The Florida Senate Race

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The Florida Senate Race

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:39 pm

What's in a Hug?

Upstart candidate Marco Rubio has cut in half Governor Charlie Crist's lead in the race to win the Republican nomination for a Florida U.S. Senate in 2010. Mr. Crist looked to be heading toward a 29-point blowout in next year's primary, but his lead has dwindled to 15 points in two months.

-> Image
Marco Rubio

Mr. Crist has been plagued by his support for the $787 billion federal stimulus package. Back in February, when President Obama had towering approval ratings, getting on the White House money-dispensing express seemed like a good political idea. Not so much now, especially with conservative Republican primary voters. Mr. Rubio has been scoring points by reminding voters of "the hug" -- the excessively warm greeting exchanged between Gov. Crist and Mr. Obama when the president brought his "stimulus tour" to the state earlier this year.

Mr. Rubio told the Associated Press last week: "I was horrified. . . . This was more than just a courtesy greeting. This was an embrace and a support of $800 billion of deficit spending."

Mr. Crist isn't apologizing: "I'm a civil guy. The president of the United States is the president of the United States. . . . I have that kind of respect in my soul."

Don't be surprised if "the hug" shows up in future Rubio TV spots. Several months ago, I ran into Dick Gephardt, the former Democratic House Majority Leader and 2004 presidential candidate. I asked him why he didn't win the Iowa caucuses where he was favored. He told me: "The Howard Dean campaign ran multiple TV ads with me hugging George W. Bush and I never recovered from that with liberal primary voters."

Stay tuned for a conservative rerun as President Obama's policies and popularity are put on trial in the GOP Florida senate primary.

-- Stephen Moore

Rubio at the Rubicon

Former Florida House Speaker Marco Rubio's strategy of attacking Gov. Charlie Crist's conservative credentials has been paying dividends. A Quinnipiac poll last week shows Mr. Rubio has cut the governor's lead in their GOP Senate nomination battle by half since mid-August. Mr. Rubio also has proved the overwhelming favorite in a dozen straw polls held by Republican county committees so far.

Mr. Crist clearly recognizes his vulnerability and has begun trying to woo back conservatives. In a recent conservative talk radio ad, he notes: "Here in Florida, I've slashed government by 10 percent. That's $7 billion. And we've passed the biggest tax cuts in Florida history. Last fall, the conservative Cato Institute graded all 50 governors with a fiscal report card. I'm proud to say that I was ranked number one in America. Less government. Less taxes. It's more than a slogan."

At 59%, Mr. Crist may have the lowest job approval of his governorship, but the figure is still impressive given Florida's 11.2% unemployment rate. His popularity, however, is buttressed by strong support from moderates and independents.

A big advantage for Mr. Rubio is that the Florida GOP primary is closed: Democrats and Independents can't vote in it. Thus Mr. Rubio's biggest obstacle now is his lack of name recognition -- a problem that his high-profile ideological fight with the popular governor seems to be helping. While 52% of Republican voters still say they haven't heard enough about Mr. Rubio, 44% now have a favorable opinion of him. By contrast, 60% say they have a favorable opinion of Mr. Crist.

Earlier this month, Karl Rove contributed $1000 to Mr. Rubio's campaign, and just last week, Mr. Rubio received the endorsement of Oklahoma Senator Jim Inhofe.

-- Allysia Finley
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:41 pm

Joe Raedle/Getty


Rubio Rising
The Florida GOP has a new star

JOHN J. MILLER

Florida governor Charlie Crist is running for the Senate, and he isn’t supposed to lose — let alone lose in the Republican primary. He enjoys a high approval rating, has a history of success among voters, and raises campaign cash with the intensity of a Category 5 hurricane. His main opponent in the GOP primary is Marco Rubio, a 38-year-old Miami native who quotes Snoop Dogg lyrics on his Twitter account. On paper, it looks like a mismatch between an unbeatable juggernaut and a doomed also-ran.

Yet Crist may be vulnerable: He warmly embraced President Obama’s stimulus spending and is one of the most liberal politicians in the Republican firmament. Rubio is among the brightest young stars on the right. Their contest could become the sleeper race of 2010.

That would spoil the well-laid plans of many in the GOP establishment. They want the Senate race in Florida to be over before it starts. In May, when Crist declared that he would forgo a second term as governor and aim for the seat of retiring senator Mel Martinez, the National Republican Senatorial Committee waited all of 14 minutes to endorse him. “I never thought I’d see the day when a conservative was the insurgent in a Republican primary,” says Rubio. Yet this is precisely what he has become: a heavy underdog who must learn to wage the political version of asymmetric warfare. A recent Mason–Dixon poll gave Crist a big lead over his rival, 51 percent to 23 percent.

The election remains a year away. For a primary, it’s late on the calendar: Aug. 24, 2010. That gives Rubio plenty of time to catch up. The details of the Mason–Dixon poll suggest that he’ll have a fighting chance. Among Republicans who are familiar with both candidates, Crist’s lead slips to statistical insignificance. It’s basically a dead heat. “I’m not a kamikaze,” says Rubio. “At this time next year, you’re going to be analyzing a very different race.” For that prediction to come true, conservatives in Florida and around the country will have to turn Rubio’s candidacy into a cause.

Marco Antonio Rubio was born in 1971, the son of Cuban exiles. His father worked late nights as a bartender. His mother was a hotel maid and a stock clerk at Kmart. They lived in Miami, moved to Las Vegas for a few years, and finally returned to Florida. “I gained an interest in politics and history from my uncle, who would read books and newspapers out loud to us,” says Rubio. As with many boys, sports were a priority. He played defensive back for his high-school football team. He says he has a recurring dream — a “nightmare,” he calls it — about a playoff game in 1987: “We should have won, but the referees called back a play, we missed a field goal, and our team lost.”

Rubio was talented enough to earn a scholarship to Tarkio College in Missouri. After a year, he left the gridiron and transferred to the University of Florida. Then came law school at the University of Miami. He remains an avid football fan and keeps fit playing in a competitive flag-football league. “Don’t disturb him during Miami Dolphins games,” warns a former colleague. “He doesn’t just watch them — he studies them.” Rubio’s devotion to the Dolphins is a family affair: His wife is a former team cheerleader. They have four children.

Early on, Rubio began to dabble in politics. He interned for Republican congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and later coordinated the Dole-Kemp campaign in Miami–Dade County. “That was a tough assignment, but Marco was passionate,” says Al Cardenas, a former chair of the Florida GOP. “He had good people skills and helped the volunteers keep their spirits up. That’s when I first thought he might be going places.”

In 1998, at the age of 26, Rubio stepped into public life: He won a race to serve on the West Miami city commission. The next year, a spot opened in the state legislature. Rubio declared his candidacy in the special election and finished second in the Republican primary. This led to a runoff, and a lot of hustling: He walked neighborhoods, knocked on doors, and raised enough money to broadcast a few radio ads. In the end, he pulled off a minor upset, winning by 64 votes. It was the last time he faced a difficult race. The district was safe for Republicans, and voters sent him back to Tallahassee four times. Last year, term limits prevented him from running again.

As a young legislator, Rubio caught the eye of his elders. “He’s got all the tools,” says Jeb Bush, the former governor. “He’s charismatic and has the right principles.” Rubio compiled a conservative voting record and started to climb the GOP’s leadership ladder, eventually becoming speaker of the House. The capitol’s veterans occasionally mistook him for an aide: Lt. Gov. Toni Jennings once marched into his office, handed him a stack of papers, and asked him to make copies. At the time, Rubio was majority leader. “I did make the copies,” he says. For the most part, however, his youth was an asset. “I watched him grow up in the House,” says Lindsay Harrington, a former speaker pro tem. “He has an amazing ability to deliver a message — when he gives a speech, you can hear a pin drop.”

That’s what observers say about Rubio, over and over again: He’s a first-rate communicator. “He has a gift,” says Larry Cretul, the current House speaker. “People love listening to him.” He certainly has a flair for one-liners. Cap-and-trade legislation, he says, “will do nothing but make America one of the cleanest Third World economies.” He urges the GOP to avoid ethnic pandering, and dismisses concerns that opposition to the Supreme Court nomination of Sonia Sotomayor would hurt Republicans among Hispanics: “We don’t need more mariachi bands at the rallies.”

Thanks to YouTube, Rubio’s farewell address last year probably has been seen by more viewers than any other speech in the history of the Florida statehouse. That may sound like faint praise, and Rubio’s clip doesn’t compete with web sensations such as Susan Boyle or Obama Girl. But he’s gone about as viral as any state legislator can hope to go without setting his pants on fire. More recently, he has taken advantage of Twitter. He comments on everything from the state of his campaign to how long it takes his wife to get ready for a night out.

Behind the rhetoric and panache, there’s substance. When Rubio became speaker, he unveiled a plan to develop “100 innovative ideas for Florida’s future.” He and other officials traveled the state, holding “idea-raisers” with voters. The stated goal was to find ways to improve life in Florida without unduly increasing the size of government. The result was a conservative legislative agenda, released on the web and as a short book. Judging from the recommendations Rubio adopted, it would seem that everybody in Florida was an intern at the Heritage Foundation. Fifty-seven of the proposals were passed, many of them small-bore. The most ambitious was No. 96, which called for capping or eliminating the state property tax and replacing it with a revenue-neutral sales-tax hike. “We couldn’t get Crist or the state senators to go along with it — they didn’t want to be bold,” says Rubio. “That was probably my biggest disappointment as speaker. Florida could be in a much stronger position today.” In his bid for the Senate, tax reform remains his No. 1 talking point.

Rubio’s efforts on the campaign trail are starting to pay off. This summer, he has won lopsided victories in straw polls conducted by GOP executive committees. In June, Pasco County Republicans favored Rubio by a vote of 73 to 9. In July, Rubio trounced Crist in Lee County (60 to 11) and Highland County (75 to 1). Technically, these tallies are meaningless. Yet they express a growing disillusionment with Crist at the party’s core. The governor’s global-warming alarmism has unsettled conservatives for a long time. Then there’s his appointment of a liberal to the state supreme court, his approval of a state budget that raises cigarette taxes, and his hug of Obama at a political event in support of the president’s spending plans. On August 12, Republicans in Palm Beach County held a vote to censure Crist. The measure failed, but only because the final vote was a tie. In this environment, Rubio begins to look like an attractive alternative.

The Republican case for Crist is simple and pragmatic: He’ll win the seat, hands down, at a time when the GOP can’t afford to take any chances. The number of Republicans in the U.S. Senate has dwindled to 40. Six incumbents have announced plans to retire, most of them in states where Democrats can be expected to compete. It’s possible that Republicans will make gains next year in congressional races and the states but actually lose ground in the Senate. The fear is that Rubio will become a slightly more successful version of Pat Toomey, the former Pennsylvania congressman who electrified conservatives and nearly stole the GOP nomination from then-Republican Arlen Specter in 2004. Many think that giving the party’s nod to Crist at least would remove a question mark from the political map. Rubio has a ready retort: “I can’t beat Kendrick Meek?” he asks, in reference to the left-wing congressman who is the likely Democratic nominee.

Rubio has heard suggestions, in public and private, that he should seek a different office. He might run for state attorney general, for instance. Or he could be tapped as a candidate for lieutenant governor. Another opportunity to run for the Senate will present itself in 2012, when the current term of Democratic senator Bill Nelson expires. But Rubio says he won’t budge: “I’m in this race to win. Many of the things that make America unique are threatened by politicians in Washington, D.C. We’re going to make irreversible decisions over the next four to six years. I want to be a part of correcting the course.”

Several factors may work to Rubio’s advantage. The primary is closed, which means that only registered Republicans can participate. Turnout probably will be low, which increases the importance of conservative activists. Rubio also has started to attract national attention. Sen. Jim DeMint of South Carolina and former presidential candidate Mike Huckabee have endorsed him. Interestingly, Jeb Bush has remained quiet, fueling speculation that he might back Rubio if the race is close next summer. His son, Jeb Bush Jr., is a confirmed Rubio supporter. That Rubio is of Cuban ancestry doesn’t hurt, either. “Finding Latino stars in the Republican party is a big deal,” says Mike Murphy, a GOP political consultant and Rubio donor. “I don’t want to pigeonhole him — I’d like him if he was Scandinavian — but it’s a plus.”

The biggest challenge for Rubio will be money. In the second quarter of this year, Crist amassed $4.3 million. Rubio managed about one-twelfth of that amount: $340,000. This low figure has caused some to question his discipline. A shake-up of his campaign staff this summer raised doubts, too. Rubio clearly enjoys the performance aspect of politics. To win, however, he’ll also need to devote hours and hours of each day to the drudgery of fundraising: making cold calls, asking strangers for money, and receiving far more rejections than checks. This is the only way he’ll gain the resources to put ads on television, which is the only way to compete in a large state with as many media markets as Florida.

The good news is that Rubio doesn’t have to match Crist dollar for dollar. But he does need to hit a certain mark — enough to lift his name into the consciousness of most Florida Republicans. It can probably be done for about $5 million, give or take. Primaries are famously fluid, with lots of last-minute deciders. Candidates such as Rubio can close hard and fast in the final two or three weeks, but only if they spend a long time preparing to make the most of their opportunity.

Rubio may want to think of his task as a football game: He’ll need to play from behind, hanging in there against a stronger opponent for a full four quarters and hoping to put himself in position for a game-winning kick as time runs out. Then the nightmare will belong to Charlie Crist.

http://nrd.nationalreview.com/article/? ... lhOTUzOGE=
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Wed Oct 28, 2009 12:24 pm

National Review ran a nice story on Rubio a few weeks ago. Rubio embodies the large groundswell of conservative/traditionalist/libertarian dissaffection with the Republican Party that has mushroomed over the past five years. Crist embodies a Republican Party that does the bidding of powerful elites and deserves to lose. Rubio offers not only a smart and sincere new direction, but what I can only hope turns into a dramatic revolution against the Republican Party from within and from without.
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Teresa B » Sun Nov 01, 2009 7:55 am

Unfortunately, Rubio is all for oil drilling off our precious Gulf Coast and development at all costs, which means he may well end up elected by Floridians who are understandably scared by the recession, and erroneously believe we can reap significant benefits from the continuation of wanton destruction of our environment. Unfortunately (again), most constituents don't read far enough to see that we will ultimately ruin our tourism-based economy and further disrupt the delicate Floridan aquifer, while the financial benefits will, as usual, go not to the public, but to restoke the greed of developers and those who profit from the oil industry.

I don't know who would be the worse Senator for our state, Rubio or Crist, but hey, North Carolina beckons! (Yes, I know, nasty politics and environmental rape are happening there too, but I can dream about sitting on my back porch and gazing at the mountains, can't I? :) )

Tereas
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Sun Nov 01, 2009 11:50 am

Teresa B wrote:Unfortunately, Rubio is all for oil drilling off our precious Gulf Coast and development at all costs, which means he may well end up elected by Floridians who are understandably scared by the recession, and erroneously believe we can reap significant benefits from the continuation of wanton destruction of our environment. Unfortunately (again), most constituents don't read far enough to see that we will ultimately ruin our tourism-based economy and further disrupt the delicate Floridan aquifer, while the financial benefits will, as usual, go not to the public, but to restoke the greed of developers and those who profit from the oil industry.

I don't know who would be the worse Senator for our state, Rubio or Crist, but hey, North Carolina beckons! (Yes, I know, nasty politics and environmental rape are happening there too, but I can dream about sitting on my back porch and gazing at the mountains, can't I? :) )

Tereas
Your comments reflect the misinformed hysteria plaguing the issue if drilling. The processes we use are relatively clean and unobtrusive. The shrill denunciation of drilling from the more irresponsible segments of the environmental movement reflects their detachment from good science and public policy reasoning. One of the consequences from the near ban on drilling is dramatically increased reliance on foreign oil. Another, is the ceding of large numbers of jobs and economic growth to other nations. Yet another consequence of the near ban is shifting a large chunk of oil production from relatively clean American production to much more environmentally destructive foreign production. This isn't the first, or even the 10th time, the "environmental movement" has contributed to the opposite of what they publicly espouse. :(

While you are at it, read Sarah Palin's recent article on drilling. It's in the latest adition of National Review, and she posted it to her Facebook account. Her policy recommendations are far more intelligent than anything coming from the current administration.....
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Teresa B » Sun Nov 01, 2009 1:32 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Teresa
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Sun Nov 01, 2009 1:54 pm

Teresa B wrote::lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Teresa
Alas, the final shrieking bouts of laughter will come from the various nations growing their economies with the proceeds from drilling off our coasts.........
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Corlyss_D » Sun Nov 01, 2009 5:24 pm

Teresa B wrote:Unfortunately, Rubio is all for oil drilling off our precious Gulf Coast and development at all costs, which means he may well end up elected by Floridians who are understandably scared by the recession, and erroneously believe we can reap significant benefits from the continuation of wanton destruction of our environment.
So you'd rather the Chinese and the Venezuelans and the Russians drilled there while we continue to splurge billions we don't have on silly, dead-end, boutique energy proposals, which when push comes to shove, ecothugs will not permit to go forward anyway. I don't know how long it is going to take the leftists' fellow travelers in environmentalism's rank-and-file to wake up to the awareness that the ecothugs don't want any cheap energy, period. In fact, they don't want any energy sources, period. Their agenda is nothing short of the wholesale destruction of 2/3rds of extant humanity to . . . "save the planet?" I don't think so. It will be much easier for them to run the show with far fewer people to object to what they are doing.
Unfortunately (again), most constituents don't read far enough to see that we will ultimately ruin our tourism-based economy and further disrupt the delicate Floridan aquifer, while the financial benefits will, as usual, go not to the public, but to restoke the greed of developers and those who profit from the oil industry.
So what's wrong with natgas? Oh, right! Environmentalists won't let us have that either, and the coal lobby does their dirty work for them.
I don't know who would be the worse Senator for our state, Rubio or Crist, but hey, North Carolina beckons! (Yes, I know, nasty politics and environmental rape are happening there too,
God, Teresa! You have all the mantras down pat, including the language abuse of evocative imagery like "rape." :roll: Gimme a f'ing break!
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Teresa B » Sun Nov 01, 2009 7:29 pm

I used the term "raping the environment" because it is a well-used phrase by natives of Asheville, N.C. when speaking of several large developments that literally clear-cut trees off a couple of the scenic mountains just outside of the city. I do think it fits, though. For the life of me, it's hard to understand the logic behind destroying the very environment we live in just to satisfy greed.

There has been plenty of research on oil drilling off the Gulf Coast of Florida. It shows no possible profits, even if they do find deposits, for at least ten years. Then the profits will not all be directed at Florida, but much will go on the international market. The amounts of oil, even if better than expected, will be a drop in the bucket compared to world daily oil use. There have indeed been damaging spills in the gulf, and oil produced off our coast would be shipped, as there is no pipeline now. There are no refineries in Florida. If there is a major spill (and we do have major hurricanes too), it is estimated it could take 10 years for the environmental impact to dissipate.

To my understanding, other nations are looking at drilling off Cuba and the Bahamas. Of course the Keys are in the vicinity. So, if they are looking to help ruin the local ecosystem, we should join in and help the whole ruination along, just to reap some profits? Great reasoning! We can't prevent other countries from drilling any more than we can keep China from polluting the air, but guess what--I hear China is actually going "green" now. What we need to do is convince all of 'em that less use and not more drilling is the answer.

Not even considering the impact on the ecosystem (and yes, believe it or not, there are delicate balances to the ecosystem that can be disrupted to far-reaching effects), the negative impact on tourism, the major industry of this state, could be far worse than the negative impact of not getting whatever pittance we would get from oil drilling. Texas gulf beaches are disgusting (I have walked on the beach in Galveston, and the tar balls are not appealing). We have beautiful white sand beaches here at the moment, a huge attraction to tourists, especially in the panhandle--where they are drooling over the prospect of drilling--and why the people whom we have elected to govern and represent us can't see beyond their own immediate self-interest in order to keep this state from its already progressing decline is beyond me.

And what happened to researching ways of utilizing less oil, instead of feeding our "addiction" (Bush's term!) and making it at least seem less necessary to find better energy sources?

Don't get me started.
Teresa
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by RebLem » Sat May 08, 2010 3:48 am

I have read some posts in the thread ANGER, and I found the posts trashing Teresa B particularly annoying. I thought it would be a good idea to ressurect this thread so people could read her posts and those of those who called her ignorant and alarmist. Now, in the light of what is happening in the Gulf of Mexico, I think hers was the voice of reason, and at times the only one.

I wonder what will happen when we have an oil slick off the coast of North Carolina meeting up with the methane laden runoff from massive North Carolina pig superfarms. We may soon find out.
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by keaggy220 » Sat May 08, 2010 6:12 am

RebLem wrote:I have read some posts in the thread ANGER, and I found the posts trashing Teresa B particularly annoying. I thought it would be a good idea to ressurect this thread so people could read her posts and those of those who called her ignorant and alarmist. Now, in the light of what is happening in the Gulf of Mexico, I think hers was the voice of reason, and at times the only one.

I wonder what will happen when we have an oil slick off the coast of North Carolina meeting up with the methane laden runoff from massive North Carolina pig superfarms. We may soon find out.
Airplanes crash and kill people occasionally - should we stop flying? :roll:

Yes and if we don't drill everyone will follow our supposed moral high ground lead and discontinue as well. :roll: This strategy is becoming so embarrassingly infantile.

Oil spills are going to happen occasionally. We need to agree on clean up strategies when spills occur and react efficiently when spills happen.
"I guess we're all, or most of us, the wards of the nineteenth-century sciences which denied existence of anything it could not reason or explain. The things we couldn't explain went right on but not with our blessing... So many old and lovely things are stored in the world's attic, because we don't want them around us and we don't dare throw them out."
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Sat May 08, 2010 11:47 am

Alas, Reblem, Your mind works like that of a 14 year old girl. The problem with the way millions of people think is that they don't actually rationally analyze things. What exactly is the environmental comparison point from which the occasional spill/dump/blow up or other disaster is to be compared? The Soviet Union where the factories were dirty and the air was polluted? Chinese cities, where a brief stay will have you coughing up soot for months? Or perhaps India, where diarreah and the ill-effects of all manners of food and environmental contaminants greet you at every corner?

The fact is that you and Teresa are perfect specimens of the kinds of emotionally drawn reasoning and alarmism substitutes for rational analysis. I suggest that you and your fellow Al Gore swooners go read some Julian Simon.
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by RebLem » Sat May 08, 2010 4:25 pm

keaggy220 wrote: Airplanes crash and kill people occasionally - should we stop flying? :roll:

Yes and if we don't drill everyone will follow our supposed moral high ground lead and discontinue as well. :roll: This strategy is becoming so embarrassingly infantile.

Oil spills are going to happen occasionally. We need to agree on clean up strategies when spills occur and react efficiently when spills happen.
No, we should not stop flying. I know that some are using this incident to suggest a return to the policy of a complete ban on new offshore drilling. Let me say here and now that I am not one of them. I know that was not clear from my previous post, but I am not. And we need not so much to agree on cleanup strategies, but on preventative strategies. We need to insist on the installation of acoustic valves. Yes, they cost a half mil a shot. But they also preseve the possibility that we might still be able to order blackened redfish is a restaurant without having to answer the additional question: regular or unleaded?

And do I ask the world to follow our moral lead? Sadly, no. I ask us to follow the moral lead of most of the rest of the world, including Brazil and Norway, which already require acoustic valves. The fact that drilling still goes on there is demonstration enough that it can be done profitably at current world prices even with the additional restrictions.

It is keaggy's persuasive strategy, not my response to this crisis, which is embarrassingly infantile. He seems to have much less faith than I in the free market. If the United States, as one of the world's leading oil producers, puts its weight behind the moral lead of smaller producers like Brazil and Norway, the brightest engineering minds will apply themselves to finding ways to make acoustic valves less complicated and less expensive because they will have a greater economic incentive to do so. It is embarrassingly naive of keaggy to ignore that possibility.

Finally, I hope the posters in the ANGER thread will accept and be heartened by the fact that I have felt chastened by their implied criticism. I know that a fair amount of that criticism was intended for me, though I was not specifically mentioned. I hope they will note that keaggy attempted to push many of my well known buttons, and to win his argument not with reason, but by provoking an angry response. I hope they will also note I ain't takin' the bait this time.
Last edited by RebLem on Sat May 08, 2010 7:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Florida Senate Race

Post by RebLem » Sat May 08, 2010 4:45 pm

Cyril Ignatius wrote:Alas, Reblem, Your mind works like that of a 14 year old girl.
Some of what I said in my response to keaggy applies here, especially the last paragraph. If keaggy was pushing the buttons on a Hammond organ, Cyril is using all the stops on a big Marcussen. In his very first sentence, he attempts to exploit any sexist and/or reverse agist prejudices I might have, as well as showing an unjustified contempt for the cognitive and expressive powers of a fair number of young teen girls--Anne Frank, for just one.
Cyril Ignatius wrote:The problem with the way millions of people think is that they don't actually rationally analyze things. What exactly is the environmental comparison point from which the occasional spill/dump/blow up or other disaster is to be compared? The Soviet Union where the factories were dirty and the air was polluted? Chinese cities, where a brief stay will have you coughing up soot for months? Or perhaps India, where diarreah and the ill-effects of all manners of food and environmental contaminants greet you at every corner?
I answered that in my last post. The "environmental comparison point" here is Brazil and Norway and most of the rest of the world, which, unlike us, insist on the use of acoustic valves. When we have accepted their moral lead on this issue, perhaps we will be in a more secure moral position to talk to the Brazilians about preserving the Amazon rainforest.
Cyril Ignatius wrote:The fact is that you and Teresa are perfect specimens of the kinds of emotionally drawn reasoning and alarmism substitutes for rational analysis. I suggest that you and your fellow Al Gore swooners go read some Julian Simon.
Oh, THIS organ is enough to blow out the stained glass windows in the Cathedral of Chartres!
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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