Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

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Ralph
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Ralph » Tue Mar 09, 2010 10:51 pm

I wouldn't knowingly eat either but in many Asian countries these animals are a staple part of the diet and they have no comprehension of how so many of us regard dogs and cats.
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by BWV 1080 » Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:00 pm

I don't understand the economics of raising predators for meat

because of the high population density and difference in yields between land dedicated for intensive agriculture and pasture, meat has been traditionally scarce in most of the far east, which is why all manner of animals are part of traditional cuisines

but to raise a dog or cat for food, you have to feed him meat from something else that you could have eaten yourself and the conversion is of course inefficient - so there is no real argument from necessity for the practice

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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:30 pm

BWV 1080 wrote:I don't understand the economics of raising predators for meat

because of the high population density and difference in yields between land dedicated for intensive agriculture and pasture, meat has been traditionally scarce in most of the far east, which is why all manner of animals are part of traditional cuisines

but to raise a dog or cat for food, you have to feed him meat from something else that you could have eaten yourself and the conversion is of course inefficient - so there is no real argument from necessity for the practice
Much of it is based in superstitious nonsense, like traditional medicines, or gereations of cultural bullsh*it says "eating this will make you stronger, guarantee you lots of sons, improve your sex life, or stop your hair from falling out." My apologies to any traditionalists out there who believe such folklore.
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Carnivorous Sheep » Wed Mar 10, 2010 12:21 am

Those who readily denounce eating X animal tend to be largely hypocritical.

An Indian would be appalled if he strolled into an American steakhouse, for example.

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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by living_stradivarius » Wed Mar 10, 2010 12:55 am

Carnivorous Sheep wrote:Those who readily denounce eating X animal tend to be largely hypocritical.

An Indian would be appalled if he strolled into an American steakhouse, for example.
Agreed, even if it comes from a Carivorous Sheep :lol:
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by living_stradivarius » Wed Mar 10, 2010 12:56 am

BWV 1080 wrote:I don't understand the economics of raising predators for meat

because of the high population density and difference in yields between land dedicated for intensive agriculture and pasture, meat has been traditionally scarce in most of the far east, which is why all manner of animals are part of traditional cuisines

but to raise a dog or cat for food, you have to feed him meat from something else that you could have eaten yourself and the conversion is of course inefficient - so there is no real argument from necessity for the practice
Cats do catch mice on their own...
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Mar 10, 2010 12:59 am

Carnivorous Sheep wrote:Those who readily denounce eating X animal tend to be largely hypocritical.
They are usually thinking about their family pet. I'm told around here where kids do 4-H projects all the time, the trick is not to allow the kids to name the animals, resulting in the "petification" of an animal destined for slaughter. I could no more eat something I'd looked into the eyes of than I could fly to the moon.
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Mar 10, 2010 1:03 am

Animal welfare in China

Off the menu

Feb 25th 2010 | BEIJING
From The Economist print edition


The right to eat cats and dogs is under threat

AT THE National People’s Congress (see main story), the Communist Party decides what laws to draft and when they get passed. But public pressure is beginning to count, too. An attempt to persuade the Congress to ban the eating of dog- and cat-meat has captivated the Chinese press and caused an uproar.

A proposed animal-rights law, circulated in draft last September by Chinese activists and legal experts, would be the first of its kind in a country where animal welfare rarely seems a priority. Pigs destined for slaughter are often seen crammed excruciatingly tightly in cages on the backs of lorries. In safari parks visitors happily pay to dangle live chickens into lions’ dens, or even to have a live calf dragged by its legs behind a jeep past ravenous tigers. But a fast-growing middle class, despite enjoying gory outings, is also fond of pet dogs and cats.

This creates conflict with ancient eating habits. Dogs are a popular dish in many parts of China, not least among ethnic Koreans in the north-east. Dog restaurants are also common in Beijing. Many believe that eating dog helps keep the human body warm in winter. Cats are popular in southern China. The sweet-tasting meat has been served to your correspondent, diced into small cubes reassembled in feline form with fur-stripped paws sticking in the air. The wretchedness of its foreshortened life was left to the imagination.

Dogs were once banned in many urban areas, but in recent years the government has caved in to soaring demand. For each household Beijing still has a one-dog policy and decrees that they must not be taller than 35cm (14 inches). They are nonetheless ubiquitous.

The proposed law would make the “illegal consumption or sale” of dog- or cat-meat punishable by a fine of up to 5,000 yuan ($730) or imprisonment for up to 15 days. But opponents are still many and vociferous both in the press and online. Dog-eating, they argue, is a time-honoured tradition and China is not yet ready for Western-style prissiness about consuming such animals. Perhaps, they suggest hopefully, the word “illegal” could be taken to mean that there might still be a legal way of killing cats and dogs for the table. The Congress admitted two years ago that better laws were needed to prevent cruelty to animals. But this one is not yet on the agenda.

Copyright © 2010 The Economist Newspaper and The Economist Group. All rights reserved.
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by living_stradivarius » Wed Mar 10, 2010 3:59 am

Plenty of dog owners here.

There's a stray dog in my neighborhood that wanders the streets at night, presumably looking for food. Also quite a few cats that whine loudly at night. Been going on for months. They haven't disappeared yet...
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Chalkperson » Wed Mar 10, 2010 10:56 am

I went to one in Canton in southern China back in 1985, it's the most disturbing place I have ever been to, they were skinning cats alive, also, we were warned numerous times not to eat "Mixed Meat" if we saw it on any of the local Menu's...I still have occasional flashbacks to what we saw that day...
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Cyril Ignatius » Fri Mar 12, 2010 5:47 pm

The Chinese callous treatment of animals is well-documented, but sadly, rarely discussed. Only a truly sick society would treat animals the way they do. And we ought to explore avenues to really confront them on this.
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Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Corlyss_D » Fri Mar 12, 2010 6:45 pm

Cyril Ignatius wrote: Only a truly sick society would treat animals the way they do.
Now now! It's only cultural differences and not really ours to judge, you know.
And we ought to explore avenues to really confront them on this.
Let's get them to stop supplying nuclear technology to North Korea and Iran first. Then we can worry about their human rights problems that so much of the world thinks is important for the west to clean up but rarely criticizes real and important tyrants for, and THEN we can focus on their horrid treament of animals.
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Brendan

Re: Inside the cat and dog meat market in China

Post by Brendan » Fri Mar 12, 2010 8:38 pm

I would guess some here might turn their noses up at Kangaroo Burgers, Emu or Crocodile steak. We don't eat edangered species or dolphins or cute things like koalas, but we've more emus, roos (and feral rubbish like camels, goats and pigs) than we can handle, and with the price of beef now what it is, why we don't eat more kangaroo is beyond my ken.

Cultural dietry taboos and enthusiasms run deep. A Scottish friend pines for good haggis.

Animal activists are usually just expressing their religious instinct in PC form.

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