Dick Cavett

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John F
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Dick Cavett

Post by John F » Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:16 pm

Dick Cavett was featured in a segment on CBS's Sunday Morning last weekend, and it was good to see him after all this time. And to find out that he writes occasional opinion pieces for the New York Times. Most recently there've been appreciations of the late Tony Curtis and Eddie Fisher:

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/ca ... ck-cavett/

Mostly he writes about show business and other light topics, but the Sarah Palin phenomenon provoked him into a piece called "The Wild Wordsmith of Wasilla," shortly after Election Day in 2008, in which he asked,
I’d love to hear what you think has caused such an alarming number of our fellow Americans to fall into the Sarah Swoon.

Could the willingness to crown one who seems to have no first language have anything to do with the oft-lamented fact that we seem to be alone among nations in having made the word “intellectual” an insult? (And yet…and yet…we did elect Obama. Surely not despite his brains.)
And that's a very good question.
John Francis

HoustonDavid
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by HoustonDavid » Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:53 pm

Can't immediately think of two more polar opposites than Barack Obama and Sarah
Palin. It is truly bewildering that the one has now received the other's popularity with
the American public, in a short two years. The world must be puzzled. I know I am.
"May You be born in interesting (maybe confusing?) times" - Chinese Proverb (or Curse)

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Nov 12, 2010 7:00 am

HoustonDavid wrote:Can't immediately think of two more polar opposites than Barack Obama and Sarah
Palin. It is truly bewildering that the one has now received the other's popularity with
the American public, in a short two years. The world must be puzzled. I know I am.
I keep telling everyone, it's the Ronald Reagan scenario playing itself out all over again.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Barry
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Barry » Fri Nov 12, 2010 8:15 am

jbuck919 wrote:
HoustonDavid wrote:Can't immediately think of two more polar opposites than Barack Obama and Sarah
Palin. It is truly bewildering that the one has now received the other's popularity with
the American public, in a short two years. The world must be puzzled. I know I am.
I keep telling everyone, it's the Ronald Reagan scenario playing itself out all over again.
And I can imagine the looks you get. :wink:

They've got many Dick Cavett show clips on Youtube. There are some very funny ones with Woody Allen.
"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee." - Abraham Lincoln

"Although prepared for martyrdom, I preferred that it be postponed." - Winston Churchill

"Before I refuse to take your questions, I have an opening statement." - Ronald Reagan

http://www.davidstuff.com/political/wmdquotes.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pbp0hur ... re=related

piston
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by piston » Fri Nov 12, 2010 8:31 am

The phenomenon is not so mysterious -- a combination of populism with libertarianism. She ain't the first populist in US history yu know! FDR prevented them from taking over this country's destiny during the Great Depression. Unfortunately today, either the public is much less patient with government than in the 1930s or Obama just ain't FDR. I think it's more of the former scenario. FDR maintained popular support in a much worse crisis than our current one. People could wait back then; they apparently cannot now.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

piston
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by piston » Fri Nov 12, 2010 8:53 am

And if I am not mistaken about matters of the intellect, the issue in the 1930s wasn't people dropping out of High School. Rather, it was people trying to get into High School. Perhaps a third of WWII conscripts, in both USA and UK, could not write a letter home. And, yet, they apparently could understand the difference between a FDR plan and a foolish populist rant.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by John F » Fri Nov 12, 2010 8:58 am

Hey, anybody here interested in Dick Cavett?
John Francis

Cosima___J
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Cosima___J » Fri Nov 12, 2010 9:16 am

Looks like every thread somehow gets turned into a political slugfest.

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by HoustonDavid » Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:03 am

You think contrasting Barack Obama with Sarah Palin somehow won't turn into
a political slugfest? I do remember the topic is Dick Cavett, but the clip is about
the contrast between Palin's lack of a primary language and Obama's intellectual
approach to everything. In our current political climate, that would automatically
turn into a slugfest almost anywhere.

John, by the "Ronald Reagan scenario" do you mean his low popularity surging to
a second term, or something else? I hope you are right if my assumption is correct.
"May You be born in interesting (maybe confusing?) times" - Chinese Proverb (or Curse)

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by johnQpublic » Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:16 am

HoustonDavid wrote: by the "Ronald Reagan scenario" do you mean his low popularity surging to a second term, or something else?
My intrepretation was something else. Namely as Gimme Jimmy's administration wobbled, people began taking a second and more serious look at Reagan.
Image

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:29 am

John F wrote:Hey, anybody here interested in Dick Cavett?
John, you're the one who decided that the excerpt worth noting was a (well-deserved) jibe at Sarah Palin. Why should we miss the opportunity? Actually, I read his item on Tony Curtis and then watched the excerpt from the program, and I have to say that where he had led us to expect a turning point in the history of entertainment journalism I found a very ordinary, which is to say boring, celebrity interview. Maybe the problem was that Curtis hadn't been sterilized (or was that David Frost?).

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by John F » Fri Nov 12, 2010 12:12 pm

The reason I quoted that bit was the delicious description of Sarah Palin seeming to have no first language. Only Dick Cavett would think to say such a thing. And he mentions the anti-intellectual vein in the American public at large, which might be worth discussing - I've brought it up now and then in the Pub, but only I seem to find it interesting, let alone troubling. What I didn't expect was that the same old stuff about Sarah Palin would be trotted out yet another time, ignoring the subject of this thread altogether.

The "Sunday Morning" reporter insisted on labeling Cavett himself as an intellectual, which he always bridles at and courteously declined to agree with. The point about Cavett was that he was unafraid, indeed eager, to bring intellectuals, literary writers, and more-than-show-biz performers into his various shows, a rarity in American commercial TV then and now, and to converse intelligently but noncompetitively with them - even to face up to them when necessary, as in his sharp and hilarious rejoinder to a tipsy and pugnacious Norman Mailer while Gore Vidal sat in the other chair and managed not to laugh out loud.

Just naming those names is enough to support my point, but I'll name two more from Cavett's half-hour PBS show. It was he who made me aware of the Australian-British critic Clive James, while James was still reviewing British TV with unequalled style and humor before he became something of a TV celebrity himself. And it was Cavett who spent a fascinating half an hour with John Gielgud, and at one point got him to recite A.E. Housman's "Bredon Hill" from "A Shropshire Lad." The poem wasn't familiar to me and moved me to tears - and also Gielgud himself, as it happened. If anything of the kind occurred in all those years of the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, I never saw it.

Come to think of it, I'll emulate Cavett and make a space for the poem, though unfortunately without the extraordinary eloquence of Gielgud's voice and style:

Bredon Hill

In summertime on Bredon
The bells they sound so clear;
Round both the shires they ring them
In steeples far and near,
A happy noise to hear.

Here of a Sunday morning
My love and I would lie,
And see the coloured counties,
And hear the larks so high
About us in the sky.

The bells would ring to call her
In valleys miles away:
"Come all to church, good people;
Good people, come and pray."
But here my love would stay.

And I would turn and answer
Among the springing thyme,
"Oh, peal upon our wedding,
And we will hear the chime,
And come to church in time."

But when the snows at Christmas
On Bredon top were strown,
My love rose up so early
And stole out unbeknown
And went to church alone.

They tolled the one bell only,
Groom there was none to see,
The mourners followed after,
And so to church went she,
And would not wait for me.

The bells they sound on Bredon
And still the steeples hum.
"Come all to church, good people,"—
Oh, noisy bells, be dumb;
I hear you, I will come.
John Francis

Agnes Selby
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Agnes Selby » Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:18 pm

Its good of you John Francis to quote some worthy poetry
instead of Sarah Palin. It seems to me, you and some other gents
on this board are truly obssessed with her. What a pity she
was not born a Liberal! :wink: :|

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Cosima___J » Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:30 pm

Agnes, how about this scenario:

Maybe some of those gents have secretly got the hots for Ms. Palin. They can't quit talking about her, but would be embarassed if their liberal friends got wind of their pathetic longing. So they disparage her publicly, but only because it gives them the opportunity to keep typing those letters S-A-R-A-H P-A-L-I-N

As Len would say, fleeing


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by karlhenning » Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:44 pm

John F wrote:The reason I quoted that bit was the delicious description of Sarah Palin seeming to have no first language. Only Dick Cavett would think to say such a thing. And he mentions the anti-intellectual vein in the American public at large, which might be worth discussing - I've brought it up now and then in the Pub, but only I seem to find it interesting, let alone troubling.
Yes, a "reverse snobbery" no great distance from popular distaste for classical music (I mean, the many people who haven't actually heard any of it, to speak of, but are sure they can't stand it).

Of course, it could be that they've heard Telemann . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Agnes Selby » Fri Nov 12, 2010 4:01 pm

Cosima___J wrote:Agnes, how about this scenario:

Maybe some of those gents have secretly got the hots for Ms. Palin. They can't quit talking about her, but would be embarassed if their liberal friends got wind of their pathetic longing. So they disparage her publicly, but only because it gives them the opportunity to keep typing those letters S-A-R-A-H P-A-L-I-N

As Len would say, fleeing


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Well, you see, Sarah Palin thrives on such controversy. It makes her look
more "folksy" just as Obama thrives on being called an "Intellectual". He
even has a Nobel Prize to prove it! As you can see they have something in
common - their egos.

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Nov 12, 2010 4:02 pm

karlhenning wrote:Yes, a "reverse snobbery" no great distance from popular distaste for classical music (I mean, the many people who haven't actually heard any of it, to speak of, but are sure they can't stand it).
I don't know. One of my former students and Facebook friends got his Ph.D. in physics from U Va, another is finishing up her Ph.D. in math from Cornell (brag, brag). Deep thinkers both, interests in music exclusively popular. It's nothing they got from me.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by karlhenning » Fri Nov 12, 2010 4:06 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
karlhenning wrote:Yes, a "reverse snobbery" no great distance from popular distaste for classical music (I mean, the many people who haven't actually heard any of it, to speak of, but are sure they can't stand it).
I don't know. One of my former students and Facebook friends got his Ph.D. in physics from U Va, another is finishing up her Ph.D. in math from Cornell (brag, brag). Deep thinkers both, interests in music exclusively popular. It's nothing they got from me.
I wasn't particularly clear, but no, I don't think that a highly developed intelligence necessarily goes with a preference for classical music.

Then, too, there is the matter of different types of intelligence . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

Agnes Selby
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Agnes Selby » Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:07 pm

karlhenning wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
karlhenning wrote:Yes, a "reverse snobbery" no great distance from popular distaste for classical music (I mean, the many people who haven't actually heard any of it, to speak of, but are sure they can't stand it).
I don't know. One of my former students and Facebook friends got his Ph.D. in physics from U Va, another is finishing up her Ph.D. in math from Cornell (brag, brag). Deep thinkers both, interests in music exclusively popular. It's nothing they got from me.
I wasn't particularly clear, but no, I don't think that a highly developed intelligence necessarily goes with a preference for classical music.

Then, too, there is the matter of different types of intelligence . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
What I have gathered from these pages is the following:

In the USA, intelligence is judged by political party affiliations.

If you happen to be a Liberal, your intelligence cannot be questioned.
You are smart, worldly, educated and racially tolerant.

If you are a Republican, you are stupid, dangerous, uneducated,
racist and anti-American.

This concept divides your nation and in fact, you don't really need outside
enemies. You are quite capable in destroying yourselves bit by bit.

...and you can't blame it all on Bush...

dulcinea
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by dulcinea » Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:20 pm

In what way has the slick intellectual verborrhea of BHO Plenty O' Nothing benefitted the country that he is supposed to lead?
FACTA, NON VERBA=DEEDS, NOT WORDS are what really count!!!
Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord! Alleluya!

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:51 pm

Agnes Selby wrote:
karlhenning wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
karlhenning wrote:Yes, a "reverse snobbery" no great distance from popular distaste for classical music (I mean, the many people who haven't actually heard any of it, to speak of, but are sure they can't stand it).
I don't know. One of my former students and Facebook friends got his Ph.D. in physics from U Va, another is finishing up her Ph.D. in math from Cornell (brag, brag). Deep thinkers both, interests in music exclusively popular. It's nothing they got from me.
I wasn't particularly clear, but no, I don't think that a highly developed intelligence necessarily goes with a preference for classical music.

Then, too, there is the matter of different types of intelligence . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
What I have gathered from these pages is the following:

In the USA, intelligence is judged by political party affiliations.

If you happen to be a Liberal, your intelligence cannot be questioned.
You are smart, worldly, educated and racially tolerant.

If you are a Republican, you are stupid, dangerous, uneducated,
racist and anti-American.

This concept divides your nation and in fact, you don't really need outside
enemies. You are quite capable in destroying yourselves bit by bit.

...and you can't blame it all on Bush...
Now maybe John F. will understand why people here don't want to discuss anti-intellectualism in the U.S.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Cosima___J
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Cosima___J » Fri Nov 12, 2010 6:04 pm

Agnes, you definitely deserve the Post of the Day award. You can add that to your collection of other distinguished honors. You've nailed it (or at least that's what the Dems seem to think).

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Agnes Selby » Fri Nov 12, 2010 6:54 pm

Cosima___J wrote:Agnes, you definitely deserve the Post of the Day award. You can add that to your collection of other distinguished honors. You've nailed it (or at least that's what the Dems seem to think).
Thank you, Cosi! As you can see, my opinion is underlined by JohnBuck's
post above.

Guitarist
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Guitarist » Fri Nov 12, 2010 7:37 pm

I loved his show, and the fact that he could hold his own with anyone, from Jimi Hendrix, Birgit Nilsson, to Gore Vidal!

Agnes Selby
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Agnes Selby » Fri Nov 12, 2010 7:56 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Agnes Selby wrote:
karlhenning wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
karlhenning wrote:Yes, a "reverse snobbery" no great distance from popular distaste for classical music (I mean, the many people who haven't actually heard any of it, to speak of, but are sure they can't stand it).
I don't know. One of my former students and Facebook friends got his Ph.D. in physics from U Va, another is finishing up her Ph.D. in math from Cornell (brag, brag). Deep thinkers both, interests in music exclusively popular. It's nothing they got from me.
I wasn't particularly clear, but no, I don't think that a highly developed intelligence necessarily goes with a preference for classical music.

Then, too, there is the matter of different types of intelligence . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
What I have gathered from these pages is the following:

In the USA, intelligence is judged by political party affiliations.

If you happen to be a Liberal, your intelligence cannot be questioned.
You are smart, worldly, educated and racially tolerant.

If you are a Republican, you are stupid, dangerous, uneducated,
racist and anti-American.

This concept divides your nation and in fact, you don't really need outside
enemies. You are quite capable in destroying yourselves bit by bit.

...and you can't blame it all on Bush...
Now maybe John F. will understand why people here don't want to discuss anti-intellectualism in the U.S.
Dear Komrad Buckowsky,

If intellectualism depended on socialism, every Russian peasant would be a genius.

As it is, my father's lands in Czechoslovakia lay fallow after the Socialists took them away from him. Parcelled out to keen Socialist folk, the lands somehow did not prosper even when the Government took them back. Then, out of the blue, they wrote to my father in
Australia to come and reclaim his lands. Spend a bit of money and all will be well.

However, I did advise them that my father was dead and I found investing money
in their regime a little dubious.

Komrad, as much as you oppose private enterprise, the other has failed
and many countries are scrambling to get out from under the Socialist yoke.
However, who knows? You have, most probably, 2 more years with Obama and
he, under the Soros quidence, may well achieve the impossible.

Nazdravje, dear Komrad!

Agnes.

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by lennygoran » Sat Nov 13, 2010 8:04 am

>Maybe some of those gents have secretly got the hots for Ms. Palin. They can't quit talking about her, but would be embarassed if their liberal friends got wind of their pathetic longing. ..As Len would say, fleeing<

Ah, you caught me--I especially like her when she's fishing!

http://www.google.com/images?q=palin+fi ... 00&bih=357

Regards, Len :) :) :)

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by HoustonDavid » Sat Nov 13, 2010 1:37 pm

Agnes, don't the men in Australia subscribe to the same affliction as American men:
"Give me a beautiful, rich woman with no brains to challenge my superiority?"

I always thought the wish was nearly universal - except for me, of course.
"May You be born in interesting (maybe confusing?) times" - Chinese Proverb (or Curse)

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by Agnes Selby » Sat Nov 13, 2010 2:24 pm

HoustonDavid wrote:Agnes, don't the men in Australia subscribe to the same affliction as American men:
"Give me a beautiful, rich woman with no brains to challenge my superiority?"

I always thought the wish was nearly universal - except for me, of course.

I really don't know! I thought it was all about love!

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by karlhenning » Sat Nov 13, 2010 11:24 pm

Guitarist wrote:I loved his show, and the fact that he could hold his own with anyone, from Jimi Hendrix, Birgit Nilsson, to Gore Vidal!
Imagine my surprise a year or two ago when I found on YouTube:





Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by jack stowaway » Wed Nov 17, 2010 4:06 pm

John F wrote:The reason I quoted that bit was the delicious description of Sarah Palin seeming to have no first language. Only Dick Cavett would think to say such a thing. And he mentions the anti-intellectual vein in the American public at large, which might be worth discussing - I've brought it up now and then in the Pub, but only I seem to find it interesting, let alone troubling. What I didn't expect was that the same old stuff about Sarah Palin would be trotted out yet another time, ignoring the subject of this thread altogether.

The "Sunday Morning" reporter insisted on labeling Cavett himself as an intellectual, which he always bridles at and courteously declined to agree with. The point about Cavett was that he was unafraid, indeed eager, to bring intellectuals, literary writers, and more-than-show-biz performers into his various shows, a rarity in American commercial TV then and now, and to converse intelligently but noncompetitively with them - even to face up to them when necessary, as in his sharp and hilarious rejoinder to a tipsy and pugnacious Norman Mailer while Gore Vidal sat in the other chair and managed not to laugh out loud.

Just naming those names is enough to support my point, but I'll name two more from Cavett's half-hour PBS show. It was he who made me aware of the Australian-British critic Clive James, while James was still reviewing British TV with unequalled style and humor before he became something of a TV celebrity himself. And it was Cavett who spent a fascinating half an hour with John Gielgud, and at one point got him to recite A.E. Housman's "Bredon Hill" from "A Shropshire Lad." The poem wasn't familiar to me and moved me to tears - and also Gielgud himself, as it happened. If anything of the kind occurred in all those years of the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, I never saw it.

Come to think of it, I'll emulate Cavett and make a space for the poem, though unfortunately without the extraordinary eloquence of Gielgud's voice and style:

Bredon Hill

In summertime on Bredon
The bells they sound so clear;
Round both the shires they ring them
In steeples far and near,
A happy noise to hear.

Here of a Sunday morning
My love and I would lie,
And see the coloured counties,
And hear the larks so high
About us in the sky.

The bells would ring to call her
In valleys miles away:
"Come all to church, good people;
Good people, come and pray."
But here my love would stay.

And I would turn and answer
Among the springing thyme,
"Oh, peal upon our wedding,
And we will hear the chime,
And come to church in time."

But when the snows at Christmas
On Bredon top were strown,
My love rose up so early
And stole out unbeknown
And went to church alone.

They tolled the one bell only,
Groom there was none to see,
The mourners followed after,
And so to church went she,
And would not wait for me.

The bells they sound on Bredon
And still the steeples hum.
"Come all to church, good people,"—
Oh, noisy bells, be dumb;
I hear you, I will come.
Nice post, John. I wish that particular clip were availalbe on YouTube. I'd love to see it.

Someone once said that 'second-rate' poetry such as Houseman's often cut more deeply to a native English-speaker than Shakespeare or Milton but that it was quite impossible to explain (to a non-native speaker) why this should be so.

I'm sure you're aware that 'Bredon HIll' has been set to music several times. My favourite is Graham Peel's composition, sung by Thomas Allen. I couldn't find it on YouTube, but I did turn up the following, folk rendition, which might be worth a look/listen if only for the accompanying video of the Shropshire Landscape: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPVpWiySeFE

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by John F » Wed Nov 17, 2010 4:21 pm

I've heard one of the settings of "Bredon Hill," don't remember which, and felt it conveyed less of the poem's poignant feeling and its word-music than when Gielgud spoke it.
John Francis

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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by slofstra » Thu Nov 18, 2010 3:07 pm

Agnes Selby wrote:
karlhenning wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
karlhenning wrote:Yes, a "reverse snobbery" no great distance from popular distaste for classical music (I mean, the many people who haven't actually heard any of it, to speak of, but are sure they can't stand it).
I don't know. One of my former students and Facebook friends got his Ph.D. in physics from U Va, another is finishing up her Ph.D. in math from Cornell (brag, brag). Deep thinkers both, interests in music exclusively popular. It's nothing they got from me.
I wasn't particularly clear, but no, I don't think that a highly developed intelligence necessarily goes with a preference for classical music.

Then, too, there is the matter of different types of intelligence . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
What I have gathered from these pages is the following:

In the USA, intelligence is judged by political party affiliations.

If you happen to be a Liberal, your intelligence cannot be questioned.
You are smart, worldly, educated and racially tolerant.

If you are a Republican, you are stupid, dangerous, uneducated,
racist and anti-American.

This concept divides your nation and in fact, you don't really need outside
enemies. You are quite capable in destroying yourselves bit by bit.

...and you can't blame it all on Bush...
I thought you liked Republicans ....

slofstra
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by slofstra » Thu Nov 18, 2010 3:18 pm

John F wrote:Hey, anybody here interested in Dick Cavett?
LOL. I just watched a documentary on the life and career of Joni Mitchell. She wanted to perform at Woodstock, but for some reason was encouraged not to. She stayed at an apartment in NYC and wrote the song Woodstock while the festival was on, and her friends, Crosby, Still and Nash performed at the festival. The day after Woodstock they all hooked up on the Dick Cavett show. Don't they all look and sound goofy?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRLEVWR1jJk

karlhenning
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by karlhenning » Thu Nov 18, 2010 3:36 pm

Ian Anderson was saying in an interview that Jethro Tull were invited to play Woodstock, but they decided against it, felt it would too likely 'brand' them as 'a hippie band'.

Not that this happened with Crosby, Stills & Nash, of course . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

slofstra
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by slofstra » Fri Nov 19, 2010 9:25 am

karlhenning wrote:Ian Anderson was saying in an interview that Jethro Tull were invited to play Woodstock, but they decided against it, felt it would too likely 'brand' them as 'a hippie band'.

Not that this happened with Crosby, Stills & Nash, of course . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl
Woodstock certainly didn't hurt any band's aspirations. Where would Canned Heat be today without Woodstock? Exactly where they are? Maybe Anderson was right after all.

HoustonDavid
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by HoustonDavid » Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:23 am

What always amazes me about Woodstock was the genesis of the documentary
film: "Woodstock, 3 Days of Peace & Music" directed by Michael Wadleigh. It is
an extraordinary film, one of the best documentaries ever recorded IMO. How did
Wadleigh know in advance it would be such an event, then lug 4 or 5 huge cinematic
35mm cameras out to rural New York and lug them around in the rain (with his crew,
of course) and get the shots necessary to put together the film. There must have been
three cameras on Jimi Hendrix alone and the live cinematography is better than most
studio work done for music videos. Amazing, when you consider Wadleigh couldn't
have know what was about to transpire and what an iconic event Woodstock would
become. I have the director's cut of the film in my music cinema library, needless
to say.
"May You be born in interesting (maybe confusing?) times" - Chinese Proverb (or Curse)

John F
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Re: Dick Cavett

Post by John F » Fri Nov 19, 2010 4:31 pm

I suppose they went up to Woodstock to film what was clearly going to be quite a concert, with no idea that it might turn out to be something more.
John Francis

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