Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Discuss whatever you want here ... movies, books, recipes, politics, beer, wine, TV ... everything except classical music.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
Ricordanza
Posts: 2222
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 4:58 am
Location: Southern New Jersey, USA

Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Ricordanza » Sat Jan 15, 2022 4:41 pm

This is good news. While it would be great if the voting rights legislation which passed the House were enacted into law, that's not going to happen. The filibuster remains in place. But now it appears that key Senators from both parties are looking at legislation which will help ensure a fair and accurate counting of votes in 2024, as explained in this New York Times article. That's a start.
Democrats Face a Dilemma on Voting: Compromise or Keep Pressing?
With their broad voting rights push nearing a dead end, Democrats must soon decide whether to embrace a far narrower bipartisan effort to protect vote counting and administration.
By Jonathan Weisman
Jan. 14, 2022
WASHINGTON — With their drive to secure far-reaching voting rights legislation nearing a dead end, Senate Democrats face a decision they had hoped to avoid: Should they embrace a much narrower, bipartisan effort to safeguard the vote-counting process, or continue what increasingly looks like a doomed push to protect access to the ballot box?

A growing group of Senate Republicans and centrist Democrats is working on legislation to overhaul the Electoral Count Act, the 19th-century law that former President Donald J. Trump sought to exploit to overturn the 2020 presidential election. That effort is expanding to include other measures aimed at preventing interference in election administration, such as barring the removal of nonpartisan election officials without cause and creating federal penalties for the harassment or intimidation of election officials.

Democratic leaders say they regard the effort as a trap — or at least a diversion from the central issue of voter suppression that their legislation aims to address. They argue that the narrower measures are woefully inadequate given that Republicans have enacted a wave of voting restrictions in states around the country that are geared toward disenfranchising Democratic voters, particularly people of color.

Still, even if there is no consensus to be found on a bill addressing how votes are cast, proponents say there is a growing sentiment in favor of ensuring that those that are cast are fairly counted.

“There is a lot of interest, a lot of interest,” said Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, who is leading one effort with Senators Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona and Joe Manchin III of West Virginia, both centrist Democrats, and Senators Mitt Romney of Utah, Thom Tillis of North Carolina, Roger Wicker of Mississippi and Joni Ernst of Iowa, all Republicans.

Senators Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, and Joe Manchin III, Democrat of West Virginia, are part of a group working on a narrower bill to ensure votes are fairly counted.

Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Democrat of New Hampshire, also listened in on a call on the matter this month but remains noncommittal.

“I’m not saying this is going to be easy,” Ms. Collins added, “but I’m optimistic.”

A separate group — including two Democratic senators, Richard J. Durbin of Illinois and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Senator Angus King, a left-of-center independent from Maine — is looking at changing how Congress formalizes the election results to head off another attempt like the one Mr. Trump made to have allies on Capitol Hill try to toss out state electoral votes.

But most Democrats are reluctant even to discuss the matter until after the far more comprehensive voting rights bill they call the Freedom to Vote Act is put to rest next week, a near certainty after Ms. Sinema and Mr. Manchin said this week that they would not vote to change Senate rules on the filibuster to enable their party to push it through unilaterally.

“There are two issues going on right now in the country. One is voter suppression — these subtle laws that make it harder for people to vote,” Mr. King said. “The other piece is voting administration, where you get into substituting partisan people for nonpartisan administrators, purging voter election boards, allowing election boards to eliminate polling places and also the whole mechanics of counting.”

He added, “There’s a reasonable opportunity here for a bipartisan bill, but my concern is that it will be viewed as a substitute for the Freedom to Vote Act, and that’s just not the case.”

Members of both parties are concerned about the counting and certification of ballots after they have been cast. President Biden was emphatic on the point when he emerged Thursday from a fruitless lunch with Senate Democrats, pleading with them to change the filibuster rules around voting.

“The state legislative bodies continue to change the law not as to who can vote, but who gets to count the vote, count the vote, count the vote,” he said, his voice rising in anger. “It’s about election subversion.”

And some academic experts say protecting election administration and vote counting, at this moment, is actually more critical than battling restrictions on early and absentee voting and ballot drop boxes.

“I’ve been saying this for the last year: The No. 1 priority should be ensuring we have a fair vote count,” said Richard L. Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Irvine, who has drafted his own prescriptions for safeguarding elections after Election Day. “We are in a new level of crisis. I never expected in the contemporary United States that we would have to have legislation around a fair vote count, but we have to have it now.”

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, has opened the door a crack to changing the Electoral Count Act, which Mr. Trump and his legal advisers speciously claimed gave the vice president the power to unilaterally reject the electors from states deemed contested.

“It obviously has some flaws. And I think it should be discussed,” Mr. McConnell told reporters on Tuesday. “That is a totally separate issue from what they’re peddling on the Democratic side.”


Democrats are leery. They fear Republicans want to reassure Mr. Manchin and Ms. Sinema that if, as promised, they reject their party’s efforts to do away with the filibuster to pass voting rights legislation, they will have the bipartisan alternative they crave.

Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the majority leader, has said not only would that alternative be wholly insufficient, but it also would probably not materialize.

In 2019, as Democrats were pushing for gun safety legislation after a pair of mass shootings, Republican leaders who opposed the bill raised the prospect of narrower legislation to help law enforcement take guns from those who pose an imminent danger. Once the Democratic bills failed, the more modest one did, too.

Why are voting rights an issue now? In 2020, as a result of the pandemic, millions embraced voting early in person or by mail, especially among Democrats. Spurred on by Donald Trump’s false claims about mail ballots in hopes of overturning the election, the G.O.P. has pursued a host of new voting restrictions.

What are Republicans trying to do? Broadly, the party is taking a two-pronged approach: imposing additional restrictions on voting (especially mail voting) and giving G.O.P.-controlled state legislatures greater control over the mechanics of casting and counting ballots.

Why are these legislative efforts important? The Republican push to tighten voting rules has fueled doubts about the integrity of the democratic process in the U.S. Many of the restrictions are likely to affect voters of color disproportionately.

How are Democrats pushing back? In Congress, Democrats have focused their efforts on two sweeping bills that protect access to voting and clarify how to count electoral votes, but Republicans in the 50-50 Senate have blocked both. President Biden endorsed changing the Senate’s filibuster rules to pass the legislation.

Which states have changed their voting laws? Nineteen states passed 34 laws restricting voting in 2021. Some of the most significant legislation was enacted in battleground states like Texas, Georgia and Florida. Republican lawmakers are planning a new wave of election laws in 2022.

Will these new laws swing elections? Maybe. Maybe not. Some laws will make voting more difficult for certain groups, cause confusion or create longer wait times at polling places. But the new restrictions could backfire on Republicans, especially in rural areas that once preferred to vote by mail.

“Is it something that we might consider? Yes,” Mr. Schumer said of vote counting legislation, “but not as a substitute for these vital, vital provisions which will keep the right to vote and prevent voter suppression.”

The lawmakers who are eyeing an overhaul of the Electoral Count Act say they want to address what happened last year, when allies of Mr. Trump challenged the election results during a Jan. 6 joint session of Congress, and the president was pressuring Vice President Mike Pence, who presided over the session, to reject the disputed electors.

One proposed change would make clear that the vice president has only a ceremonial and administrative role in the counting of electoral votes. Another would make it far more difficult to raise objections under the law, which currently allows a single senator and House member to mount a challenge to a state’s electoral votes. In the bill drafted by Mr. King, Mr. Durbin and Ms. Klobuchar, electors could be challenged only if a third of each chamber objected.

In the House, four members of the committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack — Representative Liz Cheney, Republican of Wyoming, and Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Adam B. Schiff of California and Jamie Raskin of Maryland, all Democrats — are also working on a rewrite of the Electoral Count Act. They have also discussed whether to expand their bill to include measures blocking anti-democratic election practices at the state level, such as allowing partisan legislators to select presidential electors instead of the voters.

Ms. Collins’s group has discussed several measures, such as expanding the allowable uses of federal election grants, now mainly for buying voting machines not connected to the internet, to include recruiting and training election workers, purchasing voting machines that create paper ballots and expanding cybersecurity efforts. She said the group also agreed that stiff new penalties should be created to thwart the kind of harassment and intimidation of election officials that supporters of Mr. Trump had meted out, a provision taken from the Freedom to Vote Act.

They are still debating how far to go in blocking the removal of nonpartisan election officials without cause by partisan state officials or legislators. The Democrats’ voting rights bill makes such actions a federal crime unless malfeasance by the election official can be proved.

For Democrats, that provision is a necessity. And they say for Ms. Collins’s measure to gain any traction, Republicans would have to accept some provisions from the voting rights bill to combat voter suppression, such as a minimal number of early voting days or a compromise provision drafted by Mr. Manchin that accepts voter identification laws but ensures that an array of identifications would be acceptable.

“It’s very important to ensure that the votes are counted both with provisions in the Freedom to Vote Act and the Electoral Count Act, but that’s still no substitute for protecting people’s right to vote from the beginning,” said Ms. Klobuchar, who is chairwoman of the Rules Committee, which would consider such legislation.

Ms. Collins said her group — which includes two additional Republicans and two additional Democrats who have not publicly divulged their involvement — will meet again the week after the voting rights bill is blocked.

“It’s evident we have to get through this stage,” she said.

But, she added, she is not seeking Mr. McConnell’s blessing. Earlier this month, she said she spoke at a closed-door luncheon of Republican senators to walk her colleagues through the effort. Mr. Romney stood to back her up.

“We don’t feel like we have to ask for permission,” she said.

Rach3
Posts: 5620
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Rach3 » Sat Jan 15, 2022 6:25 pm

Democrats never learn.They STILL think there are " good " Republicans. Collins ?! Tillis ?! Ernst?! Wicker ?! Romney who went hat in hand begging Trump to appoint him Sec. of State ?! Please !!

CNN today:


https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/14/politics ... index.html

"Hundreds of mail-in ballot applications are being rejected in some of Texas's largest counties because of the new voting law passed by the Republican-led state legislature last year, according to multiple election officials.

Election officials in Harris County, Travis County and Bexar County say they are rejecting a high volume of mail-in ballot applications for the March 1 primary. The counties include Houston, Austin and San Antonio, respectively.

Under the new voting law, voters must include either their driver's license number or the last four digits of their Social Security number on their applications. Those numbers are then matched against voters' records. For a voter to be approved for a mail-in ballot, the numbers have to be the same.

However, not every voter remembers which number they gave when they initially registered to vote, leading to the application rejections."

Ricordanza
Posts: 2222
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 4:58 am
Location: Southern New Jersey, USA

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Ricordanza » Sun Jan 16, 2022 7:58 am

Rach3 wrote:
Sat Jan 15, 2022 6:25 pm
Democrats never learn.They STILL think there are " good " Republicans. Collins ?! Tillis ?! Ernst?! Wicker ?! Romney who went hat in hand begging Trump to appoint him Sec. of State ?! Please !!
None of those named would get my vote if I lived in their states, but they are currently in the Senate and basic arithmetic says that some of them have to get on board to pass any kind of electoral reform. What's the alternative? Wait until 2023? The Democrats will probably lose seats in both houses of Congress.

maestrob
Posts: 14840
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by maestrob » Sun Jan 16, 2022 10:05 am

Democrats never learn.They STILL think there are " good " Republicans. Collins ?! Tillis ?! Ernst?! Wicker ?! Romney who went hat in hand begging Trump to appoint him Sec. of State ?! Please !!
Agree. This sounds too much like Lucy & the football. I am decidedly NOT optimistic, especially since Moscow Mitch is involved.

I've had my hopes dashed too many times by this crowd. Democrats are just too credulous. Still. As George Tenet said of W. Bush, R. Cheney & Rumsfeld, "These are not men of good faith."

Never forget. :twisted:

Rach3
Posts: 5620
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Rach3 » Sun Jan 16, 2022 11:08 am

Ricordanza wrote:
Sun Jan 16, 2022 7:58 am
What's the alternative? Wait until 2023? The Democrats will probably lose seats in both houses of Congress.
Your points are well - made , but my conclusion is the battle was already lost when Biden initially was at best luke-warm about reforming the filibuster, and the Dems since have not been aggressive with Manchin and Sinema on filibuster or Biden's agenda. The best hope may be getting a big voter turnout in 2022, with millions of people , both GOP and Dem voters, getting really mad in November when they discover how their State GOP has made it so difficult for them to vote, which difficulties the Dems can point out during the 2022 campaigns. I have no faith in Congressional GOP.

Of course , voting restrictions are a separate issue from gerrymandering, which may have already sealed the deal for the GOP even if Dems' voting reforms were enacted.SCOTUS indicates it's not inclined to interfere with partisan gerrymanders and suggested Federal Courts should not either.

From NYT today:

"G.O.P.’s Heavy Edge: Republicans are poised to capture enough seats to take the House in 2022, thanks to gerrymandering alone.

A U.S. Supreme Court decision in 2019 that partisan mapmaking could not be challenged in federal courts means that state courts are now the remaining judicial avenue to contest partisan gerrymandering — at least in states like Ohio where the Constitution bans it.

A case headed to North Carolina’s Supreme Court also seeks to overturn a G.O.P. gerrymander. Republicans there would control as many as 11 of the state’s 14 House seats with the new maps, compared to the party’s current advantage of eight seats to five. A lower court on Tuesday upheld the maps." ( Rach3: Tillis' North Carolina GOP in action.)

Rach3
Posts: 5620
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Rach3 » Sun Jan 16, 2022 8:26 pm

From WAPO tonight:

Opinion: If Democrats want to win, they must change the venue

By Jennifer Rubin
Columnist


" Our democracy is already badly injured. One political party flirts with violence and seeks to undermine the sanctity of elections. And many voters seem indifferent to the fate of democracy going into this year’s midterm elections.


When Kevin McCarthy (Calif.), the man most likely to be House speaker should Republicans retake the chamber, snubs a committee investigating the former president’s involvement in an insurrection, we know the rule of law is crumbling. And when Republican “leaders” cannot curb a batch of conspiracy-theory spouting, violence-infatuated crackpots — e.g., Republican Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene (Ga.), Lauren Boebert (Colo.), Madison Cawthorn (N.C.), Mo Brooks (Ala.), Matt Gaetz (Fla.), Paul A. Gosar (Ariz.) — we know we are staring at an era of chaos.

Democracy took more hits last week. Senate Democrats, thanks to Sens. Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.) and Joe Manchin III (W.Va.), will not be able to protect democracy without asking permission from their Republican colleagues, who are rooting for fewer voters and partisan election administration. It would be funny if it were not so morally vacuous.

The Supreme Court, meanwhile, has lost credibility as a guardian of democracy and constitutional government. Its right-wing justices seem untethered to the Constitution or statutory text. On Thursday, they made up a new requirement that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration cannot regulate workplace hazards (i.e., covid-19) unless they appear only in the workplace. This is not textualism; it is partisan hackery. Such a distinction appears nowhere in federal law.

This follows the Supreme Court’s handiwork in neutering democracy by undercutting enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, making mincemeat of the “effects” provision in Section 2 of the law and eliminating Section 5′s preclearance provisions. The court also seems ready to throw out decades of precedent protecting the right to an abortion. This is not how our democracy is supposed to function.

President Biden, having reached these dead ends in the Senate and in the courts, must fight on different terrain. This is different from dumping what his critics complain is an excessively “progressive” agenda. (If voting rights is now only a progressive issue, we are in deep trouble.) He and his Democratic allies need to seek different venues to bolster democracy, not surrender to authoritarians.

When it comes to voting rights and, frankly, all constitutional rights, Biden must take his case outside the Beltway. The theme is simple: Do not let politicians control voters. Preserve Americans’ control over their government and their own lives.

That means Democrats need to double down in support of state-level, pro-democracy referendums akin to anti-gerrymandering initiatives that have succeeded in curbing partisan redistricting. Voters can insist on nonpartisan redistricting and shield election workers from removal without cause. They can also block abortion “bounties” and other schemes that impair women’s physical autonomy.

Democrats also need to win elections for state judges to ensure that those interpreting state laws and constitutions value democracy and privacy rights. Democrats should likewise heavily invest in state legislative and executive races (i.e., governor, secretary of state, state attorney general). If they win more of these contests, they can hamper Republicans’ agenda. Quite simply, this is a battle to prevent authoritarians from thwarting the will of the people and the rights of individuals.
Yes, Democrats will have to overcome voter suppression and gerrymandering. But that does not mean they are incapable of winning more statewide races, firing up and expanding their base, making headway in state courts and enlisting popular support for voters to maintain control over politicians (not the reverse).


Broadly speaking, this is putting democracy on the ballot. In concrete terms, it means stopping Republicans from disempowering voters. Arrogant incumbents who figure out ways to avoid getting voted out of office can pursue wildly unpopular policies — from dismantling gun safety measures to allowing the government to decide when a women will bear children.

Impairing democracy is central to Republicans ability to retain and expand power. Only their status as a minority party has prevented their radical agenda from becoming reality. They have already signaled that once in power, they are not going to focus on covid, inflation or the climate, but on demonizing immigrants, impeaching the president and sowing chaos (e.g., shutting down the government, threatening to default on the debt).

If Democrats cannot convince voters that Republicans up and down the ballot want to minimize voters’ power and instead pursue their own unpopular, extremist agenda, we will surely find ourselves ruled by anti-democratic, radical MAGA soldiers answerable only to their cult leader. Put differently, if Democrats cannot persuade voters that Republicans are the party that covers up a violent insurrection; roots for book burning and removing the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. from school curriculums; plots to overturn elections; and wants to force women to give birth, we are headed for an era of radical GOP rule.

Biden cannot remake the Supreme Court. He cannot change Republicans, nor can he reason with Manchin and Sinema. What he can do is get more Democrats elected. The way to do that is pointing to Democrats successes (addressing covid, increasing jobs, investing in infrastructure) and making sure voters understand how Republicans plan to impose their extremist vision on Americans. "

(Rach3: So far, Biden and the Dems have failed to grasp this truth.It is probably too late.)

Ricordanza
Posts: 2222
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 4:58 am
Location: Southern New Jersey, USA

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Ricordanza » Mon Jan 17, 2022 7:02 am

Jennifer Rubin, as usual, has some sound advice.

By the way, she began her tenure as a Washington Post columnist as a conservative (I believe her column was entitled "Right Turn"). She then became a prominent "Never Trumper" and left the Republican Party. Has she now transformed into a supporter of the (Capital D) Democratic cause? I don't recall any recent columns by her pushing any conservative issue.

Rach3
Posts: 5620
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Rach3 » Mon Jan 17, 2022 9:56 am

Ricordanza wrote:
Mon Jan 17, 2022 7:02 am
Jennifer Rubin, as usual, has some sound advice.

By the way, she began her tenure as a Washington Post columnist as a conservative (I believe her column was entitled "Right Turn"). She then became a prominent "Never Trumper" and left the Republican Party. Has she now transformed into a supporter of the (Capital D) Democratic cause? I don't recall any recent columns by her pushing any conservative issue.
Interesting,thanks, was not aware of her history.

NYT today:

By Reginald T. Jackson
Bishop Jackson is the presiding prelate of the 6th Episcopal District of the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church, which comprises 534 Georgia churches, totaling more than 90,000 parishioners.

It has been less than a week since President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris came to Atlanta and gave speeches supporting federal legislation to protect and ensure voting rights. Now the legislation is as good as dead. It happened that quickly, but many of us in Georgia saw it coming a long way off.

African Americans, and most specifically faith leaders, have cried out during the last year, challenging various racist anti-voting bills — and we have heard virtually nothing from the White House or the Democratic Party.

This lack of response, especially at the local level, has created concern within the Black community, as well as political apathy: In November’s governor’s race in Virginia, for instance, Black voters made up 16 percent of the electorate, compared with 20 percent four years earlier. In recent months, Georgia’s A.M.E. churches and other denominations have held virtual town halls of thousands of local faith leaders to discuss what is happening in Georgia. What we hear from our communities is clear: The late-to-the-game D.C.-focused strategy allowed extremists to march state to state and change our local election laws. It has been far too passive and does not represent the “good trouble” John Lewis preached.

After all, it has been 10 long months since Georgia Republicans — following the historic victories of Joe Biden and Senate Democrats in the state — passed the “Election Integrity Act,” which will make it harder for many African Americans and people of color to vote. Among other things, it limits the ability to request absentee ballots and minimizes other voting opportunities. Last week, in their speeches, Mr. Biden and Ms. Harris strongly and passionately denounced the law. But as they spoke, I kept asking myself where had that strength and passion been during the past 10 months? We saw the administration’s strong commitment on behalf of the infrastructure bill and the Build Back Better Act, but not on voting rights. The White House slept on voting rights — and now our very democracy is at risk.

Being a native Delawarean, I know Mr. Biden and worked on several of his campaigns for the U.S. Senate. No one should ever question his commitment to civil rights or the African American community. He is a genuine and great public servant.

However, Mr. Biden, having been a member of the Senate for 36 years, wrongly thought the solution to ensuring voting rights lay in Washington, D.C. He expected elected officials would work across the aisle to pass meaningful legislation, as they often did when he was a senator. But, as so many of us have witnessed in recent years, Joe Biden’s Senate simply does not exist anymore. Instead, extremist Trump loyalists, desperate to keep their power, began an efficient and well-funded campaign to minimize Black and brown voters, first in Georgia, and then, in a domino effect, in state legislatures across the country.

So what do we do now?

First, President Biden must show his strength as a leader. The American people have little respect or patience for a weak leader, but they will support and stand with a strong one. Extreme Trump loyalists have been gutting voting rights with an ax, while Democrats have tried to defend them with a butter knife.

It’s time for Mr. Biden to show the 50 senators who reliably back the Democratic agenda that the nation did not elect 51 presidents. He needs to use his powers as president to show that opposing him comes with consequences, not unlike how President Johnson played hardball during negotiations on the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Neither friendships nor history with the Senate has worked, and inaction is unacceptable, so Mr. Biden must now draw a line in the sand. Our elected officials in Washington need the president to sign their bills, approve funding for their local projects, and secure their nominations for appointments. If senators are not going to support this top priority of the Biden administration, then the president needs to make clear that democracy will come first, before their own special projects, interests and priorities.

Second, the White House and the Democratic Party need to create a massive education campaign on the changes that have been made to our local voting rights laws. The reality is that most people still do not know what’s happening. Building this narrative cannot be done with one trip to Georgia or with one speech, nor will it be done with overzealous rhetoric. This fight must be about educating and informing people, not politics as usual. Mr. Biden and his administration need to consistently share with the American people what these new pieces of anti-voting legislation across the country are doing to our democracy and to our people. He must share the stories of those who will now struggle to exercise their democratic right. The facts must be showcased until every American understands what has occurred over the past year.

Third, the president needs to move the conversation on voting rights away from the failed Senate Democratic caucus and toward an energized voter registration effort that builds on what was achieved in Georgia, Arizona and other states in 2020. While there never is going to be a quick fix for what extremists have done to our democracy over the last year, we have to organize to counter the new roadblocks. Mr. Biden’s legislative efforts must transition to a nationwide campaign to register voters and help people make plans to vote. Unlike what happened during the last year, there needs to be much more consistent communication, coordination, engagement and support between the White House and those promoting and defending our democracy at the local level.

Our collective history prepares Black and brown voters for potential voting battles on Election Day, and it’s imperative that our communities take on even greater responsibility in 2022. It is incumbent that African Americans not allow the events of the last year to create apathy in 2022. But the historic challenge we now face must also be extended to President Biden.

As we observe the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday on Monday, let us remember his words, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” Mr. President, at this historic moment, I have great confidence that you are strong enough, passionate enough and love this country enough to lead this army. But we need you to lead this fight as our president, not as a senator. This must not be the end of our fight; it needs to be our beginning. And to paraphrase King once again, please, listen to your conscience, and do what you know to be right. Lead us in the fight to save our great democracy — and we will follow.

maestrob
Posts: 14840
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by maestrob » Mon Jan 17, 2022 10:04 am

Lead us in the fight to save our great democracy — and we will follow.
Amen.

Not holding my breath...

Rach3
Posts: 5620
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Rach3 » Mon Jan 17, 2022 12:21 pm

maestrob wrote:
Mon Jan 17, 2022 10:04 am
Lead us in the fight to save our great democracy — and we will follow.
Amen.

Not holding my breath...
GOP "moderate" Romney yesterday:

"Sen. Mitt Romney on Sunday dinged President Joe Biden's governing approach, arguing that the longtime Democratic lawmaker was elected to restore a sense of normality to government and was not put into office to "transform" the country.

During an interview on NBC's "Meet the Press," the Utah Republican — who was also the party's presidential nominee in 2012 — told the host Chuck Todd that Biden needed to adhere to his commitment to bridge partisan divisions in the country in the wake of the president's fiery voting-rights speech in Atlanta last week.

"President Biden said he was going to try to unite the country," the senator said. "His comments in Georgia did not suggest he's trying to pull us back together again."

He continued: "He's got to recognize that when he was elected, people were not looking for him to transform America. They were looking to get back to normal. To stop the crazy. And it seems like we're continuing to see the kinds of policy and promotions that are not accepted by the American people."

https://news.yahoo.com/sen-mitt-romney- ... p_catchall

Rach3
Posts: 5620
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Rach3 » Wed Jan 19, 2022 10:16 am

Kansas City Star today:


"Kansas Republican redistricting plan splits Kansas City metro, dilutes Democratic vote.
One proposed map would split Wyandotte County in half and combine Johnson County with more rural areas to the South."

Manchin,Sinema care less.

Ricordanza
Posts: 2222
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 4:58 am
Location: Southern New Jersey, USA

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Ricordanza » Thu Jan 20, 2022 7:13 am

Federal voting rights legislation has had a weak pulse for the past several weeks, and finally coded last night in the Senate. I mourn its passing, but this is all the more reason to pursue what is possible in the area of electoral reform. Granted, it's not a full response to Republican efforts to suppress the vote, but there are still other efforts that can proceed at the state level, in the courts, etc.

Rach3
Posts: 5620
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by Rach3 » Fri Jan 21, 2022 11:38 am

Dont need reform thinks Mitch ? Freudian slip ?

" The minority leader made the remark at a news conference in Washington on Wednesday, when he was asked about concerns that people of color have about voting rights.

“The concern is misplaced because if you look at the statistics, African American voters are voting in just as high a percentage as Americans,” McConnell said.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/mcconnell-bl ... 52410.html

maestrob
Posts: 14840
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: Bipartisan electoral reform is on the table

Post by maestrob » Sun Jan 23, 2022 8:46 am

Rach3 wrote:
Fri Jan 21, 2022 11:38 am
Dont need reform thinks Mitch ? Freudian slip ?

" The minority leader made the remark at a news conference in Washington on Wednesday, when he was asked about concerns that people of color have about voting rights.

“The concern is misplaced because if you look at the statistics, African American voters are voting in just as high a percentage as Americans,” McConnell said.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/mcconnell-bl ... 52410.html
And I thought that Joe Biden was the one famous for gaffes... :roll:

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: barney and 27 guests