Single Malt scotch

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Stonebraker
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Single Malt scotch

Post by Stonebraker » Mon Oct 15, 2007 3:38 pm

I've always been a bourbon guy (well, not in high school, I was more of a 40 oz. guy, then started drinking Yeungling, then progressed to the Bourbon), and I find most Barrel Proof bourbons to be quite tasty. However I've recently developed quite the affinity for Single-Malt scotch. Just wanted to see if theres any other scotch drinkers out there, who in all likelyhook know much more about scotch than I. Hopefully I wont have to go out and spend $60 on a Cask Strength Macallan bottle if anyone can recommend anything good. Thus far, I've only really tried Glenfiddich, Glenlivet, Macallan, Glenfarclas.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Paul Stonebraker - Promoting orchestral music since '06

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Post by BWV 1080 » Mon Oct 15, 2007 3:43 pm

I am more partial to Bourbon myself (Booker's, Basil Hayden, Old Weller, Makers Mark and Rebel Yell (great bargain btw). I have not drunk alot of single malt - I actually prefer blended Dewars to single malt Glenlivet

Stonebraker
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Post by Stonebraker » Mon Oct 15, 2007 3:53 pm

I'll have to check out the Rebel Yell. I've always been a huge Knob Creek fan, but as for the small batches, Bookers and Bakers are both some of my favorites; the price keeps me away. I usual go for whatever small batch bourbon is on sale. I've found that Wild Turkey has pretty good small batches, the Wild Breed and rare breed I think theyre called. The Rare breed, to me, is especially delicious. I'm not a huge woodford reserve fan, but i'll drink it.

As for the Dewars vs Glenlivet I'm not sure how to respond, but I'm very biased. I always hated scotch cuz I would steal my dads Dewars during high school. Once I started checking out the fine single malts I loved them. If you're willing to spend a lot of money, I highly recommend the Cask Strength Macallan, its 58.6% and as close to "bourbony" as you'll get with scotch. Just make sure you cut it.

Speaking of, how do you like your bourbon? Cut with water? Strait up? On the rocks? I prefer mine neat, which seems to be pretty odd in comparison to other bourbon drinkers I've met. I've found room temperature bourbon the easiest to get the taste of. You can really let it roll over your tongue, and linger in your mouth to get all the flavors.
Paul Stonebraker - Promoting orchestral music since '06

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Post by BWV 1080 » Mon Oct 15, 2007 5:03 pm

[quote="Stonebraker"]to "bourbony" as you'll get with scotch. Just make sure you cut it.

Speaking of, how do you like your bourbon? Cut with water? Strait up? On the rocks? quote]

usually with water

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Thu Oct 18, 2007 5:05 pm

Just picked up a bottle of Mortlach from a friend who was in Scotland recently. Can't be found for love nor money Down Under.

The finest I've ever had was the '48 Macallan, but at $350 a nip (hand on heart) I only had it once. The '63 Macallan was long described as the best, but the single malt boom since the eighties means a whole bunch more competition in the last couple of decades.

Glenmorangie now comes in a variety of ages and maturation. Glenfarclas, Aberlour and such are old favourites but I cannot keep up with all the new labels and varieties, so mostly opt for XO cognac and beyond these days.

ch1525
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Re: Single Malt scotch

Post by ch1525 » Sat Nov 13, 2010 11:48 pm

I'm drinking some Glenlivet right now. I'm just getting into enjoying scotch. I think I like this Glenlivet a bit more than the 12 Year Glenfiddich.

Any other scotch aficionados here?

HoustonDavid
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Re: Single Malt scotch

Post by HoustonDavid » Sun Nov 14, 2010 12:10 am

I raised a lovely glass of Glenlivet on the Marine Corps birthday, an annual tradition
remembering some very brave men who didn't make it to their last rollcall. HBO is
rerunning "The Pacific" as a reminder of the hell they suffered. One glass of precious
single malt hardly covers it.

I treat great whiskey like good cognac, and sip it neat, savoring the rich aroma and
anticipating the matching flavor that goes with it. Comparing the great single malts
to the lower priced blended whiskeys is like comparing silver to gold as far as I'm
concerned. It is expensive, but I don't imbibe it as my regular drink of choice.

Part of enjoying it is anticipating the next time. And one drink is plenty. As anyone
knows who enjoys good beverages, one drink is sufficient to dull ones taste buds to
the point of not truly appreciating the next one. It might as well be from the bottom
of the shelf instead of the top.
"May You be born in interesting (maybe confusing?) times" - Chinese Proverb (or Curse)

John F
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Re: Single Malt scotch

Post by John F » Sun Nov 14, 2010 4:47 am

My father was a Glenfiddich man, but I always thought Glenlivet was smoother and richer in taste. But I'm not really a Scotch man, bourbon on the rocks suits me better - and best of all is a dry martini on the rocks with Bombay Gin and one olive.
John Francis

HoustonDavid
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Re: Single Malt scotch

Post by HoustonDavid » Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:15 am

I have to be honest about my taste for Glenlivet - it's my favorite, but too expensive
for my regular once-a-week drink of an evening. Only for special occasions, like five
or six times a year.

My regular is like yours John, a martini. Even expensive Gin is much less expensive
than single malt scotch. I prefer a "dirty" martini stirred over ice, which is one with
a few drops of the liquor from the olive jar as well as the traditional dry vermouth.
And my Texas olives are queen sized and stuffed with jalapenos. I actually started
mixing them that way long before I realized they had a name in the Bartenders Guide.
Stumbled upon the mixings by experimentation, which is how most drinks are discovered,
I suspect.
"May You be born in interesting (maybe confusing?) times" - Chinese Proverb (or Curse)

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