What are you listening to?

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Thomas J
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What are you listening to?

Post by Thomas J » Mon May 02, 2005 5:44 pm

Hi ladies and gentlemen. I haven't been around here in a good while. Werner encouraged me to drop by, so here I am. I see you guys don't have a listening thread already started. So in an attempt to get some cheap posts, I'll attempt to get the ball rolling and the rest is obviously up to you.

Haydn - Cello Concertos #1 & 2, Rostropovich and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields

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Post by Werner » Mon May 02, 2005 5:51 pm

And it's great to see you here again, Thomas. You know you're always welcome.

What a coincidence that you mention Rostropovich. If you'll check the Concert Review thread, - maybe you have already - you'll see that several of us heard him - and pianist Martha Argerich at the Philharmonic last week. It was a great concert.

Youmay remember some comments here over the years that deprecated his tenure as conductor of the National Symphony. I can't comment on that, but at least when he deals with repertoire that's close to him he's way up there. And at 78, he's till got all the pep he needs. It keeps you aware of the thrillof live performances.
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Post by Ralph » Mon May 02, 2005 5:53 pm

Welcome back, Thomas. Hope all is well. I enjoyed our CD hunting on your visit-please come to the Big Apple again (with money, of course).

Listening right now to the new Rattle/Mahler 8th. Before Brahms First Symphony on the LPO house label with Sir Colin Davis conducting.
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Post by Febnyc » Mon May 02, 2005 6:15 pm

A new disc (or so Sony says - although recorded in 2001) of Emanuel Ax and Yefim Bronfman performing a couple of works for two pianos by Brahms.

The first, Sonata in F Minor for Two Pianos, Op.34b, actually was later, in a new version, to become the Piano Quintet in F Minor. The two-piano version is great to hear, and that distinctive opening, with the descending theme, is striking without the string sound.

The other piece is the Variations on a Theme of Haydn. Taken, of course, by Brahms from his orchestral score, it was the last large-scale keyboard work that Brahms wrote. Ax and Bronfman give the music a really rich orchestral timbre.

Nice CD.

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Post by Ralph » Mon May 02, 2005 6:45 pm

An exciting new TELARC release is my listening right now - Erich Kunzel, the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra with the Mormon Tubercular Choir performing Miklos Roza's choral suites for "Ben-Hur," "Quo Vadis" and "King of Kings." An hour of really thrilling music by a master filmscorer. All three films are outstanding. These suites are powerful by themselves.

TELARC 80631
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Post by Thomas J » Mon May 02, 2005 6:51 pm

Thanks for the warm welcome guys. I'll try not to be a stranger. Ralph, I look forward to reconnecting in the near future. I had a great time hanging out with you. Continue on...

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Post by Barry » Mon May 02, 2005 7:08 pm

Pick-ups from my recent trip out west:

Schumann symphonies: Barenboim/Berlin Staatskapelle Outstanding....Barenboim gets a wonderfully spread sound. This is not for those who like lean, more transparent, sharp-edged Schumann. But for those like me, who feel that this is the sort of orchestral texture that is best suited to this music, it's wonderful to hear a conductor other than Sawallisch who is clearly an expert at getting this type of sound. Even if recording costs weren't an issue (which they obviously are in terms of determing which orchestra Barenboim was to record the cycle with, as well as his Beethoven cycle), I think a less in-your-face orchestra like the Berlin Staatskapelle is better suited for this type of approach to Schumann than the CSO is.

Mendelssohn symphonies: Sawallisch/New Philharmonia
I was happy to find this out of print set. It's a very solid cycle on the whole with no real weak performances and a spectacular Italian. That really surprised me. I would have expected to like Sawallisch's third more than his fourth; but it turned out to be the reverse. This Italian is in the same class as his great Schumann recordings.

Wagner's The Ring: Without Words: Maazel/Berlin Philharmonic
While I'm not an opera fan in general, I love listening to orchestral highlights of Wagner's operas. This is a great disc, highly recommendable to those interested in Ring orchestral highlights. This is the best of the admittedly few Maazel discs I've heard over the years.

Atterburg's ninth symphony: Rasilainen
I should have looked more closely before picking up this disc. I only had Atterburg's second symphony and like it enough to want to try another disc. I couldn't remember which one I had exactly, but knew it wasn't the ninth. So I grabbed that one. It's more like a song cycle than a symphony; not really my cup of tea (as is the case with the Shostakovich 14.......and I'm a big Shosty fan), although there are a few great moments. I'm not done with Atterburg though. I'll keep an eye out for his discs at used stores and on Ebay.
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Post by MaestroDJS » Mon May 02, 2005 7:27 pm

During the weekend I played all of my Max Reger recordings. He composed in almost every genre except opera, and in a short lifespan of 43 years produced works totaling 146 opus numbers along with arrangements of compositions by other composers. Reger's influence spread also to the theoretical side of music. His Beiträge zur Modulationslehr (Theory of Modulation, 1903) provided theoretical justification for the most extended chromatic modulations. In fact, Reger was one of the most highly-regarded composers by members of the 2nd Viennese School, who looked upon Reger's music as being a necessary stage in the evolution of Western harmonic thinking which ultimately ended with 12-tone (dodecaphonic) composition. Reger was the most often-performed composer in the concerts of Arnold Schönberg's "Society for the Private Performance of Music"; the 2nd most often-performed was Claude Debussy.

Although Reger's music was widely admired during his lifetime, the composer had many severe critics, most of whom objected to the constant modulatory nature of the music and the very dense contrapuntal writing, especially in the organ music. This is what I like most about his music, plus his blend of Baroque, Classical and Romantic forms. Some music critics tried to provoke a musical rivalry between Reger and Richard Strauss. Like the Brahms-Wagner rivalry, Reger wrote primarily absolute music, whereas Strauss' greatest successes came from program music. However this attempt to provoke a rivalry failed because the 2 composers held each other in very high regard. Reger's numerous great and deeply-felt (and extraordinarily difficult to perform) organ works remain today at the high point of post-Bach organ literature.

Anyway, this is what I heard last weekend, mostly on vintage LPs which I bought during various trips to Germany in the 1990s and supplemented elsewhere. Yes, I had a major Reger hangover afterward, but what a way to go! :D

Max Reger (1873-1916), Germany:

Cello Sonatas: No. 1 in G Minor, No. 3 in A Minor. Hans-Georg Jaraslawski, Cello; Ulrich Urban, Piano. Ambitus AMB 68 803 (Germany).

Eine Ballett-Suite für Orchester; Eine romantische Suite nach Gedichten von Eichendorf. Nürnberger Sinfonie-Orchester / Werner Andreas Albert. Colosseum SM 575 (Germany).

Klarinettequintett. Rudolf Gall, Klarinette. Das Keller-Quartet. Da Camera Magna SM 92702 (Germany).

Konzert im alten Stil; Suite im alten Stil. Nürnberger Sinfonie-Orchester / Günter Neidlinger. Colosseum SM 542 (Germany).

Lateinisches Requiem; Dies Irae. Yoko Kawahara, Soprano; Marga Höffgen, Alto; Hans-Dieter Bader, Tenor; Nikolaus Hillebrand, Bass; Chor und Sinfonieorchester des NDR / Roland Bader. Koch Schwann AMS 3527 (Germany).

Eine Lustspiel-Ouvertüre. Louisville Orchestra / Jorge Mester. Louisville LS-734 (United States). (+ Bizet: Variations chromatiques (orch. Weingartner); Moszkowski: Suite No. 3; Napravnik: Festive March.)

Organ music. Introduction and Passacaglia in D Minor; Ave Maria in D-Flat Major; Variations and Fugue (English National Anthem); Fantasia and Fugue in D Minor; Benedictus; Sonata No. 2 in D Minor; Fantasia and Fugue on the Name of BACH; 6 Chorales; Fantasia on the Chorale "Wie schön leuchtet uns der Morgenstern"; Pastorale; 5 Pieces; Fantasia on the Chorale "Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"; Variations and Fugue on an Original Theme in F-Sharp Minor; Fantasia on the Chorale "Straf' mich nicht in deinem Zorn"; 6 Chorales; Scherzo in D Minor; Fantasia on the Chorale "Halleluja! Gott zu Loben. Bleibe meine Seelen freud"; Toccata and Fugue in D Major; Fantasia on the Chorale "Wachet auf, Ruft uns die Stimme"; Introduction and Passacaglia in F Minor; Intermezzo in D Major; Rhapsody in C-Sharp Minor; Symphonic Fantasia and Fugue in D Minor. Fernando Germani, Organ (Recorded 1967, 1968). Fonit Cetra LAR 40 (6 LPs) (Italy).

Organ Music. Phantasie über den Choral "Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"; Kyrie Eleison; Phantasie über den Choral "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme"; Choralvorspiele: Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, Valet will ich dir geben, Jesus, meine zuversicht, Meinem Jesu laß ich nicht, O Gott, du frommer Gott. Heinz Wunderlich, Organ. Arp-Schnitger ASR 24 (Germany).

Piano Concerto in F Minor. Rudolf Serkin, Piano; Philadelphia Orchestra / Eugene Ormandy (Recorded March 1959). CBS 61711 (Germany).

Piano Music. Silhouette in D Major; Humoresque in G Minor; Aus meinem Tagebuch[i]. Max Reger, Piano (piano rolls, 1905). The Welte Legacy of Piano Treasures 678 (United States). (+ Fauré: Barcarolle in A Minor, Pavanne in F-Sharp Minor; Mahler: Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen: Ging heute Morgen übers Feld, Symphony No. 5 in C-Sharp Minor: I-Trauermarsch, Symphony No. 4 in G Major: IV-Das himmlische Leben.)

Romanzen für Violine und Orchester: No. 1 in G Major, No. 2 in D Major, No. 3 in G Major; Suite für Violine und Orchester. Hans Maile, Violin; Radio-Sinfonie-Orchester Berlin / Uros Lajovic. Koch Schwann VMS 1607 F (Germany).

Symphonischer Prolog zu einer Tragödie. Radio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin / Gerd Albrecht. Koch Schwann VMS 1605 (Germany).

Vier Tondichtungen nach Arnold Böcklin. Nürnberger Sinfonie-Orchester / Erich Kloss. Choralvorspiel "Lobe den Herren"; Canzone in E-Flat Major; Pastorale in F Major; Toccata in D Minor; Benedictus in D-Flat Major; Introduction and Passacaglia in D Minor. Rudolf Zartner, Organ. Colosseum SM 511 (Germany).

Variationen und Fuge über ein Thema von Bach. Rudolf Serkin, Piano. CBS IM 39562 (United States). (+ Haydn: Piano Sonata in C Major.)

Variationen und Fuge über ein Thema von Beethoven. Nürnberger Sinfonie-Orchester / Erich Kloss. Colosseum SM 512 (Germany). (+ R. Strauss: Burleske in D Minor for piano and orchestra.)

Variationen und Fuge über ein lustiges Thema von Johann Adam Hiller*; Variationen und Fuge über ein Thema von Mozart; Eine Ballett-Suite für Orchester. *Philharmonisches Staatsorchester Hamburg, Bamberger Sinfonie-Orchester / Joseph Keilberth. Telefunken 6.35053 (2 LPs) (Germany).

Variationen und Fuge über ein lustiges Thema von Johann Adam Hiller; Eine Ballett-Suite für Orchester. Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks / Sir Colin Davis. Orfeo S 090 841 A (Germany).

Variationen und Fuge über ein lustiges Thema von Johann Adam Hiller; Vier Tondichtungen nach Arnold Böcklin. Koninglijke Concertgebouw-Orkest Amsterdam / Neeme Järvi. Chandos ABRD 1426 (United Kingdom).

Variationen und Fuge über ein Thema von Telemann. Jorge Bolet, Piano. London CS 7197 (United States). (+ Brahms: Variationen und Fuge über ein Thema von Händel.)

Violin Concerto in A Major. Yuuko Shiokawa, Violin; Nürnberger Sinfonie-Orchester / Erich Kloss. Colosseum SM 514 (Germany).

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Elsa & Max Reger in 1902

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Post by Harold Tucker » Mon May 02, 2005 7:36 pm

Ralph,
Please don't let Mel find out that Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops played their Rozsa in Cincinnati while the Mormon Abertwacle Choir was singing in Salt Lake City. You know how much that sort of thing upsets him.

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Post by Ralph » Mon May 02, 2005 9:30 pm

Harold Tucker wrote:Ralph,
Please don't let Mel find out that Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops played their Rozsa in Cincinnati while the Mormon Abertwacle Choir was singing in Salt Lake City. You know how much that sort of thing upsets him.
*****

Okay.
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Post by karlhenning » Tue May 03, 2005 6:41 am

My "normal listening" gets much curtailed when I am hot in pursuit of the closing double-bar of a piece of my own ... so I have been listening to a very-nearly-finished brass quintet (2 flugelhorns, horn, trombone, tuba) called Moonrise. Looks like it will run about 14 minutes, total.

(On the other hand, since I spend a goodish percentage of my time composing, maybe that's my "normal listening" ....)
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Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Tue May 03, 2005 6:57 am

Starting the morning with the Atlanta Symphony's Beethoven Ninth, a very good TELARC release. Aftere that I might go to work.
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Post by Haydnseek » Tue May 03, 2005 7:29 am

Finally replaced my busted turntable so I can listen to LPs I haven’t heard in some time, lately including:

Beethoven: Second Piano Concerto and Choral Fantasy – Alfred Brendel, Haitink, London Philharmonic
Beethoven: Symphonies 7 and 8 – Bernstein, Vienna Philharmonic
Strauss: Metamorphosen – Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic
Mozart: Symphony No. 36 – Krips, Concertgebouw Orchestra

On CD:

Mozart: The Marriage of Figaro – Bernard Haitink and Co.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

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Post by Ralph » Tue May 03, 2005 7:32 am

Now it's time for a BMG release of Copland conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas, a true Coplander. Appalachian Spring is a couple of hundred miles from Gotham but the spirit is here this cool, sunny AM.
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Post by MaestroDJS » Tue May 03, 2005 8:00 pm

karlhenning wrote:My "normal listening" gets much curtailed when I am hot in pursuit of the closing double-bar of a piece of my own ... so I have been listening to a very-nearly-finished brass quintet (2 flugelhorns, horn, trombone, tuba) called Moonrise. Looks like it will run about 14 minutes, total.

(On the other hand, since I spend a goodish percentage of my time composing, maybe that's my "normal listening" ....)
Agreed. Half the time, the music I hear is the music I happen to be composing. Wow, sure saves me money on CDs!

Dave

Excuse me, is the music in my head too loud for you?

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Post by Ralph » Tue May 03, 2005 9:20 pm

Tonight after class Sibelius 2,5 and 7 with Sir Colin Davis conducting on BMG. Sibelius was just what I needed.
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Post by Jackie Vilela » Wed May 04, 2005 3:23 am

La Traviata with Angela Gheorghiu
E avanti a lui, tremava tutta Roma!
Tosca

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Post by GK » Wed May 04, 2005 5:19 am

All or part of some of the BBC CDs I got recently:

Schubert--String Quintet in C, Vellinger Qt.+Bernard Greenkouse
Mozart--Wind Serenade K361, Halstead, Orch. of Age of Enlightenment
Mozart--Violin Sonata K526, Pauk & Frankl (CD includes K454 & K379)
Dvorak--Dumsky Trio, Pauk, Kirshbaum, Frankl (CD includes Beethoven "Ghost")

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Post by Ralph » Wed May 04, 2005 5:34 am

Leisurely breakfast with chamber works by Dittersdorf this morning. Just what I need before the next to final day of the spring semester.
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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed May 04, 2005 8:47 am

Brahms- and Tchaikovsky-fest on XM because of their shared birthday Saturday. Thank god they aren't playing the warhorses.
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Post by karlhenning » Wed May 04, 2005 9:06 am

OTOH, so many of their works are so deservedly popular, one might almost designate their entire oeuvre as 'war-horse' :-)

Cheers,
~Karl
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Post by Thomas J » Wed May 04, 2005 7:14 pm

Chopin - Ballades, Scherzos, Tarantelle, Arthur Rubinstein

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Post by Ralph » Wed May 04, 2005 7:35 pm

"Carmen" with the incomparable Victoria de los Angeles.
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Post by GK » Wed May 04, 2005 8:28 pm

Music for clarinet and piano by Brahms, Vaughn Williams, and Milhaud featuring clarinetist Jonathan Cohler.

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Post by Ralph » Wed May 04, 2005 9:08 pm

For late night reading several Mendelssohn string quartets on a new Emerson Quartet release.
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Post by Dana » Wed May 04, 2005 9:25 pm

Ralph wrote:Starting the morning with the Atlanta Symphony's Beethoven Ninth, a very good TELARC release. Aftere that I might go to work.
I'm always on the lookout for another 9th, how does this interpretation compare to others?

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Post by Ralph » Thu May 05, 2005 5:02 am

Dana wrote:
Ralph wrote:Starting the morning with the Atlanta Symphony's Beethoven Ninth, a very good TELARC release. Aftere that I might go to work.
I'm always on the lookout for another 9th, how does this interpretation compare to others?
*****

Well there are sooo many Beethoven 9ths. I bought this CD a few weeks ago on the recommendation of a friend who is very knowledgeable. I like it a lot. The choral part is especially strong.

It's available in two formats, regular CD and SACD.

Have you heard any of the Beethoven performances by Zinman on ARTE NOVA?
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Post by Dana » Thu May 05, 2005 6:03 am

Ralph wrote:
Dana wrote:
Ralph wrote:Starting the morning with the Atlanta Symphony's Beethoven Ninth, a very good TELARC release. Aftere that I might go to work.
I'm always on the lookout for another 9th, how does this interpretation compare to others?
*****

Well there are sooo many Beethoven 9ths. I bought this CD a few weeks ago on the recommendation of a friend who is very knowledgeable. I like it a lot. The choral part is especially strong.

It's available in two formats, regular CD and SACD.

Have you heard any of the Beethoven performances by Zinman on ARTE NOVA?
No, my 9ths are Ormandy, Karajan, and 2 Furtwanglers (Bayrueth '54, and Hitler's birthday in '42, in what has been dubbed at GMG as the Hitler recording). I like the '42 the best, the solo quartet is just gorgeous. I'm thinking of getting rid of the Karajan. It was my first 9th, and I thought I should keep it just because it is such a good performance, but I just don't enjoy Karajan at all.


Listening to Tchaikovsky 4th Symphony, Ormandy & the Philly O on Sony
Be away for a while - computer problems, then camp, then college - Expect me back when the bell tolls one!!!

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Post by MaestroDJS » Thu May 05, 2005 7:06 am

Presently listening to the lovely Harp Concerto in C Major by François-Adrien Boieldieu (1775-1834), who was the chief composer of French opera in the first quarter of the 19th Century. Although his Harp Concerto seems to be his most popular work nowadays, his opera overtures are still sometimes heard, such as Le calife de Bagdad (The Calif of Baghdad) and La dame blanche (The White Lady). [Marie-Claire Jamet, Harp; Orchestre de Chambre Paul Kuentz]

Now moving on to the equally beautiful but very different Harp Concerto by Reinhold Glière. Whereas the Boieldieu concerto is delicately poised, the Glière concerto is full-blooded and romantic. [Ossian Ellis, Harp; London Symphony Orchestra / Richard Bonynge]

Half an hour later....

It sure is interesting how one thing leads to another. After the Harp Concerti of Boeildieu and Glière, I've selected the ballet Orpheus (1948) by Igor Stravinsky due to its prominent harp part. Orpheus is subdued and reflective almost throughout, and it is one of the most beautiful pieces of its time. Orpheus's lyre is portrayed by the harp. One of its most lyrical sections is the central Air de Danse for two oboes and harp solo, with solo and full strings. There is a loud but brief outburst near the end of the ballet, which is followed by a reprise of the hushed, soft, radiant, gorgeous, shimmering music heard at the beginning. [Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky]

Next in my rotation is another Stravinsky ballet. Apollo (1928) is scored for string orchestra and it has an austere beauty not unlike ancient Greek scultures. Stravinsky himself referred to it as his "ballet blanc", because the translucence of the string orchestra shimmers like a fine black-and-white photograph. [Columbia Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky]

Dave

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Post by Haydnseek » Thu May 05, 2005 7:55 am

MaestroDJS wrote:...I've selected the ballet Orpheus (1948) by Igor Stravinsky due to its prominent harp part. Orpheus is subdued and reflective almost throughout, and it is one of the most beautiful pieces of its time. Orpheus's lyre is portrayed by the harp. One of its most lyrical sections is the central Air de Danse for two oboes and harp solo, with solo and full strings. There is a loud but brief outburst near the end of the ballet, which is followed by a reprise of the hushed, soft, radiant, gorgeous, shimmering music heard at the beginning. [Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky]

Next in my rotation is another Stravinsky ballet. Apollo (1928) is scored for string orchestra and it has an austere beauty not unlike ancient Greek scultures. Stravinsky himself referred to it as his "ballet blanc", because the translucence of the string orchestra shimmers like a fine black-and-white photograph. [Columbia Symphony Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky]
I love both those pieces. Stravinsky produced much wonderful music in his "Neo-classical" period. Have you listened to the Danses concertantes of 1942 lately? Or the Scènes de Ballet of 1944?
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Post by FrankAderholdt » Thu May 05, 2005 8:06 am

Ralph wrote:An exciting new TELARC release is my listening right now - Erich Kunzel, the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra with the Mormon Tubercular Choir performing Miklos Roza's choral suites for "Ben-Hur," "Quo Vadis" and "King of Kings." An hour of really thrilling music by a master filmscorer. All three films are outstanding. These suites are powerful by themselves.

TELARC 80631
Goody! I read the review article about this recording in Fanfare magazine. Can't wait to get it.

The "love theme" from Ben-Hur is on my Top Ten list of great melodies. Every time I hear it I cry-literally (no kidding). I hope it's prominent on the new CD.

At this moment I'm listening to CD 4 in the 5-disc set of chamber music and orchestral works by Janacek (Decca, recorded 1970-1997). The first movement of the Sinfonietta brings back great memories from my childhood. I remember an old LP of the Czech Philharmonic (don't recall the conductor) that included the Sinfonietta and Taras Bulba. I had never heard such orchestral colors! What exotic sounds! I'm still blown away by the brass writing in the Sinfonietta.
"Next to the Word of God, music deserves the highest praise." -- Martin Luther (1483-1546)

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Post by MaestroDJS » Thu May 05, 2005 2:07 pm

Haydnseek wrote:I love both those pieces. Stravinsky produced much wonderful music in his "Neo-classical" period. Have you listened to the Danses concertantes of 1942 lately? Or the Scènes de Ballet of 1944?
Yes those are great works. I have the complete Igor Stravinsky: The Recorded Legacy (22 CDs, Sony Classical SX22K 46 290). This contains almost all of Stravinsky's stereo recordings as conductor, and many of his mono recordings as well.

This is an interesting supplement, and it's in stereo too:

Stravinsky in Moscow 1962. Pétrouchka Suite; Orpheus*; Ode*; Fireworks; Ey ukhnyem (Song of the Volga Boatmen)*. Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra; *USSR Philharmonic Orchestra / Igor Stravinsky. (Recorded September & Orctober 1962). BMG Classics 74321 33220 2 (2 CDs)
FrankAderholdt wrote:I remember an old LP of the Czech Philharmonic (don't recall the conductor) that included the Sinfonietta and Taras Bulba. I had never heard such orchestral colors! What exotic sounds! I'm still blown away by the brass writing in the Sinfonietta.
Might this be it? Fantastic performances.

Sinfonietta; Taras Bulba. Czech Philharmonic Orchestra / Karel Ancerl. Supraphon 50 380 (Czechoslovakia).

Dave

David Stybr, Engineer and Composer: It's Left Brain vs. Right Brain: best 2 falls out of 3
http://members.SibeliusMusic.com/Stybr

Coordinator, Classical Music SIG (Special Interest Group) of American Mensa

Life and Afterlife: Four Elegies for Soprano and Orchestra
http://www.SibeliusMusic.com/cgi-bin/sh ... reid=57666

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Post by Wallingford » Fri May 06, 2005 3:39 pm

WELL! Sorry I took so long in my response, I didn't know this thread existed, but I've been heartily enjoying the new stylus I just bought. And I always commemorate the occasion with a nice new stack of UNOPENED VINYL--I keep around a nice big pile of new LP's to admire just how flawlessly & quietly the ADC QLM-series needle can track (that is, once you've finally got it put in the right spot......myself & my fingers are getting way too old for this kind of delicate handiwork). Anyway, this is a stylus which die-hard analog nuts (chiefly, FANFARE's Neil G. Levenson) praised for its natural, musical quality.

And I'm a man of very little means: I've always been greatly satisfied by the reproduction of this stylus, which I'm piping in thru an upper-end Yamaha receiver & Koss Pro-4AA headphones.

Anyway, here's what I've heard, including much music I ordinarily wouldn't listen to:

SIR ADRIAN BOULT/LONDON PHIL.--"GOLDEN TREASURY OF CONCERT FAVORITES & MARCHES" (Columbia Special Products S2S-5262): Record-club-only issue from '68, one disc's got the ubiquitous march album by Boult, the other disc in the set has VERY apathetic run-throughs of old warhorses Boult probably wouldn't otherwise have touched--stuff like "Radetzky March," "Danse Macabre," "Poet & Peasant," even Gershwin's "Cuban Overture"!

MUSIC FROM MARLBORO (Columbia MS-6848)--an '83 pressing, at which time CBS cleaned up its act with its vinyl pressings; this disc's got a nice Mendelssohn Octet, played by the likes of Schneider, Laredo, Steinhardt, Dalley, Tree, Rhodes, Parnas & Soyer.

E. POWER BIGGS--ORGAN MUSIC OF EARLY AMERICA (Columbia MS-6161)--neat collection of offbeat, seldom-heard stuff.

ALFRED DELLER--COUPERIN'S LECONS DE TENEBRES (RCA Victrola VICS-1431)--I could tell this one was likely a '69 first-pressing, judging from how heavy it was. I don't particularly like countertenor stuff, but it was nice nonetheless.

LaSALLE QUARTET--ZEMLINSKY'S STRING QUARTET #2 (DGG 2530-982)--again, an era & culture in music I ordinarily wouldn't give two bits for. Great to have an import disc at hand, though, to celebrate the present occasion.

THE BEST OF THE CANADIAN BRASS (CBS IP-7965)--this is actually a record-club pressing, made AFTER Masterworks quit making LPs for the commercial market altogether. (They made a rather half-assed job of pressing this one, too.)

HERB ALPERT, THE TIJUANA BRASS & FRIENDS--"MUSIC BOX"--that promotional LP from what used to be called BankAmericard (presently Visa), it's still good to unwrap a piece of vintage late-60s vinyl, even from an indie label......and Herbie Alpert's A&M was indeed one of the last of the independents, before selling lock, stock, & barrel to one of the majors at the end of the 80s. This disc's also got cuts from the Baja Marimba Band, The Sandpipers, and Claudine Longet.

STEVE ALLEN--"A SEASON OF HOPE"--a broadcast-only LP I found for sale recently; it's a Christmas radio special from '88, from Christian organization SandCastles International.
Last edited by Wallingford on Tue Sep 26, 2006 9:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

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Post by Ralph » Fri May 06, 2005 6:39 pm

The Emerson Quartet and several string quartets (numbers 2, 3 and 7) to unwind from a very long day of liitgating before a tough panel.
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Post by Ralph » Sat May 07, 2005 8:57 am

At the moment I'm at Columbia while my son is in his course. With my Sharper Image Noise Cancellation headphones I'm enjoying Isaac Stern playing music composed by or frequently performed by the one and only Fritz Kreisler. After that a Marco Polo disc I just bought a half hour ago of orchestral works by Tansman-no idea what to expect.
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Post by Haydnseek » Sat May 07, 2005 2:32 pm

Stravinsky: Le Sacre du printemps - Colin Davis, Concertgebow Orchestra
Stravinsky: Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments - Theo Bruins, Edo de Waart, Netherlands Wind Ensemble
Stravinsky: Ebony Concerto - George Pieterson, Edo de Waart, Netherlands Wind Ensemble
Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique - Colin Davis, Concertgebow Orchestra
Franck and Bizet Symphonies - Semyon Bychkov, Orchestra de Paris
Rossini: Il Barbiere di Siviglia - Will Humburg conducting
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Post by Thomas J » Sat May 07, 2005 2:37 pm

Dvorak - Symphonies 7 & 8, London S.O./ Kertesz

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat May 07, 2005 3:03 pm

Haydnseek wrote:Stravinsky: Le Sacre du printemps - Colin Davis, Concertgebow Orchestra
Stravinsky: Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments - Theo Bruins, Edo de Waart, Netherlands Wind Ensemble
Stravinsky: Ebony Concerto - George Pieterson, Edo de Waart, Netherlands Wind Ensemble
Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique - Colin Davis, Concertgebow Orchestra
Franck and Bizet Symphonies - Semyon Bychkov, Orchestra de Paris
Rossini: Il Barbiere di Siviglia - Will Humburg conducting
My! All at once????? :shock:
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Post by Haydnseek » Sat May 07, 2005 3:26 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
Haydnseek wrote:Stravinsky: Le Sacre du printemps - Colin Davis, Concertgebow Orchestra
Stravinsky: Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments - Theo Bruins, Edo de Waart, Netherlands Wind Ensemble
Stravinsky: Ebony Concerto - George Pieterson, Edo de Waart, Netherlands Wind Ensemble
Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique - Colin Davis, Concertgebow Orchestra
Franck and Bizet Symphonies - Semyon Bychkov, Orchestra de Paris
Rossini: Il Barbiere di Siviglia - Will Humburg conducting
My! All at once????? :shock:
Over two days actually. I put on the opera while I assembled furniture - it masked the cursing.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

mich

Post by mich » Sat May 07, 2005 8:50 pm

For the last two weeks and at least another week my music is tinny and thin (small tranny being used) My Plinius Class A Amp started to rattle so off to the FIXERS. So I'm not listening to very much at the moment, decided to get my Flute out and give it go, better than nothing I thought
suddenly had the House to myself :cry: :cry:

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Post by Dana » Sat May 07, 2005 9:35 pm

Haydnseek wrote:Stravinsky: Le Sacre du printemps - Colin Davis, Concertgebow Orchestra
Do you have Bernstein's LSO rec on Sony Masterworks? Incredible!

Beethoven Romances with Oistrakh on DG Originals. These works are paired with Brahms, Tchaikovsky, and Bach violin concertos on two discs. Listened to the Tchaik & Brahms already, the Brahms is far superior to his EMI rec, the first movement is so rivetingly fiery 8)
Be away for a while - computer problems, then camp, then college - Expect me back when the bell tolls one!!!

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Post by Ralph » Sat May 07, 2005 10:01 pm

The predicted rain never came and the sun actually came out. Before the Philharmonic concert I sat in Central Park and listened to Shostakovich's string quartets 9, 10 and 11 as performed by the Manhattan String Quartet on Es.say.

I also listened to symphonies 3 and 7 by Sibelius and conducted by Sir Colin Davis on BMG.
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Post by Ralph » Sat May 07, 2005 10:11 pm

Last CD for the night: Mahler's First with Bernstein and the NYP.
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Post by Ralph » Sun May 08, 2005 5:26 am

First hearing in the dawn's early light, a new NAXOS release in their British Piano Concerto series. Peter Donohoe is the pianist and conductor leading the Northern Sinfonia in four concertos.

Alex Rowley's Concerto in D major for Piano, Strings and Percussion, Op. 49 is tonal and free-flowing, a nice, sprigthly piece. Christian Darnton's Concertino in C major for Piano and String Orchestra is a neoclassical, energetic, fast-paced piece. Howard Ferguson's Concerto for Piano and String Orchestra, Op. 12 is lyrical and complex with interweaving themes. Lastly, is Roberto Gerhard's 1961 Concerto for Piano and Strings with is just a mite too serial for me but the blending of atonality with motifs from Spanish folk songs is interesting.

All these composers were new to me so for $7.99 I got a good introduction to some attractive composers.

NAXOS 8.557290.
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Post by GK » Sun May 08, 2005 8:15 am

Mahler Sym.#10--Wigglesworth, BBC Orch of Wales. The work after the 1st movement is actually by Mahler expert Deryck Cooke from sketches by Mahler. Not the best of Mahler, nevertheless a hint of Mahler.

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Post by Sisyphus » Sun May 08, 2005 12:30 pm

I am listening to Bernstein's Mass. Kent Nagano is conducting the Deutsches Symphonie-Orcheter Berlin with Jerry Hadley as the Celebrant. I haven't decided if I like it or not.
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Post by Ralph » Sun May 08, 2005 6:24 pm

Lots of listening today on the street and in the Park (Central, of course). Angela Hewitt's superb two-disc recording of Chopin's Nocturnes (HYPERION), Andras Schiff and Miklos Perenyi's two-disc performance of LvB's Complete Music for Piano and Violincello (ECM-highly recommended) and the new DG release of pianist Helene Grimaud's Chopin and Rachmaninov's piano sonatas and Berceuse and Barcarolle (both Chopin).
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Post by Thomas J » Sun May 08, 2005 6:36 pm

Robert Schumann - Piano Concerto, Emil Gilels, Karl Bohm, LSO
Recorded Live August 10. 1975

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Post by Ralph » Sun May 08, 2005 8:00 pm

Just enjoyed a "new" composer - Bernard Stevens (1916-1983) on MARCO POLO. The disc, with pianist Martin Roscoe and Adrian Leaper conducting the National S.O. of Ireland, features his Dance Suite, Piano Concerto and Variations, an 18 minute work for orchestra.

Tonal, accessible and very enjoyable, Stevens drew from all genres of English music. A nice (only $5.99) discovery.

MARCO POLO 8.223480.
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Post by Dana » Tue May 10, 2005 6:18 am

The organ symphonies of Alexandre Guillmante. Unusual listening for me which I received from a friend at GMG. It's strange, I can hear the romantic influences of Brahms and Tchaikovsky, but these symphonies are so obviously not from either of these composers because they lack the idiomatic Russian or Austrian flair. It's French.
Be away for a while - computer problems, then camp, then college - Expect me back when the bell tolls one!!!

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