Today's Nose

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lennygoran
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Today's Nose

Post by lennygoran » Sun Mar 28, 2021 3:46 pm

A rainy soggy day-we decided to use the Met's On Demand for The Nose-we had seen it live but to be honest I think we got more out of it sitting at home using the big TV-an incredible Kentridge production and Szot was just outstanding-funny we had recently seen him via Netflix in Weil's Street Scene. A very large cast and they sure knew how to bring it off! Regards, Len

Shostakovich
The Nose

Acclaimed artist William Kentridge directed and designed this visually dazzling Met premiere production of Shostakovich’s satirical opera, adapted from the classic short story by Nikolai Gogol. Baritone Paulo Szot leads the cast as Kovalyov, the hapless bureaucrat whose nose has mysteriously gone missing. Alexander Lewis and Andrey Popov co-star, and Pavel Smelkov conducts.


Performance Date Oct 26, 2013

Metropolitan Opera House
October 26, 2013 Matinee

HD Transmission

THE NOSE {13}
Dmitri Shostakovich-YevgenyZamy/Georgy Ionin/Alexander Preis/Nikolai Gogol

Kovalyov...................Paulo Szot
Police Inspector...........Andrey Popov
The Nose...................Alexander Lewis


Act I
INTRODUCTION

Scene 1 THE SHOP OF THE BARBER YAKOVLEVICH
Ivan Yakovlevich...........Vladimir Ognovenko

Scene 2 THE HOME OF BARBER YAKOVLEVICH AND HIS WIFE
Ivan Yakovlevich...........Vladimir Ognovenko
Praskovya Osipovna.........Claudia Waite

Scene 3 ON THE EMBANKMENT
Constable..................Grigory Soloviov
Ivan Yakovlevich...........Vladimir Ognovenko

Scene 4 INTERLUDE

Scene 5 IN KOVALYOV'S BEDROOM
Ivan, Kovalyov's Servant...Sergei Skorokhodov

Scene 6 GALLOP

Scene 7 KAZAN CATHEDRAL
Female Voice...............Ying Fang
Male Voice.................Tony Stevenson
Footman....................Brian Kontes


Act II
INTRODUCTION

Scene 1 OUTSIDE THE POLICE OFFICE
Porter.....................Sergei Skorokhodov
A Cabby....................Gennady Bezzubenkov

Scene 2 THE NEWSPAPER OFFICE
Newspaper Clerk..........James Courtney
Countess's Footman.......Ricardo Lugo
Caretakers: Brian Kontes, Kevin Burdette, Matt Boehler, Joseph Barron, Grigory Soloviov, Philip Cokorinos, Kevin Glavin, Christopher Job

Scene 3 ENTR'ACTE

Scene 4 KOVALYOV'S APARTMENT
Ivan.......................Sergei Skorokhodov


Act III

Scene 1 THE OUTSKIRTS OF ST. PETERSBURG
Policemen: Brian Kontes, Sergei Skorokhodov, Kevin Burdette, Matt Boehler, Michael Myers, Joseph Barron, Brian Frutiger, Tony Stevenson, Jeffrey Behrens, Grigory Soloviov
Father.....................Philip Cokorinos
Mother.....................Maria Gavrilova
Sons.......................Michael Forest, Christopher Job
Pyotr Fedorovitch..........Todd Wilander
Ivan Ivanovitch............Ricardo Lugo
Matron.....................Theodora Hanslowe
Pretzel Vendor.............Claudia Waite
Coachman...................Kevin Glavin

Scene 2 THE DRAWING ROOMS OF KOVALYOV AND MADAME PODTOCHINA
Ivan.......................Sergei Skorokhodov
Doctor.....................Gennady Bezzubenkov
Yaryzhkin..................Adam Klein
Podtochina's daughter......Ying Fang
Mme. Podtochina............Barbara Dever

Scene 3 INTERMEZZO
Gentlemen: Sergei Skorokhodov, Michael Myers, Brian Frutiger, Brian Kontes, Kevin Burdette, Joseph Barron, Tony Stevenson
Old Man....................Jeffrey Behrens
Newcomers..................Grigory Soloviov, Michael Forest
Black Marketeer............Matt Boehler
Distinguished Colonel......Todd Wilander
Dandys.....................Philip Cokorinos, Michael Myers
Someone....................Kevin Glavin
Students: Sergei Skorokhodov, Brian Frutiger, Joseph Barron, Christopher Job, Tony Stevenson, Jeffrey Behrens, Todd Wilander, Ricardo Lugo
Respectable Lady...........Kathryn Day
Lady's Sons................Kevin Burdette, Matthew Boehler
Khosrev-mirza..............Vladimir Ognovenko

Scene 4 KOVALYOV'S APARTMENT
Ivan, Kovalyov's Servant...Sergei Skorokhodov
Ivan Yakovlevich...........Vladimir Ognovenko

Scene 5 THE NEVSKY PROSPECT
Kovalyov's Acquaintances: Brian Kontes, Michael Myers, Kevin Burdette
Mme. Podtochina............Barbara Dever
Podtochina's daughter......Ying Fang

Acting Ensemble: Snezhana Chernova, Frank Colardo, Svetlana Kifa, Stass Klassen, Vadim Krol, Alexander Merinov, Erik Parillo, Dan Renkin, Dina Rose Rivera, Inna Yesilevskaya

Conductor..................Pavel Smelkov

Production.................William Kentridge
Stage Director.............William Kentridge
Stage Director.............Luc De Wit
Set Designer...............William Kentridge
Set Designer...............Sabine Theunissen
Costume Designer...........Greta Goiris
Lighting Designer..........Urs Schönebaum
TV Director.............Gary Halvorson


This afternoon's performance is transmitted live in high definition to movie theaters worldwide

The Met: Live in HD series is made possible by a generous grant from the founding sponsor, The Neubauer Family Foundation
Bloomberg is the global corporate sponsor of The Met: Live in HD

Taped for later telecast
Met Opera on demand streaming

The Nose is a co-production of the Metropolitan Opera, the Festival d'Aix-en-Provence, and the Opéra National de Lyon, France.

barney
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Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:12 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Today's Nose

Post by barney » Sun Mar 28, 2021 5:04 pm

A really fun opera. I loved the joint Royal Opera House-Opera Australia production by Barrie Koskie.
Have a look at the noses' tap dance -3.5 minutes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YotMwwixPsw

Modernistfan
Posts: 2003
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2004 5:23 pm

Re: Today's Nose

Post by Modernistfan » Sun Mar 28, 2021 7:50 pm

I would love to see this--maybe I should sign up for this service. Unfortunately, there is no chance of this work being staged in San Diego (they won't even perform Richard Strauss's Salome or Electra). Maybe they might perform it in Los Angeles. (I love Kentridge's art.)

barney
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Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:12 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Today's Nose

Post by barney » Mon Mar 29, 2021 6:13 am

Modernistfan wrote:
Sun Mar 28, 2021 7:50 pm
I would love to see this--maybe I should sign up for this service. Unfortunately, there is no chance of this work being staged in San Diego (they won't even perform Richard Strauss's Salome or Electra). Maybe they might perform it in Los Angeles. (I love Kentridge's art.)
His Met Lulu was brilliant.

lennygoran
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Location: new york city

Re: Today's Nose

Post by lennygoran » Mon Mar 29, 2021 6:56 am

barney wrote:
Sun Mar 28, 2021 5:04 pm
Have a look at the noses' tap dance -3.5 minutes
Barney I did-where's the music-so far what I've seen of Kosky doesn't impress me. I was at his Magic Flute for Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival when it presented a staging inspired by animated film and the style of Weimar Berlin-so far for me he tampers too much with what I want from my operas. Regards, Len :(

Tommasini saw it differently-to each his own. Regards, Len


Review: In ‘The Magic Flute,’ Mozart Meets Nosferatu

Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival presents a staging inspired by animated film and the style of Weimar Berlin.



By Anthony Tommasini
July 18, 2019



For all its familiarity, Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” has always been a tough opera for directors to crack. It’s not just a fairy tale, but also a poignant love story, a farcical comedy, a magic show, and an affecting portrait of a spiritual journey — all at once.

How do you balance these elements? The director Barrie Kosky’s answer is to not even try. Instead, in the production he created with the director and writer Suzanne Andrade and the animator Paul Barritt for the Komische Oper in Berlin in 2012, he embraced the work’s myriad styles and contradictions, its messy mix of fantasy, profundity and silliness.

This well-traveled production had its New York premiere on Wednesday at the David H. Koch Theater, presented by the Mostly Mozart Festival. It features winning singers — the five main roles are double-cast for the four-performance run, through Saturday — members of the Komische Oper chorus and the Tölz Boys’ Choir of Munich. The conductor Louis Langrée draws a lithe, articulate and elegant performance from the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra.

Though the production celebrates the opera’s variety, it does have a unified stylistic milieu: Berlin in the 1920s. Indeed, Ms. Andrade and Mr. Barritt call their production company 1927, in homage to that rich period for cabaret, music hall and silent film. I had reservations about the busy animated images, which sometimes overwhelm the singers. Still, the sheer inventiveness of the staging, its fantastical mix of animation and live action, is hard to resist.

What the audience is in for comes through in the opening scene, a tour de force. The set is essentially a rectangular wall, like a film screen, through which characters often pop out when a high or low door opens and a rotating platform swirls around.
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We see the prince Tamino (the stirring lyric tenor Julien Behr), a handsome young man in a trim black suit and slightly surreal pasty-white makeup. He is running frantically, fleeing a monstrous serpent. With his upper body, Mr. Behr pumps his arms and looks breathless. But his impossibly fast-moving legs are depicted by an animated film projected on the wall he’s standing behind, an image right out of silent-movie slapstick.

As he runs, we see him passing past animated bushes, trees and hills, all the while encircled by the reddish serpent, its mouth agape. When the Three Ladies come to his rescue, they look like habitués of a Berlin cafe, with fur-trimmed coats, stylish hats and cigarette holders.


Mozart’s opera is a singspiel, with stretches of spoken dialogue — not unlike a classic musical. So it’s often awkward to present the work as written to non-German audiences; the dialogue just doesn’t come off as direct and understandable.

This production has an inspired solution. As in a silent film, the characters’ words go unspoken but are projected as intertitles in English on a black screen, while music from two moody Mozart keyboard pieces (the fantasies in D minor and C minor) is played, by Frank Schulte, on fortepiano. It’s touching yet ominous when poor Tamino wakes up looking lost and lonely, and asks — or so the intertitle says — “Where am I?” as Mozart’s mysterious music plays.

The production keeps on boldly mixing madcap animated film with a deep dive into the opera’s philosophical issues. The bird catcher Papageno (the hearty baritone Rodion Pogossov, in an endearing performance) has the look of Buster Keaton, with a floppy cap and a frumpy forest-green suit. Pamina, with whom Tamino falls in love, is here a Louise Brooks lookalike (the radiant soprano Maureen McKay, in a standout performance).


Her mother, the Queen of the Night (the brilliant soprano Audrey Luna, renowned for her effortless stratospheric high notes), who sings from a platform high up on the wall, is portrayed as a terrifying spider-like creature with tentacles that can ensnare anyone. Why doesn’t the lovely Pamina look like her mother? The production invites you to put aside such questions and go with the metaphorical imagery. Besides, you can imagine this Queen actually manipulating a contraption of her own design.

Sarastro (the solid bass Dimitry Ivashchenko) is a somewhat stiff, bearded gentleman in a top hat who looks like a member of a Berlin scientific society. Along with truth, work and art, science is at the forefront of the brotherhood he heads. Whenever we are taken inside the Temple of Wisdom, a menagerie of mechanical animals strides by, including lightning bugs with propeller hats, who provide lanterns to guide visitors through their admission trials.

The production turns Monostatos (Johannes Dunz) — Sarastro’s slave, described as a Moor in the libretto — into a Nosferatu echo, which softens the tinge of racism toward the character in the libretto. But the directors do not mask the sexism of the story. The Speaker, who greets Tamino when he arrives at the temple, still admonishes him for his romantic folly. “Women do little but talk a lot,” he says.

On the other hand, Mozart’s opera does show Tamino needing Pamina as they undergo the trials of fire and water together. In this production the fire monster is a huge, menacing mechanical creature, easily disarmed by the sounds of the magic flute and the power of young love.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/18/arts ... enter.html

lennygoran
Posts: 16773
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Today's Nose

Post by lennygoran » Mon Mar 29, 2021 7:03 am

barney wrote:
Mon Mar 29, 2021 6:13 am
His Met Lulu was brilliant.
Barney we saw that one live at the Met too and his production was very nice-fortunately it too is available at the Met's On Demand site-video and audio both! Regards, Len

Image

William Kentridge’s multi-layered production of Berg’s masterpiece stars charismatic soprano Marlis Petersen in the title role—the enigmatic and alluring woman who is equal parts femme fatale, innocent girl, and abused victim. The men around her, whose lives she forever alters, are Johan Reuter as newspaper publisher Dr. Schön; Daniel Brenna as his composer son, Alwa; Paul Groves as the Painter; and Franz Grundheber as Schigolch. Susan Graham sings Countess Geschwitz, and Lothar Koenigs conducts Berg’s landmark score.

barney
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Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Today's Nose

Post by barney » Mon Mar 29, 2021 4:54 pm

Yes, the soprano was amazing in that Lulu.
Re the Nose, the tap dance is Kosky's addition. I agreed with you about the Magic Flute, but the Nose is an opera in which one can indulge oneself a bit more - as Gogol did. Kosky is very hit and miss for me because, like you, I am a traditionalist who sees no need to "update", but when he's hot he's very hot. And I thought he was in this production.

lennygoran
Posts: 16773
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:28 pm
Location: new york city

Re: Today's Nose

Post by lennygoran » Tue Mar 30, 2021 7:56 am

barney wrote:
Mon Mar 29, 2021 4:54 pm
Yes, the soprano was amazing in that Lulu.
Re the Nose, the tap dance is Kosky's addition. I agreed with you about the Magic Flute, but the Nose is an opera in which one can indulge oneself a bit more - as Gogol did. Kosky is very hit and miss for me because, like you, I am a traditionalist who sees no need to "update", but when he's hot he's very hot. And I thought he was in this production.
Barney haven't seen it but I'm concerned about interrupting the flow of the music just to do a tap dance-still I haven't seen it so I can't judge the whole work. It seemed most people liked his Magic flute but not us. Regards, Len

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