Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

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piston
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Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by piston » Fri Jul 10, 2015 4:57 pm

The current plan is to use the ten dollar bill to commemorate the centennial of women's (federal) voting rights, but Senator Susan Collins, of Maine, is proposing to feature a famous US woman on the twenty dollar bill to give that female image even greater circulation with ATM machines. She's championing Maine Senator Margaret Chase Smith. Other Mainers are pushing for Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins of New Deal fame.

Who would you like to see as the first famous woman on a U.S. bill?
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

John F
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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by John F » Sat Jul 11, 2015 5:39 am

Since the faces on American paper money almost never change, and the 20 dollar bill is so widely used, it's a hard call. Andrew Jackson, like Washington and Jefferson and Lincoln and Grant, was a president of the United States who made a difference; Benjamin Franklin is probably the most significant American never to be president; Alexander Hamilton is credited as the founder of the U.S.'s financial system, and thus maybe the most appropriate of all. What American woman has a résumé that even remotely compares with that? I can't think of any.

Margaret Chase Smith? Frances Perkins? Let's be serious. If any American woman has the stature and achievement - and recognition and staying power - to be thus immortalized, it's Eleanor Roosevelt. But I expect the Republicans in Congress wouldn't stand for that. Another, lesser candidate could be the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, Sandra Day O'Connor, but she wrote no memorable majority opinions that changed America. No, it's got to be Mrs. Roosevelt.

If, for once, the gummint decided to recognize achievements in other fields than politics, public affairs, and war, my candidate would be Marian Anderson, not only a great artist but a symbol of what's good about America. But America is too philistine, and I'm afraid still too racist, for that to happen.
John Francis

Ricordanza
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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by Ricordanza » Sat Jul 11, 2015 7:00 am

John F wrote:to recognize achievements in other fields than politics, public affairs, and war, my candidate would be Marian Anderson, not only a great artist but a symbol of what's good about America.
Excellent! I second that choice.

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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Jul 11, 2015 7:24 am

I haven't looked it up, but I imagine that Margaret Chase Smith was related to Salmon P.Chase, Secretary of the Treasury during the Civil War and later Chief Justice, who was on the now-defunct $10,000 bill. (His name, BTW, is pronounced like Solomon and not like the fish.) That's not a good reason for her to be on a US bank note, of course. I just thought I'd offer some information, trivia if you must, though my high school students are unlikely ever to have heard of Chase or Smith. Now answer this one: Why was there ever a denomination so big when $10,000 was a a lot of money? (In fact, there was also once a $100,000 bill.)

The obvious problem is that in recognizing women we are discovering that there have never been any in government whose accomplishments matches those on John's list. In other words, we will be honoring a woman because she is a woman, the same old same old of women's modern history. (Please note that jbuck did not say that women are incapable of such accomplishments, but they weren't in government when those [mostly] giants made their accomplishments.) So I suggest a blank cartouche on the "woman's money to symbolize what there should have been and might have been but never has been, and I'm only being half facetious.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
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piston
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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by piston » Sat Jul 11, 2015 8:11 am

Margaret Chase Smith, "The Lady of Maine," is not related to any former prominent U.S. officeholder. Her father was George Emery Chase, a barber from little Fairfield, Maine, and her grandfather was a civil engineer and Methodist preacher, the Reverend John Wesley Chase, of the same location. From a modest mill town in central Maine, Margaret's maternal ancestors were early French Canadian immigrants to Skowhegan:
Margaret's maternal grandfather, born Lambert Morin in 1843 at St. Georges, Quebec, Canada, came to Skowhegan as a child, probably as part of the massive emigration following a dramatic drop in Canadian wheat production. French Canadians fled south along the Canada road from Quebec to Skowhegan, dragging wagons, carts, and "slides" (a sort of buckboard called "slague" in French). Many arrived "in extreme destitution ... [with] their numerous children and scanty household goods." Most settled in a farmer's unused pasture north of town that came to be derisively called "Little Canada."
Smith married a divorcee, Clyde Smith, who was 21 years older and would rise politically from his town's selectman to a Republican Rep. in Washington. He suffered a heart attack and asked his wife to run for him in 1940. From there, Margaret Chase Smith never looked back, served as U.S. Representative for nine years and as US Senator for 24 years.

She was the first woman to serve in both houses of Congress, the first woman "to be placed in nomination for the presidency at a major party's convention" (in 1964), and is best remembered for her "Declaration of Conscience" against Jos McCarthy when a lot of male politicians, Democrats and Republicans alike, did not have the courage to challenge one of America's most notorious dictators.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

piston
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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by piston » Sat Jul 11, 2015 8:14 am

From what I heard on MPR yesterday, Harriet Tubman is currently one of the front runners for the ten dollar bill.
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

John F
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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by John F » Sat Jul 11, 2015 8:35 am

jbuck919 wrote:The obvious problem is that in recognizing women we are discovering that there have never been any in government whose accomplishments matches those on John's list.
Of course. American women couldn't even vote until 1920 - half a century after African American men were given full rights of citizenship by the 15th amendment to the Constitution. But not all the men on the currency are there because of their accomplishments in government. Benjamin Franklin's highest public offices were as postmaster of Philadelphia and ambassador to France. Women have risen higher than that in our public life.
jbuck919 wrote:In other words, we will be honoring a woman because she is a woman, the same old same old of women's modern history.
Sure, but why not? The gallery of dead white male politicians that is our currency doesn't necessarily honor high achievements or moral character either. Indeed, Andrew Jackson's presidency was mostly negative - vetoing the national bank, evicting Native Americans from their native lands, and so on. Washington and Jefferson were slave owners. The "qualifications" for this "honor" being so inconsistent and having no basis in law, I'm in favor of honoring a great American woman such as Eleanor Roosevelt because she was a woman, as well as because she was great.

The blank cartouche is a joke, and a bad joke at that. It rubs in the exclusion of American women from governance for most of American history though no fault of their own. If all the currency were redesigned to eliminate portraits of anybody, replacing them with other images as for example with the Euro, that would at least be gender-neutral. But of course that's not going to happen.
John Francis

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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Jul 11, 2015 9:11 am

Then I recommend Edith Wharton or, arguably, Emily Dickinson. They are writers as great as America has produced and (for different reasons) knowing commentators on the socioeconomics of their time.

http://www.inspirationalstories.com/poe ... ey-wealth/

Before you take me literally, you don't have to say it: They present the same problem as Marian Anderson Still, I could see Wharton being Secretary of Treasury or some other direct political actor, while Anderson....

But then, I wanted the holiday in January to be National Civil Rights Day instead of the annual Feast of Martin Luther King Jr. I suppose it's only human that people insist on personification.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by lennygoran » Sat Jul 11, 2015 3:30 pm

Carli lloyd-nj! Len [fleeing] :lol:

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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by RebLem » Sat Jul 11, 2015 3:31 pm

I suggest we take a more radical step. Take Washington off the dollar bill. Take Lincoln off both the penny and the $5 bill. Take Andrew Jackson off all US currency, as he destroyed Hamilton's banking system, which had brought stability, and ushered in almost a century of recurrent panics that destroyed American confidence in our monetary system, and instituted the spoils system, and showed dangerous contempt for the rulings of the Supreme Court. Then institute a new $20 bill honoring the Mount Rushmore presidents. That will take care of all the Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt lovers. Then you free up the $1 bill, the $5 bill, and the $10 bill. I suggest Sacajawea (put someone else on the dollar coin), Harriet Tubman, and one white guy--Thomas Alva Edison--to get the votes of the idiots who think we're marginalizing white people. No preference as to which persons for which bills. Maybe FDR for the dollar coin and Eleanor Roosevelt to replace her husband on the dime.
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jbuck919
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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Jul 11, 2015 6:53 pm

RebLem wrote:Take Andrew Jackson off all US currency, as he destroyed Hamilton's banking system, which had brought stability, and ushered in almost a century of recurrent panics that destroyed American confidence in our monetary system, and instituted the spoils system, and showed dangerous contempt for the rulings of the Supreme Court.
In all seriousness, Rob, do you sense an attempt by the Tea Party to get Reagan in quietly by the back door? If you can't get him on the currency, at least preserve the president who most stands for what they believe but who (they are too stupid to see) did the most damage, while getting rid of his opposite.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

piston
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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by piston » Sat Jul 11, 2015 7:11 pm

Jackson is a big target. I can imagine a pretty large and strong "rainbow coalition" against that president.

Reagan on a US bill, with his "Monopoly" face, would instantly conjure up fake money to my mind. :lol:
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by RebLem » Sat Jul 11, 2015 11:12 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
RebLem wrote:Take Andrew Jackson off all US currency, as he destroyed Hamilton's banking system, which had brought stability, and ushered in almost a century of recurrent panics that destroyed American confidence in our monetary system, and instituted the spoils system, and showed dangerous contempt for the rulings of the Supreme Court.
In all seriousness, Rob, do you sense an attempt by the Tea Party to get Reagan in quietly by the back door? If you can't get him on the currency, at least preserve the president who most stands for what they believe but who (they are too stupid to see) did the most damage, while getting rid of his opposite.
Put him on the penny. He left a lot of people penniless, so it seems appropriate.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

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Re: Woman on a US bill: which one do you vote for?

Post by Auntie Lynn » Tue Jul 14, 2015 9:15 am

Malala

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