What are you listening to?

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Cyril Ignatius
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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Thu Dec 08, 2005 10:32 am

Currently listening to John Field, Nocturnes, Volume 1, Mary Louise Boehm on the piano. Both volumes are very nice.
Cyril Ignatius

DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Thu Dec 08, 2005 11:09 am

DanielFullard wrote:David - Did you listen to that Alywn disc?
Yes, Daniel. It is lovely lyrical music. Alwyn clearly was following his own muse and not the academic herd rushing pell-mell away from a long tradition of tonal beauty. Now that the dust from that stampede is dying down, we are beginning to see a much-needed critical reappraisal of 20th Century composers, like Alwyn, who stood outside the trendy mainstream of fashion. That has kindled my interest in him and contemporaries like Bax and Korngold. The little I heard of their music long ago sounded gauchely retro to my post-Hendrix-and-Stockhausen ears, and it smacked of movie music. Doh! Of course it sounded like movie music. They were the composers who created orchestral movie music in the first place...so movie music sounds like them, not vice versa!

Back to the disc: I preferred the symphonies to the harp concerto. I still have prejudices against the harp as a solo instrument. Perhaps this recording will help me lay them to rest--aided by Segerstam's recording of Rautavaara's Harp Concerto. I look forward to subsequent hearings, for though the general character of the music seemed "merely" pleasant and not profound, I know that's how I first responded to Sibelius and RVW...and it was my first impressions that later proved superficial, not their music. (Not that I suspect he's their equal, but must he be to enjoy him?)

Alwyn will have to wait, however, as yesterday I received the mono Kempff set of Beethoven piano sonatas and am listening to them with great pleasure. Somehow, despite all the recommendations for this set, I did not expect him to be such a poet at the keyboard. It really is very lovely playing. It's easy to hear why Sibelius said, the last time Kempff visited him shortly before he died, that he played Beethoven "not like a pianist, but like a human being." Currently listening to the last disc in the set, with the late sonatas op. 101, 109, 110 (all lovely!) and op. 111 due up shortly.

Incidentally, the piano sound is surprisingly good on most of the tracks I've heard so far, but in some cases the tape hiss seems a bit intrusive. It's not too distracting, however--just a bit surprising after having become accustomed to the low noise floor of most CDs.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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Muriel
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Post by Muriel » Thu Dec 08, 2005 1:24 pm

Ave Maria for seven voices by Philippe Verdelot Tallis Scholars

Volodya
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Post by Volodya » Thu Dec 08, 2005 3:09 pm

Prokofiev Sixth Symphony

(Ozawa conducting the BPO). 8)

Contrary to all the naysayers, its a great performance.

Gary
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Post by Gary » Thu Dec 08, 2005 3:40 pm

Yehudi Menuhin

Mozart-Violin Concerto No. 3 in G, K 216

Orchestre Symphonique de Paris

Georges Enescu conducting

Recorded 1935

Beethoven-Violin Concerto in D, Op. 61

Festival Orchestra Lucerne

Wilhelm Furtwangler conducting

Recorded 1947

Label: CLASSICA D' ORO
Series: Masters of the Violin
CDO 2008
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Thu Dec 08, 2005 3:52 pm

Volodya wrote:Prokofiev Sixth Symphony

(Ozawa conducting the BPO). 8)

Contrary to all the naysayers, it's a great performance.
Sergei Sergeyevich is smiling, Volodya! :-)
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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Volodya
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Post by Volodya » Thu Dec 08, 2005 4:36 pm

karlhenning wrote:
Volodya wrote:Prokofiev Sixth Symphony

(Ozawa conducting the BPO). 8)

Contrary to all the naysayers, it's a great performance.
Sergei Sergeyevich is smiling, Volodya! :-)
Good to make the old guy happy. :D

Now listening to the Complete Trios of Brahms--Opus 8 to be precise--by the Beaux Arts Trio.
The Mighty Five:
1.) Beethoven
2.) Prokofiev
3.) Shostakovich
4.) Brahms
5.) Stravinsky

DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Thu Dec 08, 2005 9:13 pm

Alwyn, Lyra Angelica -- Lloyd-Jones/Royal Liverpool Philharmonic

Second hearing. This is lovely. The inner movements are beautiful, indeed, and the last is quietly exhilarating. This work easily will stand with the finest of English string music by Elgar and Vaughan Williams. I suspect it will become a favorite--especially since this time I had to stop the recording afterwards (rather than go on with the 2nd symphony) in order to savor the music's resonant afterimage. Thanks for the recommendation, Daniel.
Last edited by DavidRoss on Thu Dec 08, 2005 10:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Thu Dec 08, 2005 9:57 pm

Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsodies played by Jeno Jando
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

val
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Post by val » Fri Dec 09, 2005 5:09 am

The legendary Charles Panzéra, singing Lieder from Fauré, Duparc and Schumann's Dichterliebe (with Cortot).

Some moments are unforgettable: Fauré's songs "En Sourdine" and "Vaisseaux nous vous auront aimés", Duparc's "Invitation au voyage" and "La vie antérieure". Regarding Schumann, it is very beautiful but here I prefer a more "german" sensibility (Wunderlich, Fischer Dieskau).

johnQpublic
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Post by johnQpublic » Fri Dec 09, 2005 9:13 am

Saint-Saens - Piano Concerto #4 (Roge/London)
Mackenzie - Burns [Second Scottish Phapsody] (Brabbins/Hyperion)

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Fri Dec 09, 2005 9:39 am

johnQpublic wrote:Saint-Saens - Piano Concerto #4 (Roge/London)
Ah! Those Saint-Saëns piano concerti! I never tire of them!
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Fri Dec 09, 2005 10:20 am

After reminding my ear of some King Crimson which I had not heard for many a year ("The Talking Drum" from Larks' Tongues in Aspic, "Starless" from Red, "The Sheltering Sky" from Discipline) . . . I return to:

Monteverdi
Vespro della Beata Vergine
Boston Baroque / Martin Pearlman
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Fri Dec 09, 2005 8:57 pm

Mozart, G minor Symphony. Bernstein/Boston

Gilbert & Sullivan, Yeomen of the Guard. Ohio Light Opera

Handel, Messiah. Pearlman/Boston Baroque

Mahler, Symphonies 5, 6, 9. Bernstein/New York

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Sat Dec 10, 2005 9:02 pm

Volodya wrote:
karlhenning wrote:
Volodya wrote:Prokofiev Sixth Symphony

(Ozawa conducting the BPO). 8)

Contrary to all the naysayers, it's a great performance.
Sergei Sergeyevich is smiling, Volodya! :-)
Good to make the old guy happy. :D
My turn to listen to this invigorating performance of this fantastic work!

Earlier, I was listening to the Beroff/Masur/Gewandhaus recording of the first three piano concerti.
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sat Dec 10, 2005 10:33 pm

Josef Suk
Chamber Works Vol. 2
Supraphon

Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello in C minor, Op. 2

Elegy for Piano, Violin and Cello, Op. 23

Ensemble: Suk Trio

Quartet for Piano, Violin, Viola and Cello in A minor , Op.1

Musicians:
Jan Panenka - piano
Josef Suk (grandson of the composer) - Violin
Jan Talich - viola
Michaela Fukacova - cello

Quintet for Piano, 2 Violins, Viola and Cello in G minor, Op. 8

Ensemble: Suk Quartet
Pavel Stepan - piano
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Dec 11, 2005 8:01 pm

Beethoven 3rd Symphony - Bernard Haitink, Concertgebouw Orchestra
Beethoven Moonlight Sonata - Alfred Brendel
Chopin Preludes - Claudio Arrau
Waldteufel Waltzes - Alfred Walter, Solvak State Philharmonic
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sun Dec 11, 2005 9:04 pm

Haydnseek wrote: Waldteufel Waltzes - Alfred Walter, Solvak State Philharmonic
What volume is that? I have 5, 6, 7, and 9.
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sun Dec 11, 2005 9:09 pm

Haydn

Symphonies Nos. 6-8--"Le Matin", "Le Midi", "Le Soir"

Northern Chamber Orchestra
Nicholas Ward
Naxos
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Dec 11, 2005 9:17 pm

Gary wrote:
Haydnseek wrote: Waldteufel Waltzes - Alfred Walter, Solvak State Philharmonic
What volume is that? I have 5, 6, 7, and 9.
It's a Naxos release called "Famous Waltzes" selected from the Marco Polo series.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sun Dec 11, 2005 9:35 pm

Haydnseek wrote:
Gary wrote:
Haydnseek wrote: Waldteufel Waltzes - Alfred Walter, Solvak State Philharmonic
What volume is that? I have 5, 6, 7, and 9.
It's a Naxos release called "Famous Waltzes" selected from the Marco Polo series.
I have that one, too. Cheap and excellent recording!
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

val
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Post by val » Mon Dec 12, 2005 3:32 am

Tchaikovsky 2nd and 3rd string Quartets, by the Brodsky Quartet.

The slow mouvement of the 3rd is one of the greatest inspirations of Tchaikovsky.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Mon Dec 12, 2005 9:06 am

Musorgsky/Ravel
Pictures at an Exhibition
Muti / Phila
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Cyril Ignatius
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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Mon Dec 12, 2005 2:35 pm

Ravel - Daphnis and Chloe, complete ballet score, with Charles Dutoit and the Montreal Symphony.

Nicolai Ghiaurov - Russian Arias, with Edward Downes and the LSO

Mozart, Piano Concerto # 23 Wilhelm Kempff, piano, with the Bamberger Symphony and Ferdinand Leitner.
Cyril Ignatius

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
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Post by Ralph » Mon Dec 12, 2005 3:09 pm

Just listened to Bernstein's Beethoven 9th celebrating the fall of the Berlin Wall with musicians from a number of orchestras.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

Gary
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Post by Gary » Mon Dec 12, 2005 6:56 pm

Ralph wrote:Just listened to Bernstein's Beethoven 9th celebrating the fall of the Berlin Wall with musicians from a number of orchestras.
Listening to the same one now.
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

Barry
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Post by Barry » Mon Dec 12, 2005 7:02 pm

Gary wrote:
Ralph wrote:Just listened to Bernstein's Beethoven 9th celebrating the fall of the Berlin Wall with musicians from a number of orchestras.
Listening to the same one now.
I have the video, but haven't watched it in years. I recall liking the performance (more than his VPO recording on DG), but finding it difficult to watch because of the obvious pain Lenny was in just months before he passed away.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

Gary
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Post by Gary » Tue Dec 13, 2005 12:33 am

The RCA Victor vocal series 7911-2-RG

Marian Anderson

Matthäuspassion (St. Matthew Passion), BWV 244 Erbarme dich
Johann Sebastian Bach

Messiah, oratorio, HWV 56 He Shall Feed His Flock
George Frideric Handel

Ellens Gesang III ("Ave Maria"), song for voice & piano, D. 839 (Op. 52/6)
Franz Schubert

Die schöne Müllerin, song cycle, for voice & piano, D. 795 (Op. 25) Wohin
Franz Schubert

Der Tod und das Mädchen ("Vorüber, ach vorüber"), song for voice & piano, D. 531 (Op. 7/3)
Franz Schubert

Songs (12) for voice & piano, Op. 35 Stille Tränen, No.10
Robert Schumann

Myrthen, 26 songs for voice & piano, Op. 25 Der Nussbaum, No.3
Robert Schumann

Alto Rhapsody, for alto, male chorus & orchestra, Op. 53
Johannes Brahms

Songs (5) for voice & piano, Op. 105 No.2 Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer
Johannes Brahms

Morgen ("Und morgen wird die Sonne wieder scheinen"), song for voice & piano (or orchestra), Op. 27/4 No.4 Morgen
Richard Strauss

In the silence of the secret night, song for voice & piano, Op. 4/3 In the Silence of the Secret Night Op 04 No.3
Sergey Rachmaninov

Un ballo in maschera, opera Re dell'abisso affrettati
Giuseppe Verdi

Spirituals

Go Down Moses
Anonymous

Crucifixion
Anonymous

My Lord, What A Morning for voice & piano
Anonymous
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Tue Dec 13, 2005 4:34 pm

Barry Z wrote:I have the video, but haven't watched it in years. I recall liking the performance (more than his VPO recording on DG), but finding it difficult to watch because of the obvious pain Lenny was in just months before he passed away.
I just watched the Bernstein Harvard Norton Lectures DVDs (LB in his prime) and was mesmerized by his impersonations of a college professor. This guy was a born teacher and a genius to boot. But every time he lit up a cigarette on camera, I was devastated. Otherwise he might still be alive and active today. What a loss.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Dec 13, 2005 5:17 pm

Liszt
Hungarian Fantasy, S.123
Cziffra, père et fils
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

miranda
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Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2005 5:13 pm

Post by miranda » Tue Dec 13, 2005 9:30 pm

Palestrina--Missa Dum complerentur, Veni Sancte Spiritus and other music for Whitsuntide; Westminster Cathedral Choir, dir. by Martin Baker....on the Hyperion label.

maskedman
Posts: 147
Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: INDIAN WELLS CA.

WHAT ARE Y OU LISTENING TO..

Post by maskedman » Tue Dec 13, 2005 11:02 pm

[b][size=18][/size]


SHOSTAKOVICH STRING QUARTETS 11-15 BORODIN.....[/b]

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Tue Dec 13, 2005 11:06 pm

I'm, sorry, I know it's lame, but I just gotta ask - who was that masked man?

maskedman
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Post by maskedman » Tue Dec 13, 2005 11:14 pm

[quote="Brendan"]I'm, sorry, I know it's lame, but I just gotta ask - who was that masked man?[/quote]

ask that indian standing by the jukebox

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Tue Dec 13, 2005 11:25 pm

Queue William Tell overture. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Gary
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Post by Gary » Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:56 pm

Nathan Milstein

Georges Pludermacher piano

The Last Recital
Teldec

1. Sonata for violin & piano No. 9 in A major ("Kreutzer") Op. 47
Ludwig van Beethoven

2. Partita for solo violin No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004 No. 5 Chaconne
Johann Sebastian Bach

3. Violin Sonata in A major, Op.1/3, HWV 361
George Frideric Handel

4. Sonata for solo violin No. 3 in C major, BWV 1005 Nr. 3 Allegro assai
Johann Sebastian Bach

5. Introduction and Tarantella, for violin & orchestra, Op 43 Moderato. Allegro vivace
Pablo de Sarasate

6. Tales of an Old Grandmother, for piano, Op. 31 No. 2 Andantino
Sergey Prokofiev

7. Tales of an Old Grandmother, for piano, Op. 31 No. 3 Andante assai
Sergey Prokofiev

8. Mazeppa, opera Act 3: Maria's aria, Andante non tanto
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky

9. Caprice for violin solo in B flat major "The Devil's Chuckle," Op. 1/13
Niccolo Paganini

10. Consolation, for piano No. 3 in D-flat Major "Lento placido", S. 172/3 (LW A111a/2/2)
Franz Liszt
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

val
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Post by val » Thu Dec 15, 2005 2:35 am

Mozart: Le nozze di Figaro, directed by Karl Böhm with Janowitz, Prey, Troyanos. Fabulous.

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sat Dec 17, 2005 9:51 pm

Liszt. Piano Concertos and Totentanz. Zimerman/Ozawa/BSO . . . a beautiful recording

Rachmaninoff/Tchaikovsky. Piano Concertos. Richter/Wislocki & Karajan/BPO on DG

The Stravinsky/Wuorinen DG disk with Knussen/London Sinfonietta recommended by Karl Henning elsewhere on this site.

Sondheim. Into the Woods on RCA

Ginastera/Paganini. Violin Concertos. Ricci/Herrera de la Fuente on One-Eleven

Wallingford
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Post by Wallingford » Sun Dec 18, 2005 5:05 pm

Petrushka--as done by Dorati/Minnesota. Y'KNOW--between this & their Scheherazade, I'm convinced Dorati's 1950s Minneapolis Symphony had the CORNER on Russian barnburners......I'm gonna work on their complete Nutcracker one of these nights (first complete recording ever, I believe).
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Dec 18, 2005 8:14 pm

My plan to enjoy an opera this weekend was thwarted somehow. We listened to Christmas music mostly but also an album of the great Richard Tauber singing operetta tunes. I managed to find the time to listen two of Wynton Marsalis's large scale works: "Big Train" - an Ellingtonesque composition written for the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra and the "Marsiac Suite," a graceful, happy work for a septet that is one of the best things I've heard by Marsalis.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Thu Dec 22, 2005 3:21 am

<div align="center">Image
Hilary Hahn playing concertos by . . .

Elgar, Vaughan Williams, Bach, Mendelssohn and Shostakovich
</div>

12tone
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Post by 12tone » Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:03 am

jserraglio wrote:<div align="center">Image
Hilary Hahn playing concertos by . . .

Elgar, Vaughan Williams, Bach, Mendelssohn and Shostakovich
</div>
Is that an old picture Hahn drew when she was a girl?

david johnson
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Post by david johnson » Thu Dec 22, 2005 5:14 am

scriabin: sym 3/semkov,warsaw nat'l philharmonic/stolat lp

dj

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Fri Dec 23, 2005 7:10 am

12tone wrote:Is that an old picture Hahn drew when she was a girl?
Hilary was very busy practicing back then. It was sent to Hahn by a kid named Annika who likes violin music.

Currently listening to . . .

Brahms, Symphonies Nos. 2 and 3 (in Sony's Bruno Walter Edition)

Bax, Spring Fire Symphony
(Handley on Chandos)
Last edited by jserraglio on Sun Dec 25, 2005 8:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sun Dec 25, 2005 12:31 am

Tchaikovsky

The Nutcracker

Gergiev/Kirov Orchestra

Philips

Emile Waldteufel Vol. 6

Alfred Walter/Slovak State Philarmonic Orchestra (Kosice)

Marco Polo

Leory Anderson: Greatest Hits

Arthur Fiedler/Boston Pops Orchestra

RCA Victor/BMG
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

jserraglio
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Post by jserraglio » Sun Dec 25, 2005 7:54 am

Hilary Hahn, violin, in concertos by Beethoven, Brahms and Stravinsky, Bernstein's Serenade, and Bach's Sonatas and Partitas.

CharmNewton
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Post by CharmNewton » Mon Dec 26, 2005 11:31 pm

Taking a break from Christmas music both popular and classical (Marriner's Argo Messiah) and the Third Christmas Mass (DG Musikfest CD). Now listening to the Heifetz Rediscovered CD, which is made up of previously unreleased (and unapproved by the artist) sides dating from 1922-36. There are two major works on this disc, the Grieg Sonata No. 3, Op. 45 and the Brahms Sonata No. 1, Op. 78. Both of these are beautiful recordings, but Heifetz wasn't interested in having them released. This issue was produced with the assistance of his son and his estate. Transfers, by Jon Samuels, are excellent. Heifetz's tempi are brisker than we hear now and his phrasing projects a simplicity and clarity in both of these works that is refreshing. This is not superficial music-making. An enjoyable disc for lovers of this music or the violin.

John

Werner
CMG's Elder Statesman
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Post by Werner » Mon Dec 26, 2005 11:43 pm

Not unimportant in the Grieg and Brahms sontas: Who was the pianist?
Werner Isler

CharmNewton
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Post by CharmNewton » Tue Dec 27, 2005 12:04 am

Werner wrote:Not unimportant in the Grieg and Brahms sontas: Who was the pianist?
Emanuel Bay in both works. The Grieg dates from February 3, 1936 and the Brahms from February 13, 1936. All sides were taken from first or second takes, so it would seen Heifetz was perhaps OK with the recordings at the time (although how many Heifetz recordings had a take 4 or 5?). Reservations may have to do with recorded sound. I think the recording is nicely balanced between the piano and the violin, but Heifetz's recordings are usually more brilliant than what is heard here.

John

david johnson
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Post by david johnson » Tue Dec 27, 2005 4:07 am

beethoven #7, kleiber/vpo

dj

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