What are you listening to?

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Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Mon Nov 21, 2005 9:16 pm

Well, I've had some TORONTO SYMPHONY programs spinning on my trusty walkman:

Schumann's Fourth (Ancerl)
Handel Messiah excs. (MacMillan, w/Marshall, Palmateer, Vickers, Milligan & Toronto Mendelssohn Choir)
Strauss Burleske (Gould/Golschmann)
Bartok's MFSPC, and the Wooden Prince & Miraculous Mandarin Suites (Saraste)
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Fri Nov 25, 2005 6:17 am

Poulenc, Flute Sonata in the Naxos Complete Chamber Music collection.

--harmonically, this beautiful piece reminded me of the music in the contemplative scenes in Dialogues of the Carmelites--
Last edited by jserraglio on Sat Nov 26, 2005 7:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

val
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Post by val » Fri Nov 25, 2005 6:56 am

Charpentier, "Leçons du Vendredi Saint", by Judith Nelson, Rene Jacobs, William Christie.

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Sat Nov 26, 2005 8:10 pm

Once again NAXOS comes through with a new recording of three works by Edmund Rubbra, a composer who might well have wished to be born in an earlier age. His music often incorporates English folk motifs of centuries past.

With the Ulster Orchestra under renowned Rubbra specialist, Takuo Yuasa, this disc features the composer's Improvisation for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 89, Improvisations on Virginal Pieces by Giles Farnaby, Op. 50 and the Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 103. Krysia Osotowicz does a fine job as the soloist in this engaging three-movement work.

Check it out. NAXOS 8.557591.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Nov 27, 2005 3:58 am

<tr><img src="http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0000 ... ZZZZZ_.jpg" width="100" height="100"></tr><tr><div align="left">Kalman, Die Herzogin von Chicago (Bonynge/BRSO, Decca's Entartete Musik series)
American jazz subverts Viennese waltz.
First class music, recording, booklet, graphics, etc. Berkshire offers this for only 6 bucks a disk.
</div></tr>

Abraham Ellstein, Great Songs of the Yiddish Stage (Milken Archive of American Jewish Music)
Stunning!--Naxos has outdone itself with this series.

Huckleberry
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Post by Huckleberry » Sun Nov 27, 2005 1:30 pm

Image

Finzi's Cello Concerto and his Eclogue for piano & strings are two works I'd recommend to anyone who wants to discover Finzi. This Naxos recording is superb.

Marina

Question: Any tips on how to make such images smaller?
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DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Sun Nov 27, 2005 1:58 pm

Howdy, Ishmarina. Glad to bump into you now and then on your watery perambulations. I just picked up the Finzi due to some strong recs on GMG--including one from a fellow I don't know who swears it's better than the Elgar. Well, I didn't think it was that good, but does deserve more listening. (Sometimes I'm slow to make up my mind and really warm to something.)

As part of my on-going 20th Century British discovery program, I've been listening to Bax--this morning the tone poems collected on Lloyd-Jones's Naxos disc. I particularly like Tale the Pine Trees Knew and November Woods. It wasn't easy at first to hear him, because to my late 20th Century ears he sounds like movie music, though in fact it's the other way around: that movie music sounds like Bax (as well as other 20th Century Romantics like Holst). My wife's comment was, "John Williams sure stole a lot from him!"[/i]
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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Huckleberry
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Post by Huckleberry » Sun Nov 27, 2005 2:06 pm

Hello, Dog. Ismarina sure beats Gatorena. :lol:

Yes, it is good to be a doubter. Finzi is not better than Elgar. I'd say that the two of them are comparable. :)

Marina
I finally know what I want to be when I grow up:
Chief Dog Brusher, Music Room Keeper, and Assistant Sunlight Manager
in a hillside Mansion for Ancient Musicians.

Muriel
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Post by Muriel » Sun Nov 27, 2005 2:41 pm

Listening now to Schumann's Gesange der Fruhe ,Op 133.

Barry
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Post by Barry » Sun Nov 27, 2005 3:13 pm

A DVD/video performance of Bruckner's fifth by Wand and the NDRSO. This is a really good performance, especially if you like your Bruckner expansive, as Wand's was in his later years (the performance is from the late 90s). I highly recommend it. The label is TDK.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

val
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Post by val » Mon Nov 28, 2005 4:26 am

Bruno Leonardo Gelber, in Schumann's Carnaval, Schubert's Wanderer Fantasia and a fabulous 3rd Sonata of Chopin.

Volodya
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Post by Volodya » Wed Nov 30, 2005 2:37 pm

Listening to Brahms Complete Quintents played by members of the Berlin Philharmonic Octet. :D

Cyril Ignatius
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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Wed Nov 30, 2005 2:59 pm

Just finished listening to Anton Bruckner's Requiem in D minor, with Hans Michael Beuerle conducting the Laubacher Kantorei and Werner Keltsch Instrumental Ensemble. A nice gentle requiem!
Cyril Ignatius

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:22 pm

Heifetz playing the Sibelius Concerto
Walter Hendl / CSO
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:25 pm

Beethoven's Hammerklavier piano sonata, played by Rudolf Buchbinder--at this moment, the contemplative adagio. On the rare occasions I listen to Buchbinder's LvB recordings, I'm puzzled by their obscurity, for they seem very fine to my admittedly inexpert ear.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

Image

Volodya
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Post by Volodya » Wed Nov 30, 2005 4:52 pm

karlhenning wrote:Heifetz playing the Sibelius Concerto
Walter Hendl / CSO
Absolutely marvellous, Dr. Karl! The Prokofiev VC No. 2 in G minor on the same disc is also magnificently done by Heifetz.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Nov 30, 2005 4:56 pm

Volodya! PM me with your e-mail, please!

Yes, I was telling Gurn . . . I was eyeing this disc at a Washington Street shop when they had a 20% off all classical titles sale a few weeks ago . . . and then I saw you mention it as a disc you were listening to . . . and when I went back to that shop today, they had an even better sale: any three discs (normally priced at $14.99 or less) for $25 . . . so I managed to save $15. Also got Sviatoslav Richer playing some Prokofiev Sonatas, and Isaac Stern playing the Bartok Violin Sonatas.
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Volodya
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Post by Volodya » Wed Nov 30, 2005 6:19 pm

karlhenning wrote:Volodya! PM me with your e-mail, please!

Yes, I was telling Gurn . . . I was eyeing this disc at a Washington Street shop when they had a 20% off all classical titles sale a few weeks ago . . . and then I saw you mention it as a disc you were listening to . . . and when I went back to that shop today, they had an even better sale: any three discs (normally priced at $14.99 or less) for $25 . . . so I managed to save $15. Also got Sviatoslav Richer playing some Prokofiev Sonatas, and Isaac Stern playing the Bartok Violin Sonatas.
I PM'd you, Dr. Karl.

Btw, that's one amazing sale! I took advantage of a Border's promo that allowed me to buy 2, get 1 free. That's how I got the Heifetz CD. I wish they would have had the Richter disc you mentioned. I've still yet to dig into the piano sonatas of Sergei.

Barry
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Post by Barry » Wed Nov 30, 2005 6:21 pm

Volodya wrote:Listening to Brahms Complete Quintents played by members of the Berlin Philharmonic Octet. :D
Love those recordings of the string quintets.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

Volodya
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Post by Volodya » Wed Nov 30, 2005 6:29 pm

Barry Z wrote:
Volodya wrote:Listening to Brahms Complete Quintents played by members of the Berlin Philharmonic Octet. :D
Love those recordings of the string quintets.
Essential listening, IMO, BarryZ. The balance among the musicians is superb. Right now the Piano Quintet is my favorite of the bunch (I really love the intensity found in the third movement), but the Clarinet Quintet would be right behind it. The String Quintets are also sublime.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Nov 30, 2005 8:58 pm

Volodya wrote: I PM'd you, Dr. Karl.
And back to you, mon ami!
Btw, that's one amazing sale!
It is, and I am weighing whether I should go back, and see if they have Isaac Stern playing the Bartok Concerti . . . .

One disc which I nearly made one of my three this afternoon, was an RCA Red Seal reissue of Gunter Wand leading the Schumann Symphpnies Nos. 3 & 4 . . . I heard this at the Museum shop the other night, and they were like fresh, utterly new pieces for me, marvelous!
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Muriel
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Post by Muriel » Wed Nov 30, 2005 9:14 pm

Ninna Nanna an album of Lullabies sung by Montserrat Figueras

DanielFullard
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Post by DanielFullard » Thu Dec 01, 2005 3:27 am

Alwyns breathtaking Harp Concerto......amazing

Muriel
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Post by Muriel » Thu Dec 01, 2005 12:15 pm

Mozart ,Variations,K 360 ,Schiff /Shiokawa.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Thu Dec 01, 2005 12:50 pm

Bartók
Sonata for Violin Solo
Yehudi Menuhin
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

premont
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Post by premont » Thu Dec 01, 2005 4:30 pm

Beethoven: Pianosonatas nr. 2, 13, 14 and 30.

Played by Wilhelm Kempff.

Recorded in the 1930es and part of the incomplete cycle he recorded during a period of some years between the two world wars. This cycle is unavailable at the moment, and I own besides the mentioned only nr. 4, 23, 24 and 26. For the sake of completeness (excuse me) I once thought it necessary to get hold of the "complete" incomplete cycle, but it is not that different from his 1950es mono cycle, which is far superior in every respect, not the least as to recording technique.

Muriel
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Post by Muriel » Thu Dec 01, 2005 7:03 pm

Break Forth ,O Beauteous Heavenly Light ,Bach's Christmas Oratorio ,William Davies at the Organ with the Westminister Brass Ensemble.

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Thu Dec 01, 2005 7:14 pm

Huckleberry wrote: Question: Any tips on how to make such images smaller?
Try this code but make certain to enclose the entire expression in pointed brackets.
For example, < img src="http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/B0 ... ZZZZZZ.jpg" width="160" height="160" >
Use any width and height in pixels you want. No spaces after the opening or before the closing bracket. I put them in to keep the image from printing to the screen, like this:

<img src="http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/B0 ... ZZZZZZ.jpg" width="160" height="160">

jsvajgl
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Post by jsvajgl » Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:43 pm

Arvo Part: Te Deum

I recently stumbled onto the works of Part. I found this recording of 'Te Deum' by the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir and can't stop listening to it. Aside from 'Te Deum,' the album also contains a recording of the 'Berliner Messe.' If you enjoy choral works, I highly recommend it.

miranda
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Post by miranda » Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:48 pm

I love Arvo Part...I still need to get myself a copy of Te Deum.

And Muriel, Montserrat Figuera's recording "Ninna Nanna" is one of my favorite recordings ever. She has a truly gorgeous voice, both sensual and celestial in equal measure.

Right now I am listening to Thomas Zehetmair play Eugene Ysaye's Sonatas for solo violin, op. 27, on the ECM label. Truly inspired playing.

Earlier today, I listened to both discs of Gidon Kremer's recordings of Bach's sonatas and partitas for solo violin, also on the ECM label.....I've really been getting into solo violin music in a big way, lately. Don't quite know why, but I've been enjoying it a great deal.

Barry
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Post by Barry » Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:54 pm

The new Philadelphia Orchestra CD with Eschenbach conducting:

Martinu's Memorial to Lidice
Gideon Klein's (arr. Saudek) Partita for Strings
Bartoks Concerto for Orchestra

All recorded live the past May.

I'm not a Bartok fan and the CfO is no exception, so I'm probably not the best person to judge this recording. It's probably not up there with the great recordings of the piece though. But I'm happy to have the disc for the outstanding performances of the Martinu and Klein pieces. If you like string music, the Klein is a real winner and the great Philadelphia strings really shine in it.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

mahlerfan
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Post by mahlerfan » Fri Dec 02, 2005 2:43 am

Daniel I recall you mentioning that harp concerto on gmg seemingly everyday! :lol: You must have a real obsession there. :D

DanielFullard
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Post by DanielFullard » Fri Dec 02, 2005 3:31 am

mahlerfan wrote:Daniel I recall you mentioning that harp concerto on gmg seemingly everyday! :lol: You must have a real obsession there. :D
As of late I have......The CD I have it on is superb (picture below). The 2nd Symphony is just tremendous and Id advise anyone to get this cd

Image

val
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Post by val » Fri Dec 02, 2005 4:49 am

Shostakovitch, Symphony n. 15 by Kurt Sanderling and the Cleveland Orchestra. One of the best Symphonies of Shostakovitch and a perfect interpretation.

A concerto by the Giardino Armonico with works of Gluck, Locatelli, CPE Bach, WFBach and Boccherini.
They are great in Locatelli's famous Concerto "Il Pianto di Ariana", but CPE Bach's Symphony in B minor, a masterpiece at the level of Haydn's Symphonies of the "Sturm und Drang" period, is played very superficial, very far from Leonhardt or the old version of Ristenpart.

Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Sat Dec 03, 2005 3:31 pm

In preparation for the first snowfall, I listened to three quartets by Arriaga, the "Spanish Mozart," on a new NAXOS disc. Arriaga checked out at age 20 so his output is small but these quartets are beautiful. The quartets are Nos. 1, 2 and 3.

They're performed by the Camerata Boccherini.

NAXOS 8.557628.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sat Dec 03, 2005 4:47 pm

One of the gems of the Naxos catalog: "The Barber of Seville" conducted by Will Humburg with Ramon Vargas as Almaviva and Roberto Servile as Figaro.

Brahms Symphony No. 1 - Haitink/Concertgebouw Orchestra - I admire this recording of one of my favorite works very much.

Beethoven Emperor Concerto - Brendel, Rattle, Vienna Philharmonic
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Dec 04, 2005 5:33 am

<div align="center">Artur Rodzinski and the Cleveland in their 10-disk 75th Anniversary commemorative issue:
Rimsky, Scheherazade
Shostakovich, Symphony #1

Kalman, The Gypsy Princess (Csardasfuerstin) with Bonynge on Naxos

Lloyd Webber, Sunset Boulevard, with Patti LuPone & the London cast </div>

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Dec 04, 2005 6:26 pm

jserraglio wrote:Kalman, The Gypsy Princess (Csardasfuerstin) with Bonynge on Naxos
It's nice to see that someone else here enjoys operetta. I must have more than 30 operetta recordings, many of which are highlight discs but also several complete operettas, plus a couple of videos. Thankfully, my wife also enjoys this form of entertainment so it's not a "guilty pleasure" to be indulged privately as I imagine it might be for some. I hope to attend one of the Austrian festivals some day such as these:

http://www.seefestspiele-moerbisch.at/index.htm

http://www.goldenerochs.at/en-lehar.shtml

or the Wiener Volksoper:

http://www.volksoper.at/Content.Node2/en/

You have listed recordings by the Ohio Light Opera before. May I assume you have attended performances too? I've been in Wooster where they are based - it's an attractive college town. Would you recommend making the effort next summer to see a production?
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Mon Dec 05, 2005 8:03 pm

We're experiencing our first significant snowfall today so I'm marking the event with Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 1 "Winter Reveries" as played by Bernard Haitink and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and a warming glass of Scotch whisky.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Tue Dec 06, 2005 1:28 am

Gilbert & Sullivan, The Sorcerer on Albany/Troy
Haydnseek wrote:
jserraglio wrote:Kalman, The Gypsy Princess (Csardasfuerstin) with Bonynge on Naxos
You have listed recordings by the Ohio Light Opera before. May I assume you have attended performances too? I've been in Wooster where they are based - it's an attractive college town. Would you recommend making the effort next summer to see a production?
I'm pretty new to operetta. I attended my first Ohio Light Opera production this past summer and was greatly impressed--& surprised by all the Europeans in the audience, judging by the languages I heard in the lobby. As on their recordings (most of which I have heard thru library loan), OLO's singing ranges from talented student to solid professional, but the productions and orchestral playing are first-class. Whatever the vocal limitations, they are outweighed by the overall impact of seeing rarely performed works done live on stage in an intimate theater by an unpretentious crew which clearly loves the musical theater. OLO makes a specialty of Kálmán (five recordings!), which suits me just fine--next to Offenbach, he's my current favorite.

I heard Gilbert and Sullivan's The Sorcerer with the gifted singer-actor Ted Christopher in the title role; this production has just been issued by Albany Records, the first one with complete dialogue--ALBANY TROY 814-15.

Opening for the G&S work, was Offenbach's The Island of Tulipatan, completely unknown to me. I was floored by Offenbach's comic genius. As good as The Sorcerer was, The Island of Tulipatan blew it away. I wish they would record that one.

<tr>
<img src="http://www.albanyrecords.com/Merchant2/ ... 814-15.jpg">
</tr>

Gary
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Post by Gary » Tue Dec 06, 2005 4:22 am

jserraglio wrote: I'm pretty new to operetta.
That may be the case, but it seems you've been listening to one new operetta recording per week, if not more. Half of the ones you post on here I've heard of but never actually heard and I've never even heard of the rest! :D

I listened to Kalman's Die Herzogin von Chicago, which arrived on Saturday, today. It's a very Viennese sounding silver-age operetta, sprinkled with American/jazz melodies. Great fun!

Below will link you to a site that lists practically every operetta composer there ever was and his compositions.

http://www.musicaltheatreguide.com/mainmenu.htm
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Tue Dec 06, 2005 10:26 am

Gary wrote:
jserraglio wrote: I'm pretty new to operetta.
That may be the case. . . .
It really is the case. I have the biggies on EMI vinyl (the Walter Legge series) and London but I heard them way back when only as choral/orchestral works, not as living dramas. Seeing stuff live and in English though has got me going, exploring the byways with OLO and then working my way back to the core repertoire. Besides, from what I can tell these "obscure" works have been unfairly neglected, especially the Victor Herbert and Kalman ones that OLO is featuring.

Thanks for the link. Here's a weird one i found.
Victorian and Edwardian Musical Shows
Midi or Karaoke full-length versions of 93 Victorian & Edwardian light operas compiled by Colin M. Johnson from vocal scores. Amazing.
Last edited by jserraglio on Tue Dec 06, 2005 3:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Tue Dec 06, 2005 12:52 pm

Thanks jserraglio for the info on the Ohio Light Opera. I must make an effort to get there.

Quite a few operettas were made into movies in Germany during the 1950's (often with Rudolf Schock) and again in the 1970's but only a very few are currently available (on PAL format DVD) as far as I can determine. An old Unitel production of Lehar's "Das Land des Lächelns" with Rene Kollo came out in the USA recently however under the DG label. Let's hope for more reissues.

Here is a site in German with quite a bit of info, particularly a good list of operetta composers.

http://hometown.aol.de/operette01/home.htm?f=fs
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Gary
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Post by Gary » Tue Dec 06, 2005 6:55 pm

jserraglio wrote:Here's a weird one i found.
Victorian and Edwardian Musical Shows
Thanks for your link.
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Cyril Ignatius
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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Wed Dec 07, 2005 12:44 pm

I'm currently listening to Carl Czerny's Piano Concerto in A Minor, Op. 214, with Felicja Blumental and the Vienna Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Helmuth Froschauer. I discovered this recording not long ago, and it has become a charming favorite.
Cyril Ignatius

DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Wed Dec 07, 2005 12:49 pm

Vänskä and the Lahti Symphony performing Sibelius's Fourth Symphony. If it gets any better than this, I've yet to hear it.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

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Volodya
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Post by Volodya » Wed Dec 07, 2005 3:06 pm

Beethoven Opus 109 played by Christoph Eschenbach. He plays the late piano sonatas with the right touch--firm and in control, but never over the top.

DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Wed Dec 07, 2005 3:35 pm

Now one of those horrifying post-1950 compositions: Korngold's Symphony in F#, Welser-Möst and the Philadelphia Orchestra. No doubt, he's overdue for critical reappraisal. If only his music weren't so tuneful and traditionally tonal, and if only he'd starved in exile from Nazi Austria instead of prospering in Hollywood, he might be better known today.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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DanielFullard
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Post by DanielFullard » Thu Dec 08, 2005 10:13 am

David - Did you listen to that Alywn disc?

BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Thu Dec 08, 2005 10:22 am

Aimard : Ligeti Etudes
Mozart: Quintet K 515

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