Was This Secular Music:

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
dulcinea
Posts: 3464
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 5:39 pm
Location: tampa, fl

Was This Secular Music:

Post by dulcinea » Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:40 pm

the wedding march of A MIDSUMMER'S NIGHT DREAM, the idem of LOHENGRIN, and the FUNERAL MARCH of that Chopin sonata deliberately intended to be used as sacred music?
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

John F
Posts: 18862
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by John F » Wed Nov 22, 2017 6:09 pm

No.
John Francis

diegobueno
Winds Specialist
Posts: 2374
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 2:26 pm
Contact:

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by diegobueno » Wed Nov 22, 2017 9:05 pm

As Ira Gershwin once wrote:

It's never too late to Mendelssohn
Two hearts are at journey's endelssohn.
Whate'er their future, they must share it.
I trust they Lohengrin and bear it.

(Lyric from Kurt Weill's Lady in the Dark)

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26080
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by jbuck919 » Thu Nov 23, 2017 1:20 am

John F wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 6:09 pm
No.
Correct, but the funeral march (in some kind of arrangement, I assume, was used at Chopin's own funeral). Churches have largely gotten away from the Lohengrin and Mendelssohn, and some even forbid their use at weddings.The Mendelssohn can at least be played in toto as the recessional_+ postlude, but no one wants to wait for the organist to reach what she considers an artistic stopping point once the bride ends her procession.There aren't that many church weddings in the US anymore anyway. Therefore gets mauled in various ways. Except for the RC church (and maybe the orthodox) who do not allow it, most weddings take take place in the location of the reception. I've only played for one wedding in the 16 years I've lived in north country, while in Maryland it was more like five a year.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

John F
Posts: 18862
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by John F » Thu Nov 23, 2017 5:22 am

Seems like wedding music nowadays is whatever the bride wants. I've heard of a number of random classical selections (like the Pachelbel canon, now perhaps passé), rock songs if any can be found with appropriate lyrics, whatever.
John Francis

barney
Posts: 2661
Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:12 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by barney » Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:02 am

John F wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 5:22 am
Seems like wedding music nowadays is whatever the bride wants. I've heard of a number of random classical selections (like the Pachelbel canon, now perhaps passé), rock songs if any can be found with appropriate lyrics, whatever.
O tempora, o mores!

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9794
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by karlhenning » Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:41 am

John F wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 5:22 am
Seems like wedding music nowadays is whatever the bride wants. I've heard of a number of random classical selections (like the Pachelbel canon, now perhaps passé), rock songs if any can be found with appropriate lyrics, whatever.
As long as there are weddings in the US, there will Pachelbel be played.

Cheers,
~k.

Separately:

Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26080
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by jbuck919 » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:21 am

karlhenning wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:41 am
John F wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 5:22 am
Seems like wedding music nowadays is whatever the bride wants. I've heard of a number of random classical selections (like the Pachelbel canon, now perhaps passé), rock songs if any can be found with appropriate lyrics, whatever.
As long as there are weddings in the US, there will Pachelbel be played.

Cheers,
~k.

Separately:

Another example of a piece that is too long to be used for a processional, which is how it is always used. Ditto Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring. Almost everybody getting married only knows a tiny handful of classical pieces, and thing they're being sophisticated by asking for one of them. Yes, that sounds condescending, but people should be better educated in classical music than they are.

Interesting, when the Crown Prince of Denmark the march named after one of his predecessor was not used. Instead they made the inscrutable choice of "Zadok the Priest."

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

John F
Posts: 18862
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 4:41 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by John F » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:40 am

I don't believe it has to do with sophistication, pretended or otherwise. Partly it's custom, doing as others do, so that the ceremony feels like a proper wedding with all the trimmings. And partly it may be that because a traditional wedding ceremony is a special occasion, with the bride in a white gown she will never wear again etc., it calls for special music. Since there is no liturgical music for a wedding, not as far as I know, appropriate secular music is used. Which brings us back to dulcinea's topic.
John Francis

Beckmesser
Posts: 444
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 12:11 pm
Location: Columbia/Westchester Counties NY

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by Beckmesser » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:36 pm

When my wife and I got married in Dwight Chapel at Yale (oh so many years ago) an organist friend of mine in the School of Music supplied the music as his gift to us. Before the ceremony he played Bach's Toccata and Fugue in F Major (which sounded marvelous on the chapel's baroque-style organ). For the recessional he played the Toccata movement from the Widor Symphony No. 5. It was a lovely gift.

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26080
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Re: Was This Secular Music:

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Nov 24, 2017 7:41 am

Beckmesser wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:36 pm
When my wife and I got married in Dwight Chapel at Yale (oh so many years ago) an organist friend of mine in the School of Music supplied the music as his gift to us. Before the ceremony he played Bach's Toccata and Fugue in F Major (which sounded marvelous on the chapel's baroque-style organ). For the recessional he played the Toccata movement from the Widor Symphony No. 5. It was a lovely gift.
Now that's a program. Bach is almost always appropriate, even in his non-liturgical works. In higher-end churches, the Widor Toccata is a common and excellent selection. Marcel Dupré played it for the wedding of the Duke of Windsor and Mrs. Simpson. You didn't say, though, whether there was a processional. That's harder to do successfully with Bach because he is definitely a composer you don't want to cut short.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 17 guests