What are you listening to?

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

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karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Thu Aug 31, 2006 9:44 pm

Shostakovich
String Quartet No. 15 in E-flat Minor Opus 144
Borodin Qtet
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu Aug 31, 2006 9:49 pm

karlhenning wrote:Shostakovich
String Quartet No. 15 in E-flat Minor Opus 144
Borodin Qtet
You should get some kind of award, Karl - yours was the 1400th post to this thread.
Corlyss
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anasazi
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Post by anasazi » Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:28 am

Moussorgsky: "Pictures At An Exhibition", Byron Janis at the piano.
"Take only pictures, leave only footprints" - John Muir.

CharmNewton
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Post by CharmNewton » Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:47 am

premont wrote:
CharmNewton wrote:Girolamo Frescobaldi: Collection of Keyboard Works--Robert Woolley, Harpsichord (EMI CDC 7 47735 2)
An interesting collection of Frescobaldi's works, although it comes off a bit sounding like Byrd. I've been thinking getting one of the Vartolo's recordings on Naxos for comparison.
John
Like Byrd? Really, I never thought of that.
Vartolo is reliable, but extremely slow and meditative.
Especially the Canzoni need more life and energy.
The music struck me as being genteel in a British manner and I wondered how an Italian might play this muisc. The British style was brought home to me when I listened to Fabio Biondi play concerti of Vivaldi and followed them with the same works recorded by Hogwood. Biondi just bristled with passion whereas Hogwood sounded well-tailored and manicured.

John

Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Fri Sep 01, 2006 2:34 am

Some of Scarlatti's sonatas played by Scott Ross.

Suppé's Requiem conducted by Corboz, with the Gulbenkian Orchestra and Chorus.
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

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Post by karlhenning » Fri Sep 01, 2006 6:37 am

Corlyss_D wrote:
karlhenning wrote:Shostakovich
String Quartet No. 15 in E-flat Minor Opus 144
Borodin Qtet
You should get some kind of award, Karl - yours was the 1400th post to this thread.
:-)
Karl Henning, PhD
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premont
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Post by premont » Fri Sep 01, 2006 7:53 am

CharmNewton wrote: The music struck me as being genteel in a British manner and I wondered how an Italian might play this muisc. The British style was brought home to me when I listened to Fabio Biondi play concerti of Vivaldi and followed them with the same works recorded by Hogwood. Biondi just bristled with passion whereas Hogwood sounded well-tailored and manicured.
John
I understand what you mean. As I wrote above, Vartolo is very slow and introvert, and not typical "Italian" in his interpretation. A better choice is Rinaldo Alessandrini, but his recordings are few and difficult to find. A reasonable alternative is Pierre Hantäi´s recording on Naive, even if he is French.

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Post by Gary » Fri Sep 01, 2006 5:22 pm

Christoph wrote:Some of Scarlatti's sonatas played by Scott Ross.

Suppé's Requiem conducted by Corboz, with the Gulbenkian Orchestra and Chorus.
Welcome, Christoph.

Suppé wrote a requiem? Interesting.
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

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Post by jserraglio » Fri Sep 01, 2006 6:49 pm

Image

anasazi
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Post by anasazi » Sat Sep 02, 2006 12:46 am

Always been a Van Cliburn fan. I know that RCA marketed this pianist's recordings the best they could, considering that he did not like to record.

But I just finished most of Cliburn's My Favorite Brahms. I had to stop at the end of Op. 118 #6.

This is simply a remarkable performance. It has a 'live' feeling, but it is not. And at first, considering the other recordings I have heard, I even dug out my Schirmer edition of Brahms to verify. Cliburn stays to the straight and narrow, but still somehow makes this piece all the more remarkable. If you love late Brahms piano, get this disc.

And despite these being 30 year old recordings, I've seldom heard a piano sound better on CD.
"Take only pictures, leave only footprints" - John Muir.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Sep 02, 2006 1:06 am

Christoph wrote:Hi guys,

I am new to this forum. At the moment I am listening to Sventurata Didone by Francesco Bartolomeo Conti (1682-1732). Its played by Neue Hofmusikkapelle München, a rather new period instrument ensemble.
Mmmmm. A man after my own heart. Welcome to the forum, Christoph. Pull up a chair and dig dig dig right in. Post early and often.
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Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Sat Sep 02, 2006 5:14 am

Gary wrote:
Christoph wrote:Some of Scarlatti's sonatas played by Scott Ross.

Suppé's Requiem conducted by Corboz, with the Gulbenkian Orchestra and Chorus.
Welcome, Christoph.

Suppé wrote a requiem? Interesting.
Thank you, Gary.

Suppé composed the requiem in memory of Franz Pokorny, who engaged the young Suppé first as singer and then as conductor. The Requiem was first performed in 1855 and was very successful.

But it dropped out of the repertoire and was thought to be lost. I think it was only rediscovered a few years ago. As far as I know Corboz' recording is the only one available.
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 02, 2006 8:23 am

Image

Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Sat Sep 02, 2006 8:49 am

Schumann: Märchenbilder with Martha Argerich and Nobuko Imai

Couperin: Quatrieme Concert of the "Concerts Royaux", Les Concerts des Nations, Savall :D
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

mourningstar
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Post by mourningstar » Sat Sep 02, 2006 9:39 am

le cygne - Camille Saint-Saens (for the Cello)

And Bach - Sarabande (also for cello)
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jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 02, 2006 11:33 am

listening to some high-quality free MP3s from IPA, Maryland
______________________________________________

Bach, Prelude and Fugue F sharp major, Fischer
Beethoven, Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Minuet, Schnabel
Beethoven-Busoni, Ecossaises, Busoni
Brahms, Intermezzo in C, Hess
Chopin, Black Key Etude, Jeanne-Marie Darre
Chopin, Etude In F Minor, Sauer
Chopin, Mazurka Op. 67 no 1 in G, Rosenthal
Chopin, Mazurka. Op. 67 No. 3 In C, Friedman
Chopin, Prélude Piano no 17, Cortot
Chopin, Tarantelle In A Flat, Dorfmann
Chopin, Waltz for piano, Lipatti
Chopin-Liszt, Chant Polonaise 'Maiden's Wish', Hofmann
Couperin, Le Carillon de Cythere, Paderewski
Debussy, Arabesque No. 2 in G Major, Scharrer
Grieg, Puck - Lyric Pieces, de Greef
Liszt, Gnomenreigen, Petri
Liszt, Transcendental Etude - Feux Follets, Friedheim
Liszt, Valse Impromptu, Lamond
Liszt, Valse Oubliee No. 1, Barere
Moszkowski, En Automne, Gabrilowitsch
Philipp, Feux-Follets,'Jack O'Lanterns', Novaes
Rachmaninoff, Lilacs, Op. 21, No. 5, Rachmaninoff
Ravel, Menuet sur le nom d'Haydn, Casadesus
Schubert, Litanei, Hungerford
Schubert, Moment Musical in F Minor, Backhaus
Schubert-Liszt, Hark, Hark, The Lark, Arrau
Schumann, Novellette in D, Friedberg
Schumann-Liszt, Fruhlingsnacht, J. Lhevinne

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat Sep 02, 2006 7:23 pm

Mendelssohn Piano Trio #1
Corlyss
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Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Sun Sep 03, 2006 3:47 am

J.S. Bach: "Ich will den Kreuzstab gerne tragen" BWV 56 with Quasthoff, DG :)

Zelenka: Capriccio No. 2, Das Neu-Eröffnete Orchestre, Sonnentheil, CPO

Hummel: Rondo Brillant, Op 98, Howard Shelley, Chandos
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Sep 03, 2006 1:27 pm

In the week ending Saturday, 2 SEP 2006, I listened to the following:

1 ) 10/10 Bach: Cantatas 30, 31--Rilling, usual suspects. hanssler CBE V. 10.

2 ) 10/10 Bach: Mass in B Minor--Rilling, usual suspects. 2-hanssler CBE V. 70.

3 ) 10/10 Danzi, Franz (1763-1826): 3 Wind Quintets, Op. 68/1,2, & 3 in A Major, F Major, and D minor respectively; Quintet in D Major for piano, flute, oboe, clarinet, & bassoon, Op. 54--Berlin Phil Wind Quintet, Love Derwinger, piano--MHS, lic from BIS

4 ) 10/10 Mahler: Sym 3--SFSO, Michael Tilson Thomas, cond., Michelle DeYoung, mezzo-soprano, SFS Women's Chorus, SF Girls Cho, Pacific Boychoir--2 SFS--One of the better performances available. Though I still prefer the Sony Bernstein overall, this has moved into 2nd place.

5 ) 10/10 Stravinsky: Le sacre du printemps; The Firebird (1919 vers); Jeu de cartes (The Card Party); Petrouchka (1911 vers); Pulcinella (1947 vers)--Claudio Abbado, cond LSO--2 DG--I recommend this recording as a first choice for a survey of Stravinsk's most popular works. In other words, if you are just starting out and have no Stravinsky in your collection, get this and it will hold you until you have 1,000 CDs.

6 ) 10/10 Bloch: Macbeth--2 interludes (1919) (13:25); 3 Jewish poems (1913) (24:15); In Memoriam (for pianist Ada Clement) (1952) (4:27); Symphony in E Flat (1955) (24:52)--Dalia Atlas Sternberg, cond Royal Phil Orch.--ASV--This was the most delightful CD I listened to this week. Dalia Atlas Sternberg is an Israeli conductor with a vigorous, muscular conducting style full of attention to detail and inner voices. I don't know why she isn't better known. She certainly deserves to be.

7 ) 10/10 Shostakovich: Sym 8, 11--Haitink, Concertgebouw Orch--separate records, of course--Philips--Don't listen to these two symphonies one right after the other. If you do, they will put you in a deep funk from which you may never return if you have any inclination toward depression at all.

8 ) 10/9 The Art of Julius Katchen, V. 7--2 Decca CDs--Beethoven: Piano sonatas 23 "Appassionata," & 32; Diabelli Variations; 6 Bagatelles, Op. 126; Polonaise in C, Op. 89 |Mozart: Piano Sonatas 13, K. 333, & 16, K. 545--Some seldom heard Beethoven (except for the Appassionata), and my 2 favorite Mozart piano sonatas. What could be more perfect? The Mozarts and the Appassionata are all in mono from 1956. The others are from 1961 and 1968. As always with this series, state of the art sound for the recording dates.
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Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Sun Sep 03, 2006 3:33 pm

Mozart S#41 (Krips/Israel PO)
Schumann S#4 (Ancerl/Toronto SO)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Sep 03, 2006 6:43 pm

Image

lively music, beautifully recorded in the Troy Savings Bank venue - my favorite early-music record.

hautbois
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Post by hautbois » Mon Sep 04, 2006 2:40 am

Mozart Symphony No. 40, 41

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Krips, Harnoncourt (2 separate recordings). Now this 2 are what i call contrast from a conductor's point of view.

Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Mon Sep 04, 2006 3:13 am

Jordi Savall's Boccherini-recording on Alia Vox. Fantastic, like everything Savall does.
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

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Post by hautbois » Mon Sep 04, 2006 12:44 pm

Beethoven Symphony No.9

Wihelm Furtwangler

Schwarzkopf, Hongen, Hopf, Edelmann

Bayreuth Festpiele Orchester und Chor

I am surprised at the superb recording quality (1955) but who would under estimate the interpretative powers of Furtwangler? Any other recordings of his to suggest? No lesser quality recordings please (sound not music).

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Mon Sep 04, 2006 3:15 pm

hautbois wrote:Beethoven Symphony No.9, Wihelm Furtwangler, Schwarzkopf, Hongen, Hopf, Edelmann Bayreuth Festpiele Orchester und Chor

I am surprised at the superb recording quality (1955) but who would under estimate the interpretative powers of Furtwangler? Any other recordings of his to suggest? No lesser quality recordings please (sound not music).
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Here are a few in decent sound I like, but sadly many of my fave WF perfs (e.g. of Bruckner) come live & wouldnt meet your good sound requirement.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


1952 Brahms Symphony No. 1 (DG 427 402-2)
  • {also 1951 (Tahra 1001, also in a Music & Arts box--I havent heard this one but it's touted as the best}
1953 Brahms Symphony No. 3 (DG 423592-2)
1951-1952 Mendelssohn/Bruch Violin Cs (Menuhin) Naxos 8.110991
1947 & 1949 Beethoven & Brahms VCs with Menuhin (Music & Arts 708, EMI CD 63496)
1951 Schubert Symphony # 9 (DG 427 405-2)
1953 Schumann Symphony # 4 (DG 427 404-2)
1953 Beethoven Fidelio, Op. 72 (Modl, Windgassen) Naxos 8.111020-21
1952 Wagner Tristan und Isolde (EMI CMS 67626EMI or CDS 7 47322 8, but the best sounding could be on Naxos Historical 8.110321-24).
1938 Tchaikovsky, Symphony No. 6 "Pathétique"(Naxos 8.110865)


___________________________
WF sites:

Classical Notes

The Best Recordings, WF Society France
  • >>The best CD’s are those edited by the various Furtwängler societies. The major labels EMI and DG usually produce satisfactory results, but Naxos shall be preferred as they have excellent remastering engineers.Amongst the smaller companies Tahra and Biddulph do an excellent job, whereas the quality is usually disappointing among the editors accustomed to recopying sources that are neither original nor of good quality ((Andromede, Archipel, Arkadia, Nuova, Era, Rodolphe etc.). Music and Arts has produced numerous recordings of Furtwängler. We were used to find the sound quality mediocre, with an aggressive middle register, typical of US remasterings, resulting from an excess of filtering of low and high notes, however recent efforts of remastering brought good results.<<
[/color]

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Mon Sep 04, 2006 7:33 pm

Inspired by the Bartok thread I listened to

Second Violin Concerto - Mullova, Salonen, LA Philharmonic
Concerto for Orchestra, The Wooden Prince and Divertimento - Boulez, Chicago Symphony

Also Haydn's String Quartet Op. 77 No. 1
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Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Tue Sep 05, 2006 1:25 pm

Last night I put on an old Supraphon LP (ST-59763) of wind-ensemble works from these Czech masters, played by the Prague Chamber Ensemble:
Josef Mysliveček (1737-1781): Octets #1 & #2 (both in E-flat)
Franz Krommer (1759-1831): Harmony for winds, Op. 57 (in F)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Tue Sep 05, 2006 4:30 pm

Right now, however, it's Borodin's Second (Varviso.......a lot less phlegmatic than Maga).
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Tue Sep 05, 2006 6:33 pm

CPO does it again. Here's a new release with Kalliwoda's 5th and 7th symphonies beautifully performed.

Kalliwoda was once considered a very mainstream composer. When the predecessor to the New York Philharmonic gave its first concert in 1842, Kalliwoda's Fifth Symphony was on the program and serious music lovers knew his name and his works.

Check it out - a Kalliwoda renaaissance is coming.

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anasazi
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Post by anasazi » Wed Sep 06, 2006 1:20 am

JS Bach orchestral suite #4 (Boston Baroque)

Sam. Barber string quartet.
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karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Sep 06, 2006 7:40 am

Shostakovich
String Quartet No. 1 in C Major, Opus 49
Borodin Qtet
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Wed Sep 06, 2006 3:00 pm

Tonight I am listening to Robert King's recording of sacred music by Johann Schelle. Little known today, but very beautiful.
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Wed Sep 06, 2006 3:46 pm

Image

Barry
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Post by Barry » Wed Sep 06, 2006 8:34 pm

Bruckner's 7th: Rattle/BPO at the Proms, and what a performance! This has to be one of the best performances of the seventh I've heard. Rattle led an outstanding performance of it here in Philly last season, but this one was even better. The BPO played with tremendous power and passion. I believe it's still available to listen to on the BBC's Proms web site for a couple more days.
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 09, 2006 2:37 am


Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Sat Sep 09, 2006 3:59 am

Carl Maria von Weber: Quartet for Piano, Violin, Viola and Violoncello Op 8, with Gidon Kremer, Veronika and Clemens Hagen etc.

J.S. Bach: Flute Sonata BWV 1035 - the new recording by Lars Ulrik Mortensen and Linde Brunsmayr-Tutz
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

anasazi
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Post by anasazi » Sat Sep 09, 2006 11:26 am

Brahms piano concerto #2, Serkin & Szell. A classic.
"Take only pictures, leave only footprints" - John Muir.

CharmNewton
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Post by CharmNewton » Sat Sep 09, 2006 11:46 am

Returned to Robert Woolley's CD of music of Frescobaldi and while it still sounds English it is also appealing in its understated way. The recorded sound of this 20 year old recording well captures the intimacy of Woolley's approach.

John

mourningstar
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Post by mourningstar » Sat Sep 09, 2006 12:48 pm

I was listening(this whole week) to some old LP's, they are recordings from the famous cellist; Pablo Casals. Such lovely and beautiful music.

Bach Cello works :

Suite no.1 in G Major
Suite no.6 in D Major

Adagio in A minor from Toccata
Komm, susser tod
Andante from Sonate no.2
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Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Sat Sep 09, 2006 2:09 pm

I was listening to Rillings recording of Mendelssohn's Elias, with Christine Schäfer and Michael Schade. Issued by Brilliant Classics. Very beautiful. Especially the aria "Es ist genug" was very touching. :D
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

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Post by Ralph » Sat Sep 09, 2006 8:49 pm

Familiar at all with the works of Beethoven's prolific pal, Czerny? No? Well, this new Hanssler release offers two of his symphonies very well performed. Czerny wasn't the most original composer but he is a strong orchestrator whose music has firm melodic lines. The influence of Haydn, Beethoven and Dittersdorf is clear.

Check it out.

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RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Sep 10, 2006 1:44 am

In the week ending Saturday, 9 SEP 2006, I have listed to the following:

1 ) 10/10 Bach, J.S.: Early works for organ from the Ohrdruf, Luneburg & Anrstadt periods, 32 tracks--Andrea Marcon, organist--2 hanssler CDs, CBE Vol. 87.

2 ) 10/10 Bach, J.S.: Cantatas 32,33,34--Helmuth Rilling, cond usual suspects--hannsler CD, CBE Vol. 11.

3 ) 10/10 Danzi: 3 Wind Quintets, Op 67; Quintet in F Major for piano, flute, oboe, clarinet, & bassoon, Op. 53--Berlin Phil Wind Quintet, Love Derwinger, piano in Op. 53--MHS, lic from BIS.

4 ) 10/10 Blumer: Swiss Quintet (1953)(18.48 ); Kinderspielzeug [Childrens' Toys] for Wind Quintet, Op. 63 (11:45); Sextet for piano and wind quintet [Kammersinfonie], Op. 92 (1941) (36:36)--Moran Wind Quintet [John Bailey, flute, William McMullen, oboe, Diane Barger, clarinet, Albie Micklich, bassoon, Allen French, horn], Paul Barnes, piano (in Sextet)--Crystal. All the musicians here are members of the faculty at the School of Music of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. It is named in honor of the late John Moran, former director of the School of Music. These are all world premiere recordings of works by Theodor Blumer (1881-1964). They are fine, tuneful works in a throughly conservative idiom.

5 ) 9/10 Mahler: Sym 6--SFSO, Michael Tilson Thomas, cond. (87:30)--2 CD SFS set. Although the liner notes tell of the expressions of violence in this work, this seems to me one of the more pastoral performances of this music that I have heard. MTT is best n the quiet, lyrical, achingly beautiful passages of the socre, not so convincing in the Sturm und Drang aspects. Its also one of the slowest, longest performances if the work I know.

6 ) 10/10 Elgar: Sym 1 & 2, Pomp and Circumstance Marches, Op. 39, Coronation March, Imperial March, "Pageant of Empire": Empire March--Y Menuhin, cond., Royal Phil--2 Virgin CDs

7 ) 9/9 Stravinsky: Rite of Spring; Fireworks; Circus Polka; Greeting Prelude "Happy Birthday"--Mackerras, LPO. Classics for Pleasure CD

8 ) 10/10 Stravinsky: Rite of Spring |Scriabin: Poem of Ecstasy--Gergiev, cond. Kirov Orch--Philips. These are great performances, in superb sound.

9 ) Shostakovich: Sym 13 "Babi Yar"--Haitink, cond.Concertgebouw Orch & Men's Choir, Marius Rintzler, bass--Philips--CD 9 of 11 CD set of the symphonies--This is one of the great performances of this work. Rintzler in particular is in superb form.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Christoph
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Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 11:22 am
Location: Vienna, Austria

Post by Christoph » Sun Sep 10, 2006 2:54 am

Last night I listened to Arriaga's 1st String quartet, performed by the Sine Nomine Quartet. To me their recording at the Claves label is still the best recording of the Arriaga Quartets.

This morning Haydn: Sym. No. 98, conducted by Harnoncourt
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

jserraglio
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Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Post by jserraglio » Sun Sep 10, 2006 6:28 am

<img src="http://users.flxtek.net/~jserraglio/Prokofiev_Sym6.gif" width="200" height="200">
<div align="left">"That's the way Stravinsky was - bup bup bup - The poor guy's dead now - play it legato."--Ormandy

paulb
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Joined: Tue May 23, 2006 6:08 pm
Location: baton rouge

Post by paulb » Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:15 pm

Shostakovich's powerful and beautiful 11th sym/Kondrashin/Moscow on the new Aulos release. I 'slightly" prefer the more brighter/distorted original release on Melodyia.
I wonder what mahler fans thing and feel after they hear Shostakovich's gripping 11th. :roll:
Psalm 118:22 The Stone that the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone.
23 This is the Lord's doing , it is marvelous in our sight.

Wallingford
Posts: 4521
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Post by Wallingford » Tue Sep 12, 2006 4:56 pm

Bloch's Schelomo & Voice In The Wilderness (Starker/Mehta/Israel PO)
Enescu's Roumanian Rhapsodies & Rachmaninov's Symphonic Dances (Comissiona/Vancouver SO)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Wallingford
Posts: 4521
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Post by Wallingford » Tue Sep 12, 2006 4:59 pm

paulb wrote: I wonder what mahler fans thing and feel after they hear Shostakovich's gripping 11th. :roll:
Amen to that!!! (Pierre Boulez, are you listening out there?....I highly doubt it.)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

hautbois
Posts: 173
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 6:59 am
Location: East Malaysia

Post by hautbois » Wed Sep 13, 2006 9:54 am

Alban Berg
Kammerkonzert

Stravinsky
Ebony Concerto, Dumbarton Oaks, 8 Miniatures

Daniel Barenboim, Pinchas Zukerman, Michel Arrignon
Pierre Boulez, Ensemble Intercontemporain

Wallingford
Posts: 4521
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Post by Wallingford » Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:12 pm

A pair of Bach Cantatas (w/Ansermet & vocalists Agnes Giebel, Helen Watts, Ian Partridge & Tom Krause)
Schumann's Cello Concerto (Fournier/Sawallisch)
Also, Grieg nut that I am, I just took home for $1.20 his own volume in that "Classics Of A Lifetime" series BMG put out some years ago with maestro Don Jackson & the LPO......VERY geared to the coffee mainstream crowd, with Grieg's most mellow numbers, like the Holberg Suite's "Sarabande," the 2nd Symphonic Dance, "Morning Mood," "Solveig's Song," and the like. The disc's none too concerned with his more interesting, folklore-inspired side.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Wallingford
Posts: 4521
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Post by Wallingford » Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:45 pm

FINALLY--an LP of a composer with whom I'm uninitiated: a rather melodic Norwegian (b. 1919, d. 1994), OISTEIN SOMMERFELDT.

This is a Norwegian Composers label LP, NC-4902, including:
Towards A Yearning (For Piano & Orch), Op.50 (w/Eva Knardahl, & Janssons & the OPO);
his song About Love, Op.46 (sung by Toril Carlsen, accompanied by a lone cello--Aage Ivalbein);
2 Stein Mehren Songs, Op.34b (Knut Skram, w/Jansons & OPO);
the solo piano suite Fable Suite #3, Op. 51 (Geir Henning Braaten);
From William Blake's Poetry, Op. 53 ("The Fly," "The Garden Of Love," & "The Little Vagabond") (sung by Toril Carlsen, w/Braaten on piano; Erik Sgenstadvold, guitar; and Hans Olav Gorset, flute);
and the Sinfonia la Bettula, Op. 12 (Jansons/OPO).

VERY attractive stuff, indeed.....don't know if this was out on CD, but it should've.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

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