Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

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lennygoran
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Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by lennygoran » Sat Jun 01, 2019 6:25 am

There are 100 clips-the first 10 are shown in one of the photos but you can scroll and see all 100 if you can get to the site. Regards, Len

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Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

They react by playing an unscheduled work, Elgar’s “Nimrod,” which is often used for deaths and tragedies.

By Michael Cooper

May 31, 2019

For months, the management of the financially struggling Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has tried to negotiate cutting the number of weeks it pays its musicians to 40 weeks from 52. And its players have resisted, arguing that such a move would weaken the quality of the ensemble.

On Thursday afternoon the orchestra’s management announced that it was unilaterally canceling its summer season — which was to have begun with a new music festival on June 19.

So the atmosphere was charged when the orchestra gathered in the evening to play their scheduled concert, Beethoven’s “Emperor” concerto, at its hall in Baltimore.

As the concert began, Brian Prechtl, a percussionist who is one of the chairmen of the players’ committee, strode to the front of the stage and announced that the musicians had been shocked that afternoon to learn of the cancellation — and said that the musicians had been told that they would not be paid after June 16. The audience responded with loud boos.

“We are stunned and grieve for our beloved B.S.O.,” Mr. Prechtl said. “We will be making music with even more passion and purpose tonight and for as long as our management keeps the lights on and the doors unlocked.”

Then the players performed an unscheduled selection: Elgar’s “Nimrod,” one of his “Enigma” variations, which orchestras have often performed to mark deaths or tragedies.

Their music director, Marin Alsop, conducted.

“The Baltimore Symphony is a truly great orchestra,” Ms. Alsop said in an email. “Our city deserves this wonderful asset and treasure and I hope for the best for both the B.S.O. and Baltimore.”

Management officials said Friday that they had not reduced the musicians’ paid weeks “at present” even though they had canceled the summer season; they said they would continue to try to negotiate the proposed changes. Orchestra officials said that they needed to make the cuts to stay afloat, after repeatedly running deficits and incurring what they described as $16 million in losses over the last decade.


“These decisions were extremely difficult to make and were not entered into lightly, but they are the right ones if the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is going to continue to exist as a nationally renowned organization,” Peter Kjome, the orchestra’s president and chief executive, said in a statement. “If the B.S.O. is going to survive, our business model needs to change, and that change begins in earnest today.”

The orchestra’s management said that it proposed cutting paid weeks mostly during the summer, and by reducing the musicians’ paid vacation to four weeks from nine weeks.

Mr. Prechtl said in an interview on Friday that he was puzzled that management would enact the cuts just after Maryland state lawmakers had approved $3.2 million in aid for the orchestra. He said that if management were to stop paying the musicians, it would effectively be a lockout.

The orchestra’s management noted that a number of large orchestras have cut weeks and said that they continued to uphold high standards. But Mr. Prechtl noted that the orchestra was holding auditions for several positions, and questioned whether it would still be able to attract top talent with a shorter season and all the strife.

The orchestra has undertaken a number of well-received tours in recent years and made a number of acclaimed recordings, including of the work of Leonard Bernstein:




https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/31/arts ... eason.html

John F
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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by John F » Sat Jun 01, 2019 9:04 am

A member of the orchestra, Laurie Sokoloff, who plays piccolo, was in CompuServe Music Forum for a while. Another music forum member, John Graves, and I used to go to Baltimore for concerts when Yuri Temirkanov was music director; there was some very fine music making back then. (We're not so interested in the orchestra's current music director, Marin Alsop, and haven't been to Baltimore since she took over.) I believe Laurie retired in recent years, so she may not be affected by all this - hope her pension is intact.
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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by maestrob » Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:02 am

Back in 1987, when David Zinman was conducting the Baltimore Symphony, PBS broadcast a fabulous mix of jazz and classical music coming from Baltimore, featuring the likes of Mel Torme, Dianne Schuur and Wynton Marsalis in cabaret performances interspersed with Richard Stolzman (clarinet) and Mel Torme (on drums!) playing with the orchestra in their home hall. One of the highlights was John Adams's "Short Ride in a Fast Machine" played at midnight by the orchestra. It was a great broadcast, and the orchestra shone under Zinman. He, too, made some very successful recordings, including Rachmaninoff's Symphonic Dances. Alsop tried to record Brahms, but I became discouraged when I heard Brahms I, and just haven't paid attention since, although her Bernstein series has received some notice. None of her recordings, either with Baltimore or her other orchestra (Sao Paolo in Brazil) TMK has been accorded much appreciation in the press that I've seen.

I wish them well, of course, but lack of funding is affecting the classical music world here in NY as well, and Baltimore is a troubled city at the moment.

lennygoran
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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by lennygoran » Sat Jun 01, 2019 7:47 pm

John F wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 9:04 am
Another music forum member, John Graves, and I used to go to Baltimore for concerts when Yuri Temirkanov was music director
John yes I remember you mentioning that when we were in the CS forum-I never had the chance to meet John Graves. Regards, Len

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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by John F » Tue Jun 04, 2019 2:08 am

When Marin Alsop succeeded Yuri Temirkanov as the orchestra's music director, it was expected or at least hoped that she would be able to turn the situation around, both by attracting a larger audience We saw many empty seats at Temirkanov's Sunday concerts) and through community involvement such as in her tenure with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra. But according to this story, the orchestra has lost $16 milllion in the last 10 years, all of them on her watch. Perhaps sensing that this ship may be sinking, she has taken on another orchestra in addition to the Baltimore and the São Paulo State Symphony Orchestra, it's the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, as of the end of her contract in São Paulo. In Vienna at least the state-supported orchestra won't depend on her.

It's past time for a hard conversation about the BSO
Baltimore Sun Editorial Board
May 31, 2019

The long-simmering problems that have long beset the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra bloomed into a full debacle Thursday when the BSO management suddenly canceled a summer concert series just hours before musicians went on stage to perform a Beethoven piano concerto and other works. It was shocking to symphony patrons, musicians who are now faced with a 20 percent pay cut, and lawmakers who thought they had worked out a deal to avoid just such an outcome. Plenty of people share some blame for the way these latest developments went down, but we can’t let the anger of the moment distract us from the big picture reality that the BSO, like orchestras all across the country, faces tremendous financial pressures and must adapt if it is to survive.

BSO management, led by CEO Peter Kjome, deserves some blame for failing, amid the months of discussion about additional state support for the symphony during this year’s legislative session, to make clear just how close to the fiscal edge the orchestra is. It’s no secret that the BSO has been losing money for years — $16 million over the last decade — but the fact that even with the extra funding Del. Maggie McIntosh wrangled the symphony will struggle to meet payroll this summer was not widely understood. Given those circumstances, the announcement in April of an ambitious summer schedule seems foolish.
BSO musicians protest cuts to schedule

Lawmakers thought they were buying the orchestra enough time to re-examine its costs, raise more money for its endowment and develop a sustainable fiscal structure that would not entail sacrifices on this scale for the musicians. If that wasn’t the case, the BSO management should have said so before Thursday. (In fairness to Mr. Kjome, these problems began long before he arrived in Baltimore. At least he’s trying to fix them rather than hoping they’ll miraculously go away.)

It’s clear, though, that the orchestra would be in a much better position if Gov. Larry Hogan had agreed to spend the $3.2 million over two years that Del. Maggie McIntosh and others worked for months to secure in the state budget. Legislators can’t add money to the budget or shift it from one priority to another, but they can make cuts in the governor’s proposal and dictate that the money can only be used for a particular purpose, in this case helping the BSO. But the governor doesn’t have to spend the money. He can leave it in the state’s accounts, and he’s been known to do that before, including a refusal to release millions for schools in Baltimore and elsewhere early in his first term. Why it has taken him months to make up his mind about this expenditure, we have no idea. His indecision and the uncertainty it has caused have exacerbated a bad situation.

As for the musicians, their outrage is understandable. They have been jerked around on the summer season this year, and they have every right to be upset at the prospect of losing a fifth of their pay. Who wouldn’t be? They are world-class artists, and the orchestra’s financial problems can’t be blamed on the quality of their musicianship.
BSO's Prechtl talks about shortened season

But we do need to make a distinction between the current musicians and the orchestra as an institution. Much of the players’ argument has been that the management’s proposal to control costs amounts to shifting the BSO to a part-time orchestra, but the truth is that it would have little impact on the number of concerts each year. The main season, running from September to June, is about 150 concerts now, and it would still be if the management proposal is enacted. The summer season (with the exception of the Oregon Ridge concert on the 4th of July, which Mr. Kjome says he hopes to restore after this year) has never been a core part of the orchestra’s schedule.

The difference is that musicians now get nine weeks of paid vacation per year, and management is proposing four. (Musicians also get two additional weeks of guaranteed relief time so that they can recover from particularly demanding performances.) Musicians would be paid for fewer of the weeks in which they wouldn’t be performing anyway, hence the pay cut.
Some musicians who can get jobs with bigger, better paying orchestras might do so under those circumstances, but the idea that the BSO’s quality would inexorably decline is belied by the experience of orchestras in other cities — Atlanta, St. Louis and Detroit, for example — that have gone through similar financial retrenchments and maintained their artistry and reputations.

Where do we go from here? Governor Hogan needs to release the funds, even if it’s not in time to save the summer season. The BSO’s finances are precarious,and it needs some breathing room while it continues contract negotiations with the musicians. But more state funding isn’t the long-term answer. The BSO is already, by far, the largest recipient of state grants to arts institutions. It needs to take steps to put its books in balance. The state funding bill required the creation of a blue-ribbon commission to examine the BSO’s finances, and that needs to be given time to find cost savings that have a less dire impact on the musicians and the product. Musicians need to be prepared to make some concessions on things like vacation time and health care cost sharing. And finally, Baltimore’s patrons of the arts need to commit to a major capital campaign for the BSO. It compares favorably to its peer orchestras in most respects — annual giving, ticket revenue, etc. — but not in the size of its endowment and hence the amount it can safely draw every year to support operations. If the BSO’s endowment was the size of the St. Louis symphony’s, we wouldn’t be having this conversation.

One more thing: Many of the other U.S. symphonies that have gone through a financial crisis like this have only emerged after a lengthy lockout of musicians. For the sake of the BSO’s tradition, of Baltimore’s music lovers and of all the children who benefit from the symphony's educational programs, we hope that won’t happen here.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/opinion/ed ... story.html
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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by maestrob » Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:09 am

Well, I'm glad nobody's blaming attendance revenue or Alsop's musical quality at least. Now that the economy has recovered from the crash of 2008, maybe some donors will come up with chunks of cash for the endowment. The truth is that orchestras are expensive, and less and less relevant as interest in the general public seems to dwindle year by year. The only thing that will save Baltimore is a star conductor (Alsop isn't one) like Dudamel, but that's not likely to happen.

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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by John F » Mon Jun 17, 2019 12:08 pm

I'd say Yuri Temirkanov, Alsop's predecessor in Baltimore, is a star conductor, but in fact attendance fell during his time there, possibly because of his programming (lots of Russian music) and partly because he wasn't into community relations as Alsop is. Friends and I traveled to Baltimore for quite a few of his concerts, attending the weekend matinee, and the hall was seldom as much as half full. His precursor, David Zinman, was no star, but the orchestra did well during his 13 years there.

The basic reason for the orchestra's plight seems to be explained in this article. It seems to be a combination of private fundraising for the endowment having failed, and the governor not releasing money the state legislature has appropriated. The latter can be fixed; the former, maybe not.

The BSO's financial situation was much worse than most people realized, documents and interviews reveal
Mary Carole McCauley
June 14, 2019

Until the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra canceled its summer season, few people outside the nonprofit’s administrative offices realized just how precarious its financial situation was. But when President and CEO Peter Kjome referred to a promised $3.2 million in state funds as “a lifeline,” he wasn’t exaggerating.

Financial documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun and interviews with three of the symphony’s key decision-makers reveal that the organization’s efforts were predicated on the thinnest of margins — and wishful thinking. Without the funds promised by the state to support the summer season, the orchestra would end its fiscal year with an approximately $1.5 million deficit. Even with that money, the symphony would conclude that year on Aug. 31 all but broke — and that’s assuming that the funds were released promptly, that the organization obtained a bridge loan and that nothing else went wrong over the summer...

In hindsight, asking the General Assembly for more money was a desperation move, the classical music equivalent of a Hail Mary pass. From the time Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat, introduced House Bill 1404 in late February, the odds were it wouldn’t achieve its intended goal of keeping the orchestra playing through the summer.

Interviews with Kjome; Barbara Bozzuto, chairwoman of the symphony’s board of directors; and Sarah Beckwith, the organization’s chief financial officer, reveal that the BSO had a tiny window of time after the bill became law to either obtain the state funds or arrange a bridge loan to mount the slate of summer concerts it announced in late April. “We were candid when we talked about the severity of our cash flow issues,” Bozzuto said. “But in retrospect, we could have been even more forceful.”

On May 30, the Symphony abruptly canceled the summer concerts it trumpeted just five weeks earlier. Orchestra management resurrected a proposal to slash its season from 52 weeks to 40 — and hack musicians’ pay roughly 20 percent, leaving 75 people with mortgages or rents, tuition payments and medical bills two weeks to come up with alternate sources of income. Kjome cited $16 million in losses over the past decade.


“We thought we were going to have a lifeline of $1.6 million soon,” Kjome said of the state funding it was due in the state fiscal year starting July 1. “We care deeply about our musicians, but it was necessary to make the decisions we did due to the severity of our financial challenges.”

McIntosh was taken aback when she learned that the summer season had been canceled after weeks of hard work on her part. “At no point did I get that this dramatic action would be taken,” she said. “Nobody ever said that. Everybody was then shocked that as of July 1, they’d run out of money. That was never a part of any discussion.”

A BSO cash forecast dated Dec. 7, shows the arts organization anticipated it would close its fiscal year about $1.2 million in the hole. By April 19, a new cash forecast projected the deficit for the year to increase to $1.51 million, largely because contributions hadn’t kept pace with projections. “Results from contributed revenue this year have been low,” Kjome acknowledged. He said that fundraising for the prior fiscal year, “was extremely strong,” and that several of those donors said they wouldn’t be able to maintain that level of support every year.

(Last summer, the orchestra toured Ireland and the United Kingdom. Funds for the trip did not come from its operating budget but were raised specifically for the tour.)
Greg Mulligan, co-chairman of the BSO Musicians Players Committee, thinks that possible donors were angered by the proposal to shorten the season, which first was discussed last fall. “There have been large donors who have told us that they’re not going to give their legacy gifts to the BSO this year...,” he said. “We think there is money sitting on the sidelines waiting for the contract dispute to be resolved.”

The BSO’s annual operating budget draws roughly $3.6 million a year from its $60 million endowment to support its operations. If the BSO could increase its endowment to $100 million, Kjome has said, it could draw almost $2 million more a year — or roughly the sum needed to break even at the group’s current spending levels, assuming its current donation rate remains constant.

But longtime donor Joseph Meyerhoff II, a member of the symphony’s endowment board, wrote in a letter to the editor that the large donations the BSO needs are nearly impossible to secure. “The Meyerhoff family offered a $4 million challenge grant in 2017-2018 to raise funds for the endowment. We met with or called every large foundation in Baltimore and at least two dozen of Baltimore’s wealthiest citizens. We came away empty-handed. No one was interested in investing more than $250,000 in the BSO, when it needs multi-million-dollar gifts.”

Orchestras nationwide face daunting financial challenges inherent to performing a canon of music composed for a full-sized orchestra of between 70 and 100 musician, said Robert J. Flanagan, professor emeritus in the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. (The BSO’s roster includes 75 players.) “Probably the most fundamental problem that orchestras face is when budgeting isn’t done realistically,” said Flanagan, author of the 2012 book “The Perilous Life of Symphony Orchestras: Artistic Triumphs and Economic Challenges.” “Instead,” he said, “budgets are based on unrealistic hopes of what the revenues will be rather than what past history shows the revenues are likely to be.”

Flanagan emphasized that he isn’t familiar with the BSO’s finances. But he said that “it’s reasonable to surmise” that an orchestra that has experienced $16 million in losses over the past decade has been hampered by flawed and inaccurate budget assumptions.

After House Bill 1404 passed both houses of the General Assembly, the first-year appropriation of $1.6 million was penciled into the BSO’s forecast, Beckwith said. Had the symphony received the additional state funds, it would have ended its fiscal year with not quite $90,000 in the bank — assuming it could bring in a projected $3.8 million in contributions in the last five months of the fiscal year. For an organization with a $28 million budget, ending the year with so little money is scraping the bottom of the barrel. “We’d have had a very small amount in our operating accounts,” Beckwith acknowledged. “We’d have been able to barely balance the budget.”

Such a tight budget is not unusual in the arts community, said Randy Cohen, vice president of Americans for the Arts. “A lot of arts organizations work very close to the margins. That’s just a fact,” Cohen said. “Every year as much as a third of arts institutions carry some kind of operating deficit.”

Compounding the problem, the symphony had just two months — July and August — to secure the first-year allocation of $1.6 million. Launching the summer season and paying the musicians through it would have required taking advantage of the difference between the state’s and the BSO’s respective fiscal years. The first $1.6 million installment was allocated to be distributed during the state’s 2019-20 fiscal year, which begins July 1. But the Symphony’s current budget year with its anticipated $1.5 million shortfall runs through Aug. 31. If the orchestra either received the $1.6 million in July or August or received a guarantee that the funds would arrive soon, it could have borrowed against its future windfall to meet its “urgent” current obligations, Kjome said.

The symphony’s leaders experienced a surge of optimism May 24, when it became clear that House Bill 1404 was not on Hogan’s final list of vetoes. But their relief was short-lived. “We have had conversations with a number of leaders in Annapolis,” Kjome said. “After the bill became law, there were additional conversations about the timing of when the allocation would be authorized.” The short answer was that it wasn't clear when or even if the $1.6 million would become available. Instead, Kjome, Bozzuto and Beckwith were told that the governor was hesitating to release funds for several projects, of which the BSO’s $1.6 million grant represents just a fraction.


Hogan, speaking at an event Thursday in East Baltimore, said he would “probably not” release the money. He said the orchestra already has received plenty of state assistance, the most of any arts group in the state.

The $1.9 million the orchestra already received this year is more than 74 percent greater than the next highest grant recipient, the Baltimore Museum of Art, according to Michael Ricci, Hogan’s director of communications. Hogan’s administration also provided a $750,000 grant to the symphony last year. Ricci said those funds were intended to be “one-time relief” while the organization made structural changes.

“We continually pour millions and millions of dollars into the BSO, but they’ve got real serious issues and problems with the management, with losing the support of their donor base and the legislature took the money out of the budget and fenced it off,” the Republican governor said. “So I don’t know what the resolution is going to be.”

While House Bill 1404 became law May 28, the BSO board voted unanimously at a special May 29 meeting to cancel the summer concerts and renew efforts to reduce the orchestra from a 52-week to a 40-week ensemble, Bozzuto said. (Whether musicians are paid for a 40-week season or a 52-week season is a matter for contract negotiations. When concerts are scheduled is not.)

Making the situation even more perilous is that the orchestra’s most recent audited financial statements, for the fiscal year ending Aug. 31, 2018, have not yet been released. In that document, which orchestra officials expect to be completed in weeks, the auditors will either declare that the BSO continues to be a “going concern” with sufficient resources to remain in business or it’s not.

A determination that a business or organization is not a going concern is extremely rare, according to J.P. Krahel, an associate professor of accounting at Loyola University Maryland. “Usually an audit is not meant to judge the quality of a business,” Krahel said. “It usually just says that what the business is telling you is honest. The exception is that if the auditors feel the business might not survive, they’ll put a note to that effect in the audit opinion as a warning to potential lenders. It is essentially the kiss of death. It means that the business is already on life support and it would be pulling the plug.”

Kjome said the orchestra is in discussions to borrow $1 million from the state to support its current operations. “It is very important to all of us that when our audited financial statement is issued that it reflect the fact that the BSO will continue to serve our community and operate for many years to come,” he said.

The musicians, meanwhile, fear the paycheck they received Friday will be their last until the fall and health insurance will run out July 1. Austin Larson, a horn player for the orchestra, said musicians initially were dumbfounded and then furious by the news of the summer season’s cancellation.“The musicians went through such great lengths to get this bridge funding through to help the orchestra out,” he said. “The whole idea behind the bill was to keep the orchestra playing. How can we trust management in the future after they have betrayed us like this?”

https://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainm ... story.html
John Francis

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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by John F » Mon Jun 17, 2019 5:45 pm

The Baltimore Symphony, Seeking Cuts, Locks Out Its Musicians
By Michael Cooper
June 17, 2019

The cash-strapped Baltimore Symphony Orchestra locked out its musicians on Monday, as it sought to pressure the players into agreeing to a new contract with fewer paid weeks of work.

“Due to the Baltimore Symphony’s urgent need to address longstanding financial issues and change its business model, the B.S.O. has made this extremely difficult decision,” Peter Kjome, the orchestra’s president and chief executive officer, said in a statement...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/17/arts ... ion%2Farts
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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by maestrob » Tue Jun 18, 2019 11:26 am

Cutting the orchestra's season from 52 weeks to 40 really does downgrade the group, I'm afraid.

Incidentally, I disagree with you about David Zinman: he's an excellent conductor in repertoire from Beethoven to Rachmaninoff, with fine attention to detail, tempo and energy level in whatever he leads: his Beethoven recordings are quite good, both symphonies and concerti. He led one of my competition winners as Tosca in a summer appearance out West and she reported to me that she was very surprised by his knowledge of the opera and confidence during preparation.

As for Temirkanov, I'm not surprised by his success in Russian music, but I've never heard him be successful in other repertoire. My knowledge of him is limited, so I'll defer to your judgement there. The few recordings I have simply did not impress me, however.

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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by John F » Tue Jun 18, 2019 2:52 pm

However excellent David Zinman may be, he isn't and never has been a "star conductor," which you said is what the orchestra needs. My point is that the orchestra did well under Zinman even though he's not a star conductor, and likewise under Zinman's predecessor Sergiu Comissiona. It's only when they somehow induced a bona fide star conductor, Yuri Temirkanov, to be their music director that their financial troubles began - not least because of bad box office, at least at the concerts I attended in Baltimore.

As for Temirkanov, he conducted an excellent Brahms 4th symphony in Baltimore and also with the New York Philharmonic, and his concerto partnerships in Baltimore with Lang Lang and Kissin were very fine, I thought. He developed a Russian sound in the orchestra, partly by adding an 8th double bass in all repertoire after the 18th century. That sound, and the extra double bass, went away when he did.

No Brahms 4 on YouTube, but here, of all things, is a lovely "Barber of Seville" overture, with expressive rubato in the opening pages and subtle dynamic shading throughout.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlrqdMXM0u0

Another of Temirkanov's virtues is that he could bring out the best in the orchestras he conducted. This was certainly evident in Baltimore, but he also conducted the student orchestra of the Manhattan College of Music in a reading of Shostakovich 10, the first two movements, and while their playing was merely competent when he began, he soon had them playing brilliantly, notably in the scherzo. They were helped by a few ringers from the St. Petersburg Philharmonic which was giving concerts with Temirkanov at Carnegie Hall, notably the concertmaster, but nearly all of them were Manhattan College students.

Unfortunately that wasn't filmed, or if it was then the film hasn't circulated. But here's Temirkanov conducting another orchestra of young musicians at the Verbier Festival in the finale of Shostakovich 10:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGM52pSteyY

It depresses me, though perhaps it doesn't surprise me, that Baltimore's music lovers wouldn't support this kind of music-making by their own orchestra. Perhaps Baltimore today doesn't deserve to have their own orchestra.
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Re: Baltimore Symphony Musicians Are ‘Stunned’ After Concerts Are Canceled

Post by Rach3 » Sun Jun 23, 2019 11:41 am

Does not appear getting closer to a resolution:

https://slippedisc.com/2019/06/baltimor ... ity-cover/

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