What are you listening to?

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anasazi
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Post by anasazi » Fri Sep 15, 2006 11:22 pm

Rachmaninov "Vespers". Robert Shaw, etc.
"Take only pictures, leave only footprints" - John Muir.

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 16, 2006 2:54 am

Image

hautbois
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Post by hautbois » Sat Sep 16, 2006 10:58 am

Alexander Zemlinsky
Lyric Symphony

Deborah Vogt, Soprano
Bryn Terfel, Bass-Baritone
Giuseppe Sinopoli, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

Lark Ascending
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Post by Lark Ascending » Sat Sep 16, 2006 1:38 pm

Stravinsky - The Firebird & Petrushka (Philharmonia Orchestra/Robert Craft)
Holst - The Planets (BBC Symphony Orchestra/Sir Andrew Davis)
"Look here, I have given up my time, my work, my friends and my career to come here and learn from you, and I am not going to write a petit menuet dans le style de Mozart." - Ralph Vaughan Williams to Maurice Ravel

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Sep 17, 2006 1:55 am

In the week ending Saturday, 16 SEP 2006, I listened to the following:

1 ) 9/7 "Robert Casadesus in Concert"--Saint Saens: PC 4, Franck: Symphonic Variations--Horenstein, cond. Montreux Festival Orch (1961) |Ravel: Left Hand Concerto--van Beinum, Concertgebouw Orch (1946). Music & Arts. Good performances, but not spectacular. Sound quality is a tad below the best for the dates of recording. Disappointing for a pianist I have always found excellent in other releases. Not recommended.

2 ) 10/10 Shostakovich:Sym 14 (49:45); 6 Poems by Marina Tsvetseva (21:56)--Haitink, RCOA. Singers: Julia Varady, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau in sym; Ortrun Wenkel in poems. Philips. Superb performances.

3 ) 9/10 Shostakovich: Sym 15 (45:42); From Jewish Folk Poetry (27:34)--Haitink, London Phil (in sym), RCOA (in poems)--singers in poems--Elisabeth Soderstrom, Ortrun Wenkel, Ryszard Karczykowski. Philips. The poems are well and idiomatically performed, and the middle movements of the symphony are superb as well. But the first movement of the symphony, which portrays a young boy playing with toys, is speedy, almost frenetic. This little boy could benefit from some ritalin. The last movement comes up short on the misterioso element in the last 90 seconds or 2 minutes. Its supposed to fade away, like a very sick, weak man in a reverie about his childhood, and then slowly, almost imperceptibly, sliding into unconsciousness, then death. This performance is far too loud at the end to adequately convey that impression.

4 ) 10/10 Mahler: Sym. 7 (78:11)--Michael Tilson Thomas, SFSO.

5 ) 10/10 Schumann: Symphonies--Zinman, Tonhalle Orch., Zurich. 2 CD Arte Nova set. Excellent performances of the 1st 3 symphonies, falls below the highest standard in the 4th, I feel.

6 ) 10/10 Handel: Judas Maccabeus--Somary, cond. English CO, Harper, Watts, Young, Sirley-Quirk. 2 CD Vanguard set. This is a classic set The four soloists, esp the women, are superb artists, all of whom worked together on inumerable productions. Stylish, HIP performance from 1971, highly recommended.

7 ) 10/9 J.S. Bach: Early Harpshicord Music, Vol 2--Robert Hill, hpsi. This is the second 2 CD set of earlly hpsi works performed by Mr. Hill. 2 CD hanssler set from CBE. Recorded too closely and at a much higher level than most of the other CDs in this series. I had to turn the volume down several notches to make it bearable. Also, this is the first issue in this series that I have encountered which is an any way defective. Fortunately, it doesn't affect the music, and the liner notes are just fine. However, CD1 has the hpsi music in the digits, but the face of the CD says it is a recording of CD 1 of the St Matthew Passion!
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

hautbois
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Post by hautbois » Sun Sep 17, 2006 4:47 am

Ludwig van Beethoven

Symphony No.6 'Pastoral'
Leonore Overture
Coriolan Overture
Fidelio Overture

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Chamber Orchestra of Europe

Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Sun Sep 17, 2006 6:19 am

Since yesterday I listened to:

Schönber: Pelleas and Mellisande, Thielemann, DG;
Wagner: Tannhäuser, Solti, Decca;
Cecilia Bartoli: Opera prohibita, Decca;

And I watched the DVD of Schreker's "Die Gezeichneten" (Production from the Salzburg festival 2005), conducted by Kent Nagano.
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Mon Sep 18, 2006 3:11 pm

Well, I just got in on the Seattle Public Library's semi-annual book sale, and in addition to finally getting my own copies of Johanna Fiedler's bio of her dad, Arthur Fiedler: Papa, The Pops And Me and B.H. Haggin's Conversations With Toscanini, I got these neat LPs for a half-a-buck-a-throw:

Miklos Rosza Conducts Rosza (w/VSOO, on Westminster WG-8353)
Tchaikovsky's Second (Swarowsky/VSO, on Urania USD-1006)
Mahler's Ninth & Schoenberg's Verklaerte (Kletzki/Israel PO, on Angel 3256-B)
Lully's incidental music to Moliere plays (Bernet/VSO, on MHS 704)
Grieg's Holberg Suite (Boyd Neel's String Orch., on London/Decca LPS-173)
Dvorak's Noonday Witch & Golden Spinning Wheel (Talich/CPO, on Urania URLP-7073)
Vaughan Williams' Tallis Fantasia & Dvorak's Serenade For Strings (Stokowski/RPO, on Desmar 1011)
Deep Purple With The Royal Philharmonic (Warner 1860)

I should say: I rounded up the last two above as well as the superior copy (of two in stock) of Jacques Loussier's take on the Bach Brandenburgs, so I could dub a nice little RPO compilation for Walkman listening--but some anonymous scumbag up and LIFTED it and I wasn't even aware of it till I saw a guy with the inferior copy in the checkout line. I now realize this must be an in-demand item, but my overall opinion of jazz nuts has now been lowered.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

anasazi
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Post by anasazi » Mon Sep 18, 2006 6:39 pm

Wallingford wrote:Well, I just got in on the Seattle Public Library's semi-annual book sale, and in addition to finally getting my own copies of Johanna Fiedler's bio of her dad, Arthur Fiedler: Papa, The Pops And Me and B.H. Haggin's Conversations With Toscanini, I got these neat LPs for a half-a-buck-a-throw:

Miklos Rosza Conducts Rosza (w/VSOO, on Westminster WG-8353)
I adore Rozsa's Concerto for Strings. I have the same album, it's quite enjoyable.
"Take only pictures, leave only footprints" - John Muir.

johnQpublic
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Post by johnQpublic » Tue Sep 19, 2006 7:15 am

Imbrie's Violin Concerto on a Columbia LP featuring Carroll Glenn.

Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Fri Sep 22, 2006 4:07 pm

J.S. Bach: Suite for Lute BWV 995, Jakob Lindberg

Reger: An die Hoffnung Op. 124; Hymnus der Liebe Op 136 with Annelies Burmeister, Heinz Bongartz conducting the Rundfunk-Sinfonie-Orchester Leipzig. Old GDR recordings.
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

PJME
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Fall...- it is still warm outside....

Post by PJME » Fri Sep 22, 2006 4:18 pm

Charles Martin Loeffler : Two rhapsodies for oboe, viola and piano :L'étang (the pond) and La cornemuse ( The bagpipe) very lovely & impressionistic.
Aux marches du Palais : Romances et complaintes de la France d'autrefois .Sung by Le poème harmonique / Vincent Dumestre. Another jewel in the crown of the Alpha label - this CD is sold now for ca 8-9 euro as the 2006 catalogue. Very,very beautiful.

hautbois
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Re: Fall...- it is still warm outside....

Post by hautbois » Sat Sep 23, 2006 2:55 am

PJME wrote:Charles Martin Loeffler : Two rhapsodies for oboe, viola and piano :L'étang (the pond) and La cornemuse ( The bagpipe) very lovely & impressionistic.
Can i have more information regarding this piece of music, and...the ultimate question of where to get a copy of the recording? :twisted:
Thanks!!

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 23, 2006 4:23 am

Image

PJME
Posts: 780
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Loeffler + oboe

Post by PJME » Sat Sep 23, 2006 4:26 am

Hello Hautbois, I have these works on an ASV CD DCA 1139. Performers:
"Conchord" : Emily Pailthorpe, oboe, Douglas Paterson, viola and Julian Milford piano. On the same CD: works by Gabriel Pierné: sonata da camera (flute,cello & piano),a Prélude,récitatif &variations (flute,cello,piano) by Maurice Duruflé and 5 songs for baritone,viola & piano by Loeffler.
Charles Martin Loeffler (1861-1935) was a talented composer of German origin, who settled in the US ca 1882 and became a member (violin,viola?) of the Boston SO. His works cover a wide range -and I suppose that many scores still wait to be published or performed...What I've heard is very refined -Franck,Debussy come to mind. In his orchestral works the colorful orchestration is redolent of Rimsky Korsakov.... Ravel. The booklet gives following information:
The Rhapsodies started life as songs, but ,after the death of a BostonSO colleague Léon Pourteau (clarinet), he rewrote them in memory of the musician.
Elegant,atmospheric,impressionistic,with a dark undertone.

The Rhapsodies have also been recorded on the Crystal Rec.label (John Mack) and the Delos label. Possibly on Naxos -they have an interesting disc with works for strings.
Amazon has the discs

Donaldopato
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Post by Donaldopato » Sat Sep 23, 2006 10:18 am

The newly released Lyrita recording of William Wordsworth's Symphonies 2 and 3. Conservative yet well crafted and interesting.

Lyrita SRCD207 London Philharmonic, Braithwaite conducting.

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 23, 2006 12:01 pm

<img src="http://users.flxtek.net/~jserraglio/Wagner_Parsifal.gif" width="400" height="400">

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Sep 24, 2006 1:32 am

In the week ending Saturday, 23 SEP 2006, I didn't listen to much music. I was mostly watching the new shows and the new season opeinings of old favorites on TV. The only new one I have found so far, though, that I like is JERICHO. Jericho is a fictional small town in western Kansas; in the first episode it becomes apparent that Denver has been hit with a nuclear weapon when the townsfolk see a mushroom cloud on the horizon. Later, it becomes apparent that Atlanta has also been hit when a teenager plays the tape of a phone call from his mother who was visiting Atlanta; the nuclear attack happens in the middle of what was to have been a longer message. The series is about the efforts of the town to survive what seems to be a massive attack on the US.

Well, anyway, I did get some listening in. Here it is--

1 ) 10/10 Mozart: Don Giovanni--Barenboim, cond. BPO & RIAS Chamber Choir--3 Warner Classics CDs.

2 ) 10/10 Danzi, Franz: 3 Wind Quintets, Op 56. #1 in B Flat Major (15:52); #2 in G Minor (15:53); #3 in F Major (22:30); Quintet in D Minor, Op 41 for piano, oboe, clarinet, horn, & bassoon (22:58 )--Berlin Phil Wind Quintet, Love Derwinger, piano in Op 41.--MHS, lic from BIS. The piano quintet is an especially fine work.

3 ) 10/10 Beethoven: Syms 1 & 2--Wyn Morris, London Sym Orch.--Carlton Classics. I have acquired Wyn Morris's set of all the Beethoven syms on 6 CDs and will be listening to the others in the coming weeks. I have heard about this set for years, but only became interested in acquiring it a number of months ago when I read that Morris had been a protege of George Szell, who was, as everyone knows, the greatest conductor who ever lived. :wink: These performances are lively and enthusiastic, infused with the same sense of pulse and attention to bringing out the inner voices that were the hallmark of Szell's work. But more than that, one senses that these musicians are really having a joyous time working with Morris, something that could not always be said of those who worked with Szell. Highly recommended. I got it from Arkiv Music, but I got 3-9 from Berkshire Record Outlet, which still has them available.

4 ) 10/10 Glazunov: Sym 1, Op. 5 "Slavyanskaya" (37:31); Violin Concerto (21:35)--Russian State Sym Orch, Valeri Polyansky, cond., Julia Krasko, violin (in concerto). MHS, lic from Chandos, part of a 5 CD set of the 6 symphonies and a number of other orchestral works.

5 ) 10/10 Mahler: Sym 9 (89:27)--Michael Tilson Thomas, cond. SFSO--2 CD set.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Christoph
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Post by Christoph » Sun Sep 24, 2006 6:34 am

On Saturday I listened to:

Robert Schumann: Konzertstück for 4 Horns; Sym No. 4 (Version 1841), both Gardiner, DG

Dvorak: Piano Trio "Dumky", Suk Trio, Supraphon (my favorite recording of the trios)

Saint-Saens: Piano Trio No. 1, Altenberg Trio, Challenge

Reger: Hiller-Variations, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Konwitschny, Berlin Classics
"Without music life would be a mistake." (Nietzsche)

AntonioA
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Post by AntonioA » Mon Sep 25, 2006 2:05 pm

Fallas El Amor Brujo. A 1996 recording using the 1914 version, with recitals and dialogues. And a real "cantaora". I prefer this 1914 version to Fallas later revisions. This CD is released by Almaviva records and took me a long time to find. But it was worth it. The cantaora Esperanza Fernandez is hypnotic.
AntonioA

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Mon Sep 25, 2006 8:18 pm

AntonioA wrote:Fallas El Amor Brujo. A 1996 recording using the 1914 version, with recitals and dialogues. And a real "cantaora". I prefer this 1914 version to Fallas later revisions. This CD is released by Almaviva records and took me a long time to find. But it was worth it. The cantaora Esperanza Fernandez is hypnotic.
TERRIFIC 4-CD set. It's also got the best performance (50s, I believe) of El Retablo de Maese Pedro.....at least the boy puppet character sounds convincingly like a real boy, not a soprano imitating a boy. Here, the lady singer milks the boy's staccato monotone delivery to maximum comic effect.
Sadly, I recently had to sell my copy to someone in Taiwan..... :cry:
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Thu Sep 28, 2006 8:06 pm

THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67

Christoph Eschenbach, conductor
Recorded live September 24, 2005

MP3 dloaded free from the PhillyO website. sounds great even @256kbps.
Last edited by jserraglio on Sat Sep 30, 2006 8:58 am, edited 1 time in total.

Barry
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Post by Barry » Thu Sep 28, 2006 8:10 pm

jserraglio wrote:THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67

Christoph Eschenbach, conductor
Recorded live September 24, 2005

MP3 dloaded free from the PhillyO website. sounds great even @256kbps.
I saw them perform all nine of the symphonies last season. I thought the Eroica was the highlight of the set. I'll probably buy that download soon.

I did download the Sawallisch Schubert 9th and Shostakovich 5th in flac format and am very happy with the sound, as well as the performances.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Fri Sep 29, 2006 5:01 am

Barry Z wrote: I saw them perform all nine of the symphonies last season. I thought the Eroica was the highlight of the set. I'll probably buy that download soon.

I did download the Sawallisch Schubert 9th and Shostakovich 5th in flac format and am very happy with the sound, as well as the performances.
Thanks, I might just try some of these in the FLAC lossless compression. Ive always liked Eschenbach as a pianist. I wish other orchestras would get with it, but Philly has the tradition, I reckon, pushing the envelope, e.g. Stokowski recording in stereo in the '30s.
And that Winamp player is very nice. I've been using Winamp lite but the full free version is definitely the way to go with its inviting interface and the plugins.

Barry
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Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:50 pm

Post by Barry » Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:13 pm

Yes, I've been very happy with Winamp. It's pretty easy to use.

I did download that Eroica last night.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 30, 2006 8:55 am

Image
--------------------
my first hearing of this Strauss record, I love it.

Barry
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Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:50 pm

Post by Barry » Sat Sep 30, 2006 1:00 pm

Sticking with Ormandy, there is a new EuroArts DVD out of Ormandy-led Philadelphia Orchestra performances of the Tchaikovsky violin concerto (with a youngish looking Perlman), the R&J Overture and Pictures at an Exhibition from the late 70s, near the end of Ormandy's tenure. I've read that he sometimes lost his grip on the orchestra during his last years, but he knew these pieces so well that he looked firmly in charge throughout. His movements were fairly limited, but his arms moved up and down to keep the beat in a very fluid manor, rather than with sharp movements; that being part of his Philadelphia sound, a little less sharp-edged than the CSO under Reiner and Cleveland under Szell.

These are great performances, although I have a preference for Ormandy's Sony Pictures recording.

The R&J Overture is gorgeous. My only complaint with the DVD is that during the concerto, the camera focused solely on Perlman for probably 80 percent of the performance. You don't get to see the great exchanges between orchestra and soloist during the finale. The camera work was better for the other two pieces.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Sat Sep 30, 2006 11:17 pm

Image

*****

Here's an interesting new NAXOS release. Gounod's symphonies aren't that well known. This is an excellent performance of works by Bizet's teacher. Not great symphonies but enjoyable listening.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

hautbois
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Post by hautbois » Sun Oct 01, 2006 8:23 am

Ralph wrote:Not great symphonies but enjoyable listening.
The aim of Francaix's music making - To give pleasure. And that has been all what i have been looking for for the past 2,3 weeks.

Shostakovich Symphony No. 5 & 9
Leonard Bernstein
New York Philharmonic (Sony)

Though i won't say that 5 and 9 to be 'UN-great", they certainly are easier for pure pleasurable listening. :D

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Oct 01, 2006 10:36 am

Beethoven: Piano Sonata no.29 in B flat major, op.106 "Hammerklavier" - Otakar Vondrovic, pianist

------------

Very impressive performance beautifully transferred, rec mid 50s - available from Bearac Reissues as this week's free download - MP3 - 192 kbps.

<div align ="center">Image
  • Otakar Vondrovic in a name only for his pupils today. This great Slovakian pianist was born in 1908 and died in 1985. He studied in Prague Conservatory, then went to Paris, where he attended the Ecole Normale de Musique. He showed special affinity for the works of Franz Liszt creating a name for himself as top class virtuoso. Equally sensational were his recitals in which he played the 32 piano sonatas of Beethoven during three seasons - from 1951 to 1953. In 1963 he started teaching piano classes in the Conservatory of Brno and soon devoted himself in forming younger generations of pianists. He became a legend both as a performer and as a teacher. The Hammerklavier Sonata we offer you in downloadable MP3 format was recorded during the period of his high acclaim as a recitalist. It is a remarkable performance, at once classically poised and subversive. His technical mastery is of course beyond question; equally overwhelming is his view of the great work both as a monument in the history of piano as well as a living, dramatic utterance, drawing from the strenuous life experiences of Beethoven the man. Recorded very well at the Supraphon studios, in mono of course, this is a rare recording of a masterpiece sure to transfix the listener.

RebLem
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Post by RebLem » Sun Oct 01, 2006 12:33 pm

In the last week of September, 2006, I listened to the following:

10/10 Bach: Brandenburg Concerti--Rilling, Oregon Bach Festival Chamber Orchestra. 2 CD hanssler set, V 126 of the CBE. Very fine HIP performance with the usual high trumpet part in #2 (I prefer Marriner's horn version) performed by musicians who are NOT, except for Rilling, the usual suspects in this series.

10/10 Bach: Cantatas 35, 36, 37--Rilling, Bach-Collegium Stuttgart, Gachinger Kantorei. hanssler CD, V. 012 of CBE.

9/10 Beethoven: Sym 3; Coriolan Overture--Wyn Morris, cond, LSO--MCA Classics Very fine performances. I gave it a 9 instead of a 10 because I feel that in works as frequently recorded as the Beethoven symphonies, one should give a 10 only to the very greatest performances, which this is not. Superb sound, recorded c. 1988.

8/10 Schumann: Davidsbundlertanze, Op. 6; Phantasiestucke, Op. 111; Gesange der Fruhe, Op. 133; Klavierstucke, Op. 32--Jorg Demus, piano. Nuovo Era CD. V. 1 (of 13) in Schumann's Complete Piano Works. These are pleasant performances, but nothing really grabbed my attention. However, I am a great deal less confident about my judgment here than in many of my reviews. Schumann's piano music is not one of the main focuses of my collection, to say the least, and I really don't have a good idea of how they should go.

8/10 Schumann: Carnaval, Op. 9; Albumblatter, Op. 124; Canon for Alexis; Arabeske, Op. 18--Jorg Demus, piano. Nuovo Era CD. V. 2 (of 13) of Schumann's Complete Piano Works. See comments above. Carnaval is the one piece here I have heard before. I haven't done a direct A/B comparison, but it seems to me that this is a more subdued, perhaps even lackluster, performance than this work usually gets.

10/10 Glazunov: Sym 2, Op 16; Coronation Cantata, Op 56 (premiere recording)--Polyansky, cond, Russian State Sym Orch. & Capella (in cantata), 4 soloists in cantata. MHS, lic from Chandos. The Second symphony is lovely noodling, but the Coronation Cantata of 1896, composed for the coronation of Czar Nicholas II and performed at his installation, is the piece of interest here. Lovely, wonderful melodies, glorious climaxes designed to convey a sense of confidence. It only worked for 21 years.

10/10 Glaxunov: Sym 3; Concert Waltzes--#1, Op. 47, #2, Op 51. Polyansky, cond Russian State Sym Orch. MHS, lic from Chandos. Sym 3 seems to me a more substantial work than #2. Superbly orchestrated, with all sorts of surprising little twists, turns, and unexpected felicities. The Concert Waltzes are definitely pleasant, melodious works in the Viennese manner. Rather Johann Straussy.

10/10 Mahler: Syms 1, 2, 4--Michael Tilson Thomas, cond. SFSO. SFS label--these are fine recordings (4 CDs, which I am reporting on together, though each symphony is in a separate box. The great, recently deceased Lorraine Hunt Lieberson is the mezzo in Sym. 2; soprano Isabel Bayrakdarian aquits herself extradordinarily well, too. This performance has an expecially strong denoument. The soprano in the 4th is Laura Claycomb. Except for the last movement of the 2nd, MTTs way with Mahler seems rather understated and pastoral in these recordings.

10/10 Shostakovich: Syms 1,2,3,4--Barshai, cond. WDR Sinfonieorchester. BRILLIANT. Syms 1-3 on one CD, Sym 4 on another. Separate CDs, but I am reporting on them together,. These are among the very best performances of these works I have heard. The 2nd is probably the weakest, the 4th the strongest. The sound quality and the engineering are absolutely awesome and gripping.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Wed Oct 04, 2006 3:24 pm

Some library CD's I've borrowed for the weekend:

Maazel's take on Ravel's L'Heure Espagnole........I've got the classic Ansermet version, plus Leibowitz's recording & the BBC Music Magazine disc of 3 years back; and I've hesitated the longest time on hearing the present version.

The cast is Jane Berbie as the whorish heroine; with Jose Van Dam, Gabriel Bacquier, Michel Senechal, and Jean Giraudeau as the various men in her life, legal and otherwise. Bacquier is the big-dumb-lug muleteer who's in for a nice surprise by the end of the opera.
Last edited by Wallingford on Wed Oct 04, 2006 3:30 pm, edited 2 times in total.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
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johnQpublic
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Post by johnQpublic » Wed Oct 04, 2006 3:25 pm

I have been listening, over & over, while working....(or at least that's what I want my boss to think) :wink: to this Chandos disc of orchestral music of Karlowicz. It's a wondeful blend of R. Strauss' brassynis and pre-Syzminowski swirling chromatics. Delicious

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Post by Wallingford » Wed Oct 04, 2006 3:36 pm

Another library CD:

Paderewski's Violin Sonata in A minor, op. 13--with Robert Szreder, violin ; Boguslaw Jan Strobel, piano (Pavane ADW-7283).

Owing to his highly lucrative career as a (almost) virtuoso pianist, Paderewski had to leave his composing aspirations behind much of the time; but what he DID bother to write down (like the Piano Concerto) leaves one wistful for more.
Last edited by Wallingford on Wed Oct 04, 2006 6:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Wed Oct 04, 2006 3:37 pm

WAHOO! We've nearly reached this thread's 100th page!!!!! :D :D :D
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

Madame
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Post by Madame » Wed Oct 04, 2006 6:09 pm

Wallingford wrote:WAHOO! We've nearly reached this thread's 100th page!!!!! :D :D :D
Well, let's see if I can help move it along. I'm re-visiting old favorites that have sat in the storage carousel for far too long --

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I'm never quite sure whether it's the music or the album cover that attracts so many buyers :)

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Post by Panzerfaust » Wed Oct 04, 2006 6:57 pm

Schubert: Symphony No. 8 "Unfinished"
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Post by premont » Thu Oct 05, 2006 9:30 am

RebLem wrote: Bach: Brandenburg Concerti--Rilling, Oregon Bach Festival Chamber Orchestra. Very fine HIP performance
How do you define HIP? In Rillings Brandenburgs modern instruments are used, and the performance isn´t more than moderate HIP-style, like the way the concertos were played in the 1960es.

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Post by jserraglio » Fri Oct 06, 2006 6:25 pm

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Post by AntonioA » Sat Oct 07, 2006 4:03 pm

Mahler: Symphony nr 1, conducted by Horenstein (Unicorn)
AntonioA

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Post by RebLem » Sun Oct 08, 2006 2:05 am

In the week ending Saturday, Sep 9, 2006, I listed to only two CDs--

9/10 Beethoven: Syms 4, 5--Wyn Morris, LSO--IMP Classics

9/10 Schumann: Piano sonata, Op. 111; Impromptus, Op. 5; 6 Intermezzi, Op. 4--Jorg Demus, piano--V. 3 of 13 CD Nuovo Era set of the complete Schumann solo piano works.

Premont--
Of course, these performances by rilling and the Oregon Bach festival Chamber Orch uses modern strings, which is why it cannot be considered an OIP recording. But it seems to me historically informed, as evidenced by the use of recorders in BWV 1047-9, harpsichord in BWV 1050, and violas da gamba in BWV 1051, and the general sense of retraint and instrumental balance which seems sensitive to baroque performance conventions, but with modern strings.

I only listened to two CDs this week because the connectors between my power amp and my left channel speaker broke while I was retreiving a CD that had fallen down behind the equipment cabinet. My new Nordost replacement cable won't be here til about next Friday the 15th or so.

I may listen to a few mono CDs through the right channel only in the next week, but I have some cath-up cataloguing to do, too. CDs go through 3 phases in my household. When I get them, I take off the shrink wrap and put them in my bedroom until I catalogue their contents on 3 x 5 cards. I currently have about 125 CDs sitting in my BR right now awaiting cataloguing, and I just ordered 50 CDs from BRO early this week. so I have a considerable backlog.

Once catalogued, the CDs go on my "to be listened to" shelves in the living room, organized by quarter of receipt. I just finished my 2005 batches about a month ago, and am now working on the first quarter of 2006 arrivals. After I have listened to them, they go into my regular permanent collection. So I have a big backlog there, too-300 or more CDs in the 1st quarter collection and the 3rd quarter collection; the second quarter collection is somewhat smaller, maybe 200 or so. So you see, I have quite a backlog. And, as I have said before, I have my CBE on the listened to shelves, even though so far I have listened to only about 30 or so of them. So I may just decide not to listen at all this coming week, and to concentrate on catching up on my cataloguing.
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Post by anasazi » Tue Oct 10, 2006 1:56 am

Ibert "Escales" & Mendelssohn String Octet.
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Post by Wallingford » Wed Oct 11, 2006 5:05 pm

Have had a few tapes of some of my favorite French orchestras in the Walkman these days:

With the PARIS CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA:
Scheherazade (Ansermet 1)
Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto (Kogan/Silvestri)
La Valse (Munch)

....and the LAMOUREUX ORCHESTRA:
D'Indy's Symphony On A French Mountain Air (Doyen/Fournet)
Sorcerer's Apprentice (Wolff)
Mozart's Piano Concerto #9 (Gaby Casadesus, w/Paray)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

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Post by johnQpublic » Thu Oct 12, 2006 7:23 am

For the past week at work, this disc has been happily spinning a number of times

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Post by hautbois » Thu Oct 12, 2006 12:04 pm

Handel - Music for the Royal Fireworks. (Original version 1749)

Trevor Pinnock, The English Concert.

What a lovely recording!!!! What could be better than 24 oboes, 12 bassoons etc?

premont
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Post by premont » Thu Oct 12, 2006 1:23 pm

RebLem wrote: Premont--
Of course, these performances by rilling and the Oregon Bach festival Chamber Orch uses modern strings, which is why it cannot be considered an OIP recording. But it seems to me historically informed, as evidenced by the use of recorders in BWV 1047-9, harpsichord in BWV 1050, and violas da gamba in BWV 1051, and the general sense of retraint and instrumental balance which seems sensitive to baroque performance conventions, but with modern strings.
I agree completely, that the Rilling Brandenburgs are relatively historically informed, not because of the use of recorders, harpsichord and viole da gamba, which was common practice already in the 1950es (e.g. Haas, Horenstein, Prohaska, Dart and Menuhin - would you call Menuhin hip?), but because of the general restraint and balance, as you write. I would call Rilling´s a modern instrument (strings, horns, trumpet, oboes, basoon) performance in moderate hip-style, and only use the term hip-recording when it is about a period instrument performance in hip style, as there are even period instrument recordings in questionable hip-style (Kehr 1982 and Collegium Aureum). Of course this doesn´t prevent me from enjoying Rillings Brandenburgs as well as his recordings of Bachs Suites, Violin concertos, restored Violin and Oboe concertos and Harpsichord concertos, - actually I find, that his recordings are often musically more satisfying than some period instrument performances.

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Post by karlhenning » Thu Oct 12, 2006 3:30 pm

Copland
Symphony No. 3
iv. Molto deliberato
Enzedd Symphony / Jas Judd
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
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Post by jserraglio » Thu Oct 12, 2006 4:18 pm

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listning for about the tenth time in recent weeks to 2 great scores in winning perfs by EO/PO. the App Spr is the complete ballet.

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Post by PJME » Thu Oct 12, 2006 4:25 pm

Herman D.Koppel : Concerto for cello & orch op. 56 (1952-1956)
Erling Blondal Bengtsson, Danish Nat.Radio O. / Ole Schmidt /BIS
A realy lovely piece - traditional in form / airy...gentle , hint of nostalgic reverie...the cello has an extremely beautiful, silken sound.
More dreamy - serene music -( it's a somber night...): Gerald Finzi's Eclogue for piano and strings (Peter Donohoe / Northern Sinfonia/Howard Griffiths/Naxos.

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Post by Ralph » Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:24 pm

After dinner tonight I needed a dose of Spohr's chamber music and these quintets are very well performed.

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