Cameron Carpenter, organist

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 17389
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Cameron Carpenter, organist

Post by Lance » Fri May 18, 2018 9:14 pm

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com ... _QL65_.jpg
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com ... RQ4XFL.jpg
Sony 79688, comes with DVD offering music clips and a short documentary "Birth of the International Touring organ."

Listening today to Cameron Carpenter's debut recording on his "International Touring organ," an instrument built to his very own specifications using digitzed sounds from instruments from across the globe. He says, "My vision is to keep the best of the classical organ - its emotional magnitude, its sonic range, its coloristic drama - but to liberate these from the pipe organ's immobility, its moving parts, its cost, its institutionality. I want the 'American Classic' cathedral organ to combine with its counterpart, the cinema organ, in a single instrument. It will be ethereal and rhythmless at times - and at other times more rhythmically intense than any pipe organ in the world."

Carpenter is taking the route of Virgil Fox with a "touring organ," which makes sense in a way since one can't haul around the finest pipe organs in the world in the back of one's car. Carpenter's takeoff on JS Bach's prelude from the Cello Suite No. 1 is heard in an interesting way, one you've never heard before. Hopefully can read the contents of what's on this set, but I was also taken with the last piece, J. S. Bach's Organ Sonata No. 6 in G Major, BWV 530.

This "International Touring Organ" is quite spectacular in its natural acoustic and range, and with a large variety of sounds. Whether we like it or not (the purists will hate it), I suppose there is very little difference in Bach's keyboard works written to be played on the harpsichord or clavichord and today are mostly performed on an altogether different sounding keyboard: the piano.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Marc
Posts: 309
Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2007 4:45 pm

Re: Cameron Carpenter, organist

Post by Marc » Sat May 19, 2018 1:11 am


Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 17389
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Re: Cameron Carpenter, organist

Post by Lance » Sat May 19, 2018 11:48 am

jbuck, I don't know if I ever asked you if you knew or heard of Jonathan Biggers, originally from Atlanta, Ga., but was professor of organ and harpsichord here until he passed away, aged 56 in September 2016, unexpectedly. He was also the music department's chair at Binghamton University at one time. He played all over the world, made a few recordings and we became friends, as I usually did with university staff.

Here is a link, one of many one can find.

https://www.pressconnects.com/story/new ... /93108204/
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 32 guests