Spectator on Don Carlo

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barney
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Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by barney » Fri Aug 07, 2020 7:11 pm

This article is by Michael Tanner, the veteran opera critic of the Spectator. It is a lovely and quite short read, and the reference to Jon Vickers made me laugh out loud.



Michael Tanner chooses his favourite recordings of Verdi’s magnificent muddle

From magazine issue: 8 August 2020

Why imperfect operas like Don Carlo are more interesting than perfect ones

In the 62 years since I first heard and saw Don Carlo, in the famous and long-lasting production by Visconti at the Royal Opera, my feelings about it have grown ever stronger, both in passionate attachment and in critique. Imperfect operas, like other imperfect phenomena, can be more interesting than perfect ones, because they’re more thought-provoking, more enticing.

The libretto, very freely based on Schiller’s play, was by two Frenchmen, and Verdi, eager to make a bigger splash than he had so far in Paris, made too much of one. The first performance, in 1867, ran so late that the members who lived outside central Paris missed their last trains, which were at 12.35 a.m. (Royal Opera and ENO: please take note).

Verdi returned to Italy, and the opera seems to have been ignored — apart from oddly cut performances — until 1884. Given how great much of it is, and how much effort had gone into it, that is astounding. In 1884 Verdi revised it, cut the whole of Act I and lots more besides, and it was successfully staged at La Scala.

That was by no means the end of his messing around, and so there are four versions, though each is still subject to extensive tinkering. Perhaps the most remarkable thing in its tortured history is that in 1970 Andrew Porter, the great English critic, discovered in the library of the Opéra the score of the first performance, with many pages stuck together. Porter slowly and painfully unglued them, and copied out what he found, which was a great deal. What had always been a problematic work became radically unwieldy, though he found some marvellous music, some of which is now regularly included.

All that should make Don Carlo an ideal opera for recording, where it doesn’t matter how long a piece is. Partly, perhaps, because the composer tinkered with it so often and for so long, and partly because some of the music is evidently feeble, and above all because Verdi never seems to have got to grips with what he really felt the opera is about, it is no good trying to make it into a coherent work.

In the original version of the opera, Verdi sets out a strong social and political tone at the start of Act I. Then Don Carlo, unrecognised, turns up and he and Princess Elisabeth fall in love at the speed known only to operatic characters. Subsequently a messenger comes to tell them that Philip II, Carlo’s father, has decided he will marry Elisabeth, and the act ends in the lovers’ despair.

When Verdi took the drastic step of simply eliminating that Act, he inserted Carlo’s aria into the former Act II, where it has no business. The trouble remains that there are too many characters in the work, and their relationships are so complicated that there has to be lots of music, and some strange lacunae, to cope with them all. Despite which, there are many wonderful passages, and the last act, in which Elisabeth sings Verdi’s greatest aria and then she and Carlo have a chain of farewell duets, is sublime.

What is amazing is that Don Carlo has fared so well on record, and especially on DVD, though with so many roles there is always at least one disappointment. It is still possible to hear that 1958 performance, if in dim sound, with Gobbi, Christoff, Brouwenstijn, and Jon Vickers as Carlo. The first notes I ever heard Vickers sing were ‘Fontainebleau’, conveying an astonishing amount in that word: Carlo is unhinged, and since everything Vickers sang was a mad scene, he was ideal.

Many recordings followed, with Giulini’s on EMI still estimable, though with many little cuts. Abbado, a great advocate of the opera, made the only commercial recording in French, but it is a lacklustre affair despite its distinguished cast. Karajan recorded it to uniformly grim effect, and dispensing with Act I. There’s a DVD of the production from Salzburg too, with superb singers, but it’s more depressing than moving.

Otherwise DVDs are the way to go, with an astonishing number of excellent performances. Only one contains the ballet music (Verdi was anxious to avoid Wagner’s fate, when in 1861 Tannhäuser was booed off the stage for having the ballet music in the wrong place). This version is directed by Peter Konwitschny, but is less wacky than he usually is, and with an all-round decent cast.

Two DVDs from Covent Garden, both conducted by Pappano, are largely excellent: one primarily for the Rodrigo of Simon Keenlyside, the role he was born to sing and act, though the other males are rusty. The other stars Jonas Kaufmann, who croons in the final duet, and Anja Harteros, fine as Elisabeth.

The most satisfying performance by far — also conducted by Pappano, in 1996 — is in French, from the Châtelet, with Roberto Alagna in stupendous voice, and identifying with the title role to an almost uncanny extent. The cast is strong, though Thomas Hampson as Rodrigo seems to have borrowed a wig from Susan Sontag, and makes a bland impression. The final scene — French makes a big difference, though I’d be hard put to say why — is the most moving I have ever seen or heard.

maestrob
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by maestrob » Sat Aug 08, 2020 10:26 am

Agree about the Vickers comment, and also got a laugh out of the comment about Thomas Hampson's wig: priceless! :lol:

In every brief summary, there are missing details. Most notably, the MET used the version of the opera with the first act totally removed for decades. That version is still published by Schirmer in piano reduction. Under Levine, the MET revived the five-act Italian version: although longer, I think it is more dramatically effective, but of course, still no ballet. Ricordi publishes that score in piano reduction still. La Selva IIRC led the American premiere of Don Carlos, the published version in French, as part of his presentation of all the fully-staged Verdi operas back in the 1980's, to much acclaim, celebrating Verdi's centennial, the only conductor in the world to do so (He was knighted by the Italian government for his achievement.). La Selva's series culminated in a performance of Verdi's great Requiem in Carnegie Hall on the centennial date of Verdi's funeral.

Don Carlo is one of Verdi's great works, IMHO, in spite of its tortured history. Among aother versions, I do have the Alagna DVD, and consider it a great performance despite its inordinate length.

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diegobueno
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by diegobueno » Sat Aug 08, 2020 11:42 am

Don Carlo has always been my favorite Verdi opera, fascinating as well as frustrating for its convoluted plot and multiple versions. As an undergrad I got to know it through the recording with Placido Domingo and Sherill Milnes and Shirley Verett and Gilulini conducting. In those days I made it a habit to go to the music library every day, find the score of whatever I wanted to listen to, check out a recording and sit at a turntable and get engrossed in it. With Don Carlo I wanted to be sure to find a score that had the Fontainebleu scene in it, and there was only one edition that did. It had the disadvantage of being in French only, and I noticed as the opera went on that I kept getting lost because at certain points the recording would do something completely different than what was printed on the page. Sure enough, they had an original 1869 edition of the piano score just sitting on the shelves for anyone to look at.

I spent some time studying that score to discover what Verdi's first thoughts were. I have to say his revision has so much more power. For instance after Don Carlo and Rodrigo react to seeing the mystery monk, there's a descending chromatic scale in the bassoon. In the original version, the music just stops at the bassoon's lowest note, and there's some recitative before the great friendship duet. In the revision Verdi keeps the music driving forward and their dialog is embedded in continuously developing music. Some time before I graduated I tried to find that score again. It had been moved to locked press and one could only peruse it at a special table that was under the watchful eye of the librarian. It was like after years and years suddenly someone at the library had realized they had something really valuable in their collections.
Black lives matter.

barney
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by barney » Sat Aug 08, 2020 11:54 am

Brian, I agree. My favourite Verdi is whatever I am listening to now, but Don Carlo is consistently up there with Otello and a couple of others. I too prefer the five-act Italian version,but don't regard the ballet music as any particular loss. The scene between Philip and the Grand Inquisitor is one of the most chilling in all opera, with indescribably great music. In fact that act would be one of my top 10 individual acts.

I have seven complete accounts:

Solti, Covent Garden with Bergonzi, Ghiaurov, Tebaldi, Brumbry etc


Von Karajan and the VPO with Siepe, Fernandi, Jurinac, Bastianini, Simionato


Muti and La Scala with Pavarotti, Dessi, d'Intino, Ramey


Von Karajan and the VPO again with Freni, Carreras, Cappuccilli, Cossotto, Ghiaurov, van Dam, Gruberova and Tomowa-Sintow - particularly star-studded.


Abbado and La Scala with Domingo, Ann Murray, Ricciarelli, Raffalli, Nucci, Valentini Terrani, Raimondi, Ghiaurov and Auger - equally star-studded.


Giulini and Covent Garden forces including Domingo, Delia Wallis, Caballe, Davies, Estes, Milnes, Verrett, Raimondi


Klobucar with the VPO, Domingo, Ghiaurov, Hotter, Gwyneth Jones, Ludwig mezzo, Lotte Rysanek

maestrob
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by maestrob » Sat Aug 08, 2020 12:01 pm

Yes, Mark, I agree that the Ricordi Italian edition is much more powerful than the original French version, which can tend to drag here and there. When the MET switched to that version, performances were longer, of course, but much more satisfying. I remember we saw Placido Domingo and Mirella Freni during the 1980's with Levine conducting: it was one of their finest performances.

As usual, Barney, I envy your more extensive concert experience. :)

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lennygoran
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by lennygoran » Sat Aug 08, 2020 4:10 pm

barney wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 7:11 pm
Why imperfect operas like Don Carlo are more interesting than perfect ones
Barney thanks for the article-we were out gallivanting again today and I'm just reading it now--no matter what he says I consider it one of Verdi's best opera-the Met production is imo superb. Regards, Len

barney
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by barney » Sat Aug 08, 2020 5:50 pm

lennygoran wrote:
Sat Aug 08, 2020 4:10 pm
barney wrote:
Fri Aug 07, 2020 7:11 pm
Why imperfect operas like Don Carlo are more interesting than perfect ones
Barney thanks for the article-we were out gallivanting again today and I'm just reading it now--no matter what he says I consider it one of Verdi's best opera-the Met production is imo superb. Regards, Len
That's a red-hot cast, Len. I saw Furlanetto sing Philip here two or three years ago. He was so good I went out and bought a ticket to another performance. I always find Philip the most interesting character, along with Eboli.

barney
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by barney » Sat Aug 08, 2020 5:51 pm

Oops, not Len, Brian. But you may be referring to the same production.

lennygoran
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by lennygoran » Sun Aug 09, 2020 7:28 am

barney wrote:
Sat Aug 08, 2020 5:50 pm
I saw Furlanetto sing Philip here two or three years ago.
Barney we saw him do it at the Met-very good! We also saw Nicolai Ghiaurov-superb-they used to say he owned that role if I remember correctly? Yesterday while cooking in the kitchen I turned on youtube on the TV with the roku--started watching as I went back and forth from the kitchen to the dining room table getting dinner ready-almost got completely hooked by this Don Carlo. Regards, Len

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXa45Xx_H9Q
DON CARLO - Caballe, Aragall, Bumbry, Bruson, Estes - Orange, 1984 - English subtitles

Theatre Antique d'Orange, 13 July 1984. English subtitles.
Caballe was amazing Elisabetta di Valois in her Don Carlo recordings from 1960-70s. This performance, her only videotaped Don Carlo, is of a much later date, but she is still impressive here. Don Carlo is sung by another great, though less known singer - Catalonian tenor Jaume Aragall. Grace Bumbry, Renato Bruson and Simon Estes round up a great ensemble.

THEHORN
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by THEHORN » Wed Aug 12, 2020 3:21 pm

An interesting article, but it doesn't mention one of the best recordings of the opera, namely Solti, with Tebaldi , Bumbry, Bergonzi, Fischer-Dieskau , Ghiaurov and Talvela, a cast which would e hard o beat anywhere , any time .
And yes, Fischer-Dieskau was a much better Verdi baritone than most critics give him credit for being . He wasn't "idiomatic ", but I couldn't care less . According to one story, when he came to La Scala to sing Rigoletto in the 60s with Kubelik conducting, which resulted in a classic recording, a bellhop at the hotel in Milan where he was staying and who was a big opera fan, told him he was "the greatest Rigoletto he had ever heard !

Handelian
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by Handelian » Sun Nov 01, 2020 3:54 am

THEHORN wrote:
Wed Aug 12, 2020 3:21 pm
An interesting article, but it doesn't mention one of the best recordings of the opera, namely Solti, with Tebaldi , Bumbry, Bergonzi, Fischer-Dieskau , Ghiaurov and Talvela, a cast which would e hard o beat anywhere , any time .
And yes, Fischer-Dieskau was a much better Verdi baritone than most critics give him credit for being . He wasn't "idiomatic ", but I couldn't care less . According to one story, when he came to La Scala to sing Rigoletto in the 60s with Kubelik conducting, which resulted in a classic recording, a bellhop at the hotel in Milan where he was staying and who was a big opera fan, told him he was "the greatest Rigoletto he had ever heard !
In all fairness, the bellhop, mindful of a singer’s ego and a tip, might have told every singer who stayed there they were ‘the greatest.’

barney
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by barney » Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:30 am

:lol:What a cynic you are, Handelian. You'll be right at home here!

Handelian
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by Handelian » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:06 am

barney wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:30 am
:lol:What a cynic you are, Handelian. You'll be right at home here!
I have the recording of Rigoletto with Kubelik conducting and I wouldn’t call it a classic by any means

Handelian
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by Handelian » Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:08 am

Handelian wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:06 am
barney wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:30 am
:lol:What a cynic you are, Handelian. You'll be right at home here!
I have the recording of Rigoletto with Kubelik conducting and I wouldn’t call it a classic by any means
I have the Kubelik Rigoletto and wouldn’t exactly call it ‘classic’. Interesting maybe

maestrob
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by maestrob » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:15 am

Handelian wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:08 am
Handelian wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:06 am
barney wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:30 am
:lol:What a cynic you are, Handelian. You'll be right at home here!
I have the recording of Rigoletto with Kubelik conducting and I wouldn’t call it a classic by any means
I have the Kubelik Rigoletto and wouldn’t exactly call it ‘classic’. Interesting maybe
Yes, hardly! 😉

I grew up with Anna Moffo's glorious Gilda, paired with Merrill's Rigoletto and Alfredo Kraus's Duke, led by Solti. Moffo graduated from my high school in 1952 (I used to have my shoes resoled at her father's shoe repair shop, which was right next to where I went to middle school in Wayne, PA.) and sang at my middle school graduation, so I'd been in love with her ever since and collected everything she recorded. Robert Merrill later became a client when I was running the men's clothing store at the New York Athletic Club during the 1980's, and we played his recordings often. (Small world!) Not the most profound Rigoletto, but what a magnificent sound issued from that throat! Thankfully, Sony has finally gotten around to reissuing the CD. Here's the new cover:

Image

Fischer-Dieskau recorded most everything written for baritone, including of course Wotan for HvK, but I always felt that he was most at home in lieder, where his sensitivity and nuance could be fully expressed.

Handelian
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by Handelian » Sun Nov 01, 2020 3:29 pm

maestrob wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:15 am
Handelian wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:08 am
Handelian wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 9:06 am
barney wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:30 am
:lol:What a cynic you are, Handelian. You'll be right at home here!
I have the recording of Rigoletto with Kubelik conducting and I wouldn’t call it a classic by any means
I have the Kubelik Rigoletto and wouldn’t exactly call it ‘classic’. Interesting maybe
Yes, hardly! 😉

I grew up with Anna Moffo's glorious Gilda, paired with Merrill's Rigoletto and Alfredo Kraus's Duke, led by Solti. Moffo graduated from my high school in 1952 (I used to have my shoes resoled at her father's shoe repair shop, which was right next to where I went to middle school in Wayne, PA.) and sang at my middle school graduation, so I'd been in love with her ever since and collected everything she recorded. Robert Merrill later became a client when I was running the men's clothing store at the New York Athletic Club during the 1980's, and we played his recordings often. (Small world!) Not the most profound Rigoletto, but what a magnificent sound issued from that throat! Thankfully, Sony has finally gotten around to reissuing the CD. Here's the new cover:

Image

Fischer-Dieskau recorded most everything written for baritone, including of course Wotan for HvK, but I always felt that he was most at home in lieder, where his sensitivity and nuance could be fully expressed.
That Rigoletto was the first complete opera recording I ever bought when a lad at a time when LPs were very expensive. The two LPs cost £4 which was a lot as I only earned less than half that a week! Amazingly well produced set with lovely book. Loved it. Moffo's Gilda is certainly one of the best as are the Duke and Rigoletto himself. Solti drives the music too hard at times though but for excitement he cannot be beaten. I have it on CD for old time's sake and much else. It is still one of the best. Pity Moffo overworked and wrecked her voice. I have her Carmen somewhere with Corelli.

maestrob
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by maestrob » Sun Nov 01, 2020 3:47 pm

Frankly, I never bought that Carmen because of Corelli's really awful French! Same with his Faust with Sutherland. Couldn't stand to listen to it! :mrgreen:

Handelian
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by Handelian » Sun Nov 01, 2020 4:28 pm

maestrob wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 3:47 pm
Frankly, I never bought that Carmen because of Corelli's really awful French! Same with his Faust with Sutherland. Couldn't stand to listen to it! :mrgreen:
I know the French is not spoken in France but dig the voice!

maestrob
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by maestrob » Mon Nov 02, 2020 8:57 am

Handelian wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 4:28 pm
maestrob wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 3:47 pm
Frankly, I never bought that Carmen because of Corelli's really awful French! Same with his Faust with Sutherland. Couldn't stand to listen to it! :mrgreen:
I know the French is not spoken in France but dig the voice!
Corelli was absolutely great in Italian opera: no question! But, IMHO, his sound was simply not suited for French opera. I much prefer Domingo's Romeo with Ruth Ann Swenson to Corelli with Mirella Freni, and Swenson sings the Poison Aria, which was a standard cut when Freni recorded the role.

In the 1980's, I had a tenor friend who took lessons with Corelli. Franco taught by singing a note and saying: "Imitate this!" Well, after a while, that became frustrating, since Corelli really was self-taught and had no teachable technique, so my tenor friend, proud as he was to study with a great (and expensive!) singer, took his leave. Franco didn't have a busy studio, but his wife, Loretta, did. In fact, she was under observation by the IRS and, since she demanded cash payment from her students, she insisted that they come and go by a side door to their building on 57th Street in Manhattan!

Another mezzo friend who had a voice that was perfect for Carmen or Charlotte, was referred to Loretta by her agent at Columbia Artists, who promptly took her off the market while she retrained to be a soprano. Loretta took her on a study tour to Italy one summer, and worked with her for several years, milking my friend (who had premiered Mrs. Ghandi in Satyagraha for Phillip Glass here in NY) of both her and her mother's life savings, all to no avail! Loretta, it soon appeared was a a domineering charlatan as a voice teacher, and my friend never recovered her career! Very sad. :shock:

I also remember that Franco suffered from terrible stage fright, and many times had to be shoved out onto the stage because he simply couldn't move by himself. Once he was in front of an audience, he was glorious, but a tortured man backstage, sadly.

Those were the days!

Handelian
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by Handelian » Mon Nov 02, 2020 9:49 am

maestrob wrote:
Mon Nov 02, 2020 8:57 am
Handelian wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 4:28 pm
maestrob wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 3:47 pm
Frankly, I never bought that Carmen because of Corelli's really awful French! Same with his Faust with Sutherland. Couldn't stand to listen to it! :mrgreen:
I know the French is not spoken in France but dig the voice!
Corelli was absolutely great in Italian opera: no question! But, IMHO, his sound was simply not suited for French opera. I much prefer Domingo's Romeo with Ruth Ann Swenson to Corelli with Mirella Freni, and Swenson sings the Poison Aria, which was a standard cut when Freni recorded the role.

In the 1980's, I had a tenor friend who took lessons with Corelli. Franco taught by singing a note and saying: "Imitate this!" Well, after a while, that became frustrating, since Corelli really was self-taught and had no teachable technique, so my tenor friend, proud as he was to study with a great (and expensive!) singer, took his leave. Franco didn't have a busy studio, but his wife, Loretta, did. In fact, she was under observation by the IRS and, since she demanded cash payment from her students, she insisted that they come and go by a side door to their building on 57th Street in Manhattan!

Another mezzo friend who had a voice that was perfect for Carmen or Charlotte, was referred to Loretta by her agent at Columbia Artists, who promptly took her off the market while she retrained to be a soprano. Loretta took her on a study tour to Italy one summer, and worked with her for several years, milking my friend (who had premiered Mrs. Ghandi in Satyagraha for Phillip Glass here in NY) of both her and her mother's life savings, all to no avail! Loretta, it soon appeared was a a domineering charlatan as a voice teacher, and my friend never recovered her career! Very sad. :shock:

I also remember that Franco suffered from terrible stage fright, and many times had to be shoved out onto the stage because he simply couldn't move by himself. Once he was in front of an audience, he was glorious, but a tortured man backstage, sadly.

Those were the days!
John Culshaw gives some very amusing recollections of Corelli and the fearsome Loretta in 'Putting the Record Straight.' When they were recording Carmen with Karajan, RCA hired a French coach to improve Corelli's French. Unfortunately the coach was female so Loretta wouldn't let Corelli near her. So it was a complete waste of money. However, at the end Loretta demanded an extra $1000 for the extra French lessons Corelli never had! And wouldn't let him sing the Flower Song until RCA paid up. Quite a woman, holding a multi-national corporation to ransom with 'Ma Franco'!
I know Schoenberg tells a story of Franco having a row with a baritone and refusing to sing with him again. Sadly the baritone was sacked because although baritones were plentiful there was only one Corelli.

barney
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Re: Spectator on Don Carlo

Post by barney » Mon Nov 02, 2020 4:57 pm

Fascinating anecdotes. Thanks both of you.

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