33'49)--Fritz Reiner, cond., Chicago Symphony Orch., rec. 1963. |Tr. 4-6. Franz Liszt (1811-86): Piano Concerto 1 in E Flat Major, S 124. (18'21) |Tr. 7-32. S. Rachmaninoff (1873-1943): Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43. (24'42)--Eugene Ormandy, cond., Philadelphia Orch. (Tr. 4-32), rec. 1968 (4-6), 1970 (7-32). TT: 76'52).
 
My two favorite sets of the Beethoven Piano Concerti are the Goode/Fischer set and, or course, the old reliable Fleisher/Szell. Cliburn never recorded the first two concerti, but this recording is a worthy effort. Not up to the standard of the best, but very good nevertheless, especially in the middle slow movement, where he lovingly caresses every phrase.
 
The great French pianist Samson Francois recorded the Liszt 1 three times; the best, in my opinion, is his first, from 1954, with Constantin Silvestri and the Philharmonia Orch. That is my favorite recording of this work, by far.
 
Cliburn's Rhapsody is OK, but my favorite is still the Graffman/Bernstein.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Thu Jun 14, 2018 4:21 am

Uchida - Mozart 3 Sonatas Philips LP vinyl

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Thu Jun 14, 2018 9:07 am

Piotr Anderszewski, Mozart PC K.503 ( # 25 ), Vienna Phil. / Altinoglu, Grosse Festivalsaal, June 13,2018 :

https://www.nporadio4.nl/concerten/7894 ... elt-mozart

Magisterial first mov. with interesting cadenza ; dignified , well-shaped yet emotional slow mov. ; spirited yet nostalgic finale.

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Fri Jun 15, 2018 4:31 am

The Grumiaux Trio - Mozart Six Preludes and Fugues (after J.S. & W.F. Bach) Philips LP vinyl

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Fri Jun 15, 2018 5:39 am

Barbara Hendricks, Katia & Marielle Labèque - Barbara Hendricks Sings Gershwin Philips LP vinyl

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:40 am

Eden & Tamir - Music For Two Pianos: Rachmaninov, Milhaud, Lutoslawski, Poulenc London CS 6434

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Fri Jun 15, 2018 10:39 pm


On Friday, 15 JUNE 2018, I listened to 2 CDs.
 
1) Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713): Sonate da Chiesa a tre, Op. 3, #s 1-9: |Tr. 1-4. 1 in F Major (6'49) |Tr. 5-8. 2 in D Major (7'58) |Tr. 9-12. 3 in B Flat Major (6'15) |Tr. 13-16. 4 in B Minor (7'43) |Tr. 17-20. 5 in D Minor (6'34) |Tr. 21-24. 6 in G Major (5'42) |Tr. 25-28. 7 in E Minor (6'30) |Tr. 29-32. 8 in C Major (7'18) |Tr. 33-36. 9 in F Minor (6'38)--Pieter-Jan Belder, organ & cond., Remy Baudet, Sayuri Yamagata, violins, Albert Bruggen, viola, David van Ooijen, archlute.--CD 4 of a 10 CD Brilliant Classics set of the complete works of Arcangelo Corelli.
 
These sonatas are more than the usual baroque dithering. These are all brief, four movement sonatas and mostly slow pieces, and soulful. Somehow, they seem to have an autumnal feel to them.
 
2) Ture Rangstrom (1884-1947): |Tr. 1-3. Symphony 2 in D Minor "Mitt Land" (1919) (37'30) |Tr. 4-8. Intermezzo drammatico (1916-18) (16'25)--Michail Jurowski, cond., Norrkoping Symphony Orch. CD 2 of a 3 CD cpo set including all 4 of the Rangstrom symphonies, rec. AUG 1995 Konzerthaus "Louis de Geer," Norrkoping, Sweden.
 

I found two sympathetic (with reservations) 4 star reviews of this CD on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Rangstrom-Sympho ... gstrom+CDs
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Jun 16, 2018 11:44 am

Alfred Cortot Schumann Carnaval Chopin Etudes Nocturnes Japan EMI GR 2197 LP vinyl


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Re: What I listened to today

Post by RebLem » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:50 am


On Sunday, 17 JUNE 2018, I listened to 4 CDs.
 
1) CD 24 of the 24 CD set entitled "Gary Graffman: The Complete RCA & Columbia Album Collection." It consists of 18 tracks of music from the Woody Allen film MANHATTAN, all by George Gershwin (1898-1937). The album notes credit Zubin Mehta as the conductor with the NYPO, but I have information from Wikipedia that says Tracks 3, 7, & 18 were recorded by the Buffalo Philharmonic. Graffman is the pianst only in Track 1. Dick Hyman is the pianist in Tracks 6 & 11. All the others are orchestra only. No vocalists. A number of musicians from outside the orchestra are on Track 11, but I am not going to list them all. Music in some places orchestrated and adapted by Tom Pierson. |Tr. 1. Rhapsody in Blue (16'35) |Tr. 2. Land of the Gay Caballero (0'35). |Tr. 3. Someone to Watch Over Me (3'26) |Tr. 4. I've Got a Crush on You (0'44) |Tr. 5. Do, Do, Do (1'56) |Tr. 6. Mine (3'00) |Tr. 7. He Loves and She Loves (1'19) |Tr. 8. Bronco Busters (1'18) |Tr. 9. Oh, Lady Be Good! (0'58) |Tr. 10. 'S Wonderful (1'04) |Tr. 11. Love is Here to Stat (2'46) |Tr. 12. Sweet and Low-Down (0'47) |Tr. 13. Blue Blue Blue (0'40) |Tr. 14. Embraceable You (1'49) |Tr. 15. He Loves and She Loves (1'19) |Tr. 16. Love is Sweeping the Country/Land of the Gay Caballero (0'43) |Tr. 17. Strike Up the Band (0'37) |Tr. 18. But Not for Me (1'12). Rec. Columbia 30th St. Studio, NYC 7 MAR 1979, at least per liner notes. I am skeptical.
 
Obviously great music, somewhat marred by the fact that a lot of it was truncated for the film. The Rhapsody is the highlight here, and its a wonderfully idiomatic performance.
 
2) L. V. Beethoven (1770-1827): |Tr. 1-4. Symphony 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 (63'17) |Tr. 5. Leonore Overture III in C Major, Op. 72a (13'38)--Fritz Busch, cond., Danish RSO (Tr. 1-5) & Chorus, Kerstin Lindberg-Torlind, soprano, Else Jena, mezzo-soprano, Eric Sjoberg, tenor, Holger Byrding, bass (Tr. 1-4). Rec. 7 SEP 1950 (Tr. 1-4), 24 OCT 1949 (Tr. 5). GUILD Records.
 
This Ninth is a very well executed MOR performance. The only thing a little unusual is that like a very few other conductors, Fritz Busch does not speed up as much in the final two minutes as most other conductors do. He speeds up just a tad, but not much. The vocal quartet is a very well matched one; not a weak performer among them and they gel unusually well with each other.
 
Leonore III is also an excellent performance. This CD is another example of a point I have made before. This orchestra, variously called the Danish Radio Symphony, The Danish National RSO, or the Danish State RSO, is a far better orchestra than its reputation and has been for a long time.
 
3) Frank Bridge (1879-1941): |Tr. 1. Rhapsody, H. 174 (1927) "Enter Spring" (18'36) |Tr. 2, Isabella, Symphonic Poem after Keats, H. 78 (1907) (18'00) |Tr. 3-4. Two Poems for Orchestra after Richard Jeffries, H., 118 (1915) (12'58) |Tr. 5. Mid of the Night, symphonic poem for orchestra, H. 30 (1903) (26'05)--Richard Hickox, cond., BBC National Orch. of Wales. Rec. Brangwyn Hall, Swansea, 26-27 NOV 2000. CD 1 of a 6 CD set of Bridge's complete orchestral music performed by these forces. CHANDOS.
 
All these works, from his very first orchestral work, the Mid of the Night, through the latest of them on this CD, "Enter Spring" from 1927, are in a late romantic idiom. This is somewhat startling for someone like me, who knows Frank Bridge primarily from a few chamber pieces and the fact that he was the most important teacher and mentor in the life of Benjamin Britten, whom I would classify, to the extent that he is classifiable, as a neo-classicist. But, nevertheless, there you have it.
 
4) CD 1 of a 5 CD Tahra set titled "Hommage a Hermann Scherchen" |Tr. 1-17. J.S. Bach (1685-1750): The Musical Offering, S. 1079 (47'29) |Tr. 18. Scherchen rehearses: L.V. Beethoven (1770-1827): Symphony 8 in F Major, Op. 93 (1812) (22'19)--Hermann Scherchen, cond. (all), members of the Vienna Symphony Orch., 23 JUN 1950 (Tr. 1-17), l'Orchestre de la RTSI Lugano (Tr. 18, March 1965).
 
This set is a puzzle. OTOH (On the one hand), it is, in some respects, a luxurious and generous offering. The accompanying booklet (in French & English, but, suprisingly, not German) extends to 146 pages. It is loaded with documentation on Scherchen, his career and his personal life, with lots of photos, all in black & white except for one color photograph of the cemetery where he is buried on the inside back cover, page 145. Pics of his family, and posters announcing various concerts, and pages from concert programs throughout his career abound. During his captivity in Russia as a civilian POW in WWI, he learned to read Russian and read Russian literature, particularly Dostoyevsky, in the original for the rest of his life. He seems to have turned every misfortune into an opportunity. The booklet spends a great deal of time exponding on his love for the music of Arnold Schoenberg, and in fact, the set includes a performance of Act 2 Scene 3 of Moses und Aron and in fact, the box includes a separate 16 page booklet, again in French and English, of the text to the Scene, entitled, "The Dance Around the Golden Calf." And yet, there is no detail per track on the CDs. Just the information on timings I have in the headnote. In that respect, this is a bare bones production.
 

Per Wikipedia, "The Musical Offering (German title: Musikalisches Opfer or Das Musikalische Opfer), BWV 1079, is a collection of keyboard canons and fugues and other pieces of music by Johann Sebastian Bach, all based on a single musical theme given to him by Frederick the Great (Frederick II of Prussia), to whom they are dedicated. The Ricercar a 6, a six-voice fugue which is regarded as the highpoint of the entire work, was put forward by the musicologist Charles Rosen as the most significant piano composition in history (partly because it is one of the first).[1] This ricercar is also occasionally called the Prussian Fugue, a name used by Bach himself."

This performance is very brightly recorded, and the sound is rather harsh. Because of that, I do not recommend it.
The Beethoven 8th is a rehearsal, none of which, of course, is in English. We do get to hear quite a lot of Scherchen's voice, which is rich with staccato bursts, and lots of rapid speech and clipped, crisp, sharp directions. He sounds rather intimidating, but the orchestra seems to respond well to his direction. Their respect for him is palpable.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

jserraglio
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Mon Jun 18, 2018 4:14 am

Thibaud / Cortot - Sonatas For Violin & Piano FRANCK / FAURE LP Angel JAPAN LP vinyl

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Rach3
Posts: 201
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Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Wed Jun 20, 2018 3:55 pm

Piano Sonata No.2 ( 1956 ) of Brazil's Edino Krieger , Laís de Souza Brasil, piano :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-iEbyuLmyM

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