After calling out NFL, Trump faces open contempt and defiance

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jserraglio
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After calling out NFL, Trump faces open contempt and defiance

Post by jserraglio » Sat Sep 23, 2017 7:50 pm

LA TIMES

President Trump has picked fights with two of the nation’s most popular professional sports leagues, setting off a Twitter war with top athletes who were quick to fight back in an extraordinary display of political trash-talking with thinly veiled racial undertones.
Even National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell jumped into the fray Saturday, criticizing Trump for “divisive comments” as some players responded on social media with much harsher language.
Basketball superstar LeBron James called Trump a “bum” and said that “going to the White House was a great honor until you showed up!”
The battle began Friday night, when Trump publicly criticizedAfrican American football players, following an example set last season by quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who have been kneeling during the national anthem to protest the nation’s racial disparities.
Trump urged NFL owners to fire the players and encouraged fans to walk out of games in their own protest.
“That’s a total disrespect of our heritage. That’s a total disrespect of everything that we stand for,” Trump told a rally Friday in Alabama, where he was campaigning for Republican Sen. Luther Strange.
“Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, you’d say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He’s fired,” Trump said to loud applause.
Trump followed that up Saturday morning by taking to Twitter to apparently withdraw his invitation to the National Basketball Assn. champion Golden State Warriors to visit the White House, singling out the team’s star, Stephen Curry, for “hesitating” about accepting the offer.
Trump’s move appeared preemptory, as the team was expected to vote to decline the traditional White House offer extended to sports champions after Curry said Friday he would oppose a visit. It was unclear Saturday whether Trump disinvited the whole team or just Curry.
The Golden State Warriors announced later Saturday that they decided to skip the traditional championship visit to the White House while acknowledging that Trump made it clear they were not invited.
“We believe there is nothing more American than our citizens having the right to express themselves freely on matters important to them,” the team said in a statement.
The Warriors said they were “disappointed” they would not have the opportunity to “share our views” on “issues impacting our communities.” Instead, the team plans to “celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion” when it visits Washington in February.
Curry, who has been critical of Trump, said that by snubbing the White House invitation he hoped to send a message“that we don’t stand for basically what our president has — the things that he’s said and the things that he hasn’t said in the right times, that we won’t stand for it.”
Trump’s double-barreled criticism led to a swift backlash from superstars such as James who are as adept at Twitter as the president.
Former Clippers star Chris Paul, now with the Houston Rockets, also took to Twitter to wonder why Trump even cared about the issues, and then challenged the president’s manhood.
Former Lakers superstar Kobe Bryant tweeted Saturday that a president “whose name alone creates division and anger” and “whose words inspire dissension and hatred can’t possibly ‘Make America Great Again.’ ”
Trump’s comments about player protests of the national anthem drew the widest criticism.
Goodell didn’t mention Trump by name, but clearly referenced the president in a written statementSaturday that emphasized the need for “a sense of unity in our country and our culture.”
“Divisive comments like these demonstrate an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL, our great game and all of our players, and a failure to understand the overwhelming force for good our clubs and players represent in our communities,” Goodell said.
DeMaurice Smith, executive director of that NFL Players Assn. union, also publicly denounced Trump, saying in a written statementthat “the line that marks the balance between the rights of every citizen in our great country gets crossed when someone is told to just ‘shut up and play.’ ”
Trump, who once owned the New Jersey Generals of the now-defunct U.S. Football League, appeared unfazed by the criticism.
Later Saturday, he doubled down on his comments by tweeting, “If a player wants the privilege of making millions of dollars in the NFL, or other leagues, he or she should not be allowed to disrespect our Great American Flag (or Country) and should stand for the National Anthem. If not, YOU'RE FIRED. Find something else to do!”
Richard Sherman, the outspoken defensive back for the Seattle Seahawks, had tweeted Saturday that Trump’s behavior was “unacceptable” and that remaining silent was the same as agreeing with it.
Max Garcia, an offensive lineman with the Denver Broncos, wondered on Twitter “where was this passion in response to Charlottesville.” Trump was criticized for initially failing to call out white supremacists and other hate groups whose protests triggered violence in the Virginia college town over the summer.
And Baltimore Ravens tight end Benjamin Watson tweeted that it was “a sad day” when the president “seeks to disregard and punish American citizens for peacefully exercising their constitutional rights.”
UPDATES:
1:50 p.m.: This article was updated to note the Warriors’ decision not to visit the White House.
This article was originally published at noon.
Last edited by jserraglio on Sun Sep 24, 2017 4:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

david johnson
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Re: After calling out NBA and NFL Trump gets slapped around on Twitter

Post by david johnson » Sun Sep 24, 2017 2:46 am

I don't mind if someone fusses at the pro teams.

jserraglio
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Re: After calling out NBA and NFL Trump gets slapped around on Twitter

Post by jserraglio » Sun Sep 24, 2017 4:52 am

david johnson wrote:
Sun Sep 24, 2017 2:46 am
I don't mind if someone fusses at the pro teams.
Even if that someone might be settling old scores?

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jserraglio
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Re: After calling out NBA and NFL Trump gets slapped around on Twitter

Post by jserraglio » Sun Sep 24, 2017 9:20 am

Once again, Trump has screwed up BIGLY. This time on TV with millions watching players defy him.

Starting off in London this morning, prior to the Ravens/Jaguars NFL game.

Members of the Ravens and Jaguars kneeled during the national anthem in response to Trump tweets including Terrell Suggs and Ray Lewis.

https://twitter.com/JMKTV/status/911947332765102081
Last edited by jserraglio on Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jserraglio
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Re: After calling out NBA and NFL Trump gets slapped around on Twitter

Post by jserraglio » Sun Sep 24, 2017 11:12 am

And now MLB flips off the POTUS. Pretty soon nobody will stand, including the fans sitting in the stands.

ESPN

Oakland Athletics rookie catcher Bruce Maxwell became the first Major League Baseball player to kneel during the national anthem when he did so before Saturday night's 1-0 home victory against the Texas Rangers.

Maxwell, 26, dropped to a knee and pressed his cap against his chest just outside Oakland's dugout during the anthem, adopting a protest started by former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick in response to police treatment of blacks.

Maxwell pressed his right hand against his heart while facing the flag, and teammates stood in a line next to him. Teammate Mark Canha, who is white, placed his hand on Maxwell's shoulder, and the two hugged after the anthem finished.

"My decision has been coming for a long time," Maxwell, the son of a U.S. Army veteran, said after the game. "I know I was on the fence for a long time because I know no one in baseball has ever done it. I finally got to the point where I thought the inequality of man is being discussed, and it's being practiced from our president.

"The point of my kneeling is not to disrespect our military, it's not to disrespect our Constitution, it's not to disrespect this country. ... My hand over my heart symbolizes the fact that I am and I'll forever be an American citizen, and I'm more than grateful to be here. But my kneeling is what is getting the attention because I'm kneeling for the people that don't have a voice.

"And this goes beyond the black community, and this goes beyond the Hispanic community, because right now we're having an indifference and a racial divide in all types of people. It's being practiced from the highest power that we have in this country, and it's basically saying that it's OK to treat people differently. My kneeling, the way I did it, was to symbolize that I'm kneeling for a cause, but I'm in no way or form disrespecting my country or my flag."

Athletics manager Bob Melvin said Maxwell addressed the team and told it of his decision. Players were supportive, Maxwell said.

Canha approached Maxwell after the meeting to offer his support.

"I could tell he was getting kind of choked up and emotional about his beliefs and how he feels about the racial discrimination that's going on in this country right now," Canha said. "I felt like every fiber in my being was telling me that he needed a brother today."

Maxwell said he plans to continue kneeling during the anthem.

The A's issued a statement minutes after the national anthem ended, saying: "The Oakland A's pride ourselves on being inclusive. We respect and support all of our players' constitutional rights and freedom of expression."

Major League Baseball also issued a statement later Saturday, saying the league "has a longstanding tradition of honoring our nation prior to the start of our games. We also respect that each of our players is an individual with his own background, perspectives and opinions. We believe that our game will continue to bring our fans, their communities and our players together."

Entering Saturday, Maxwell had played in 71 games this season, batting .244 with three homers and 21 RBIs.

In 2015, Maxwell told the Midland Reporter-Telegram that he was excited to play a game on the Fourth of July, as he was born on a U.S. military installation in Wiesbaden, Germany, while his father, Bruce Jr., did a tour of duty overseas with the U.S. Army.

"It means a little bit more to me," Maxwell said at the time. "I take it a little more personal. It's closer to my heart than most holidays, and so it's just about a respect of guys that give their lives every day and their families that feel the repercussions of what they do over there, even in the States. It's a big thing for me, and it's an honor to play on this day."

Before Saturday's game, Maxwell referenced President Donald Trump's speech on Friday night, in which Trump was critical of NFL players who protest during the national anthem.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Last edited by jserraglio on Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jbuck919
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Re: After calling out NBA and NFL Trump gets slapped around on Twitter

Post by jbuck919 » Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:18 pm

This is one of the hardest Trump moves to understand. To its restrained discredit, NPR, which can afford not to dwell on such a ridiculous thing, pointed out this morning that Trump's base was supporting him. Well Trump's base is the worst people in the country, perhaps 30%, and 30% of people (Americans, anyway) will believe that the moon is made of green cheese. They would support him if he abolished the rest of government and went into rule by decree. He has to rely on them, but he has certainly alienated every sports fan in the country who does not overlap with that crowd by this latest folly.

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jserraglio
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Re: After calling out NBA and NFL Trump gets slapped around on Twitter

Post by jserraglio » Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:29 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:18 pm
This is one of the hardest Trump moves to understand ... he has certainly alienated every sports fan in the country who does not overlap with that crowd by this latest folly.
Yes, taxi-squad Trump has messed up big-league this time. He has united the country against him and tarnished the practice of standing for the national anthem. Has he now become the second sitting POTUS in our history to enter his dotage?

jserraglio
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Re: After calling out NFL, Trump faces open contempt and defiance

Post by jserraglio » Sun Sep 24, 2017 4:16 pm

ESPN

It started early Sunday in London and continued throughout the NFL as players, coaches and even owners locked arms or knelt during the national anthem.

NFL PLAYERS ACROSS the league knelt, locked arms, raised their fists and even refused to come out of the locker room during the national anthem Sunday. They were joined by coaches and even owners.

It comes in the wake of President Donald Trump's recent comments and tweets on protests during the anthem.

It started early Sunday morning in London, as more than a dozen Baltimore Ravens and Jacksonville Jaguars players knelt during the U.S. national anthem at Wembley Stadium. The kneeling players then stood for the singing of the U.K. national anthem.

Ravens coach John Harbaugh, Jaguars coach Doug Marrone and Jaguars owner Shad Khan stood with the players during the anthem.

Trump on Friday night criticized NFL players who lodge protests during the national anthem.

Speaking at a political rally in Huntsville, Alabama, Trump said: "Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, 'Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out. He's fired! He's fired!"

On Sunday, Trump tweeted he was pleased to see so many NFL players locking arms while also decrying those who knelt.

Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs, however, said it was Trump's comments that incited some players to kneel, including himself.

"Personally, I think the comments made about my brothers decided to protest and kneel is kind of what made us no longer be silent," Suggs said. "We stand with our brothers. They have the right to protest. We knelt with them today. Non-violent protest is as American as it gets. We knelt with them today and let them know we are a unified front. There is no dividing us. I guess we're all sons of b----es."

Added teammate Mike Wallace: "Sometimes when you feel things go to far, you have to make a statement. I felt strongly about it. ... After yesterday, it went too far. I just felt strongly about it today. So I did what I did. I didn't need anybody to tell me yes, no, whatever. That was just the way I felt."

There was scattered booing by fans in all stadiums as protests were made Sunday.

In Chicago, as the anthem began in Soldier Field, several Pittsburgh Steelers coaches were on the sideline, including coach Mike Tomlin, while the players were not present as they stayed in the locker room.

The Steelers players took the field within a few seconds of the anthem's conclusion, just after the fireworks launch, with quarterback Ben Roethlisberger one of the first out of the tunnel. Left tackle Alejandro Villanueva, an Army Ranger who served in Afghanistan, was seen on the CBS broadcast at the edge of the tunnel during the anthem, hand over heart.
The Seattle Seahawks and Tennessee Titans also stayed in the locker room during the national anthem before their game in Nashville later Sunday afternoon.
NFL owners were among those across the league who responded this weekend to President Trump's comments and tweets.
New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft on Sunday became the first NFL owner who made a donation to Trump's campaign to speak out.
"I am deeply disappointed by the tone of the comments made by the President on Friday," Kraft said. "I am proud to be associated with so many players who make such tremendous contributions in positively impacting our communities. Their efforts, both on and off the field, help bring people together and make our community stronger."
During the playing of the anthem prior to the Patriots' game against the Houston Texans, Tom Brady stood and locked arms while 20 or so of his teammates knelt. All of the Texans stood and locked arms.
Philadelphia Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie, executives and players locked arms with servicemen and women and police officers during the playing of the anthem, and safety Malcolm Jenkins -- who has been demonstrating for social justice since Week 2 of last season -- continued to raise his first above his head.
Defensive end Chris Long has placed an arm around Jenkins as a sign of support since the events in his hometown of Charlottesville, Virginia, in August. He was joined by several teammates surrounding Jenkins this week. Wide receivers Torrey Smith and Marcus Johnson also raised their fists.
Green Bay Packers tight end Martellus Bennett, who had stood with his fist raised for the past two games, instead sat on the bench during the anthem. He was joined by teammates Lance Kendricks and Kevin King as other Packers players linked arms in two ground on their sideline.
Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, Falcons owner Arthur Blank and Vikings owners Zygi and Mark Wilf were on the field with their teams, locking arms with players while the anthem was played.
Blank said he stood on the sideline not only to show support for the players and coaches, but also to back his public statement denouncing President Trump's criticism of players protesting during the anthem.
Across the field, Tampa Bay Buccaneers players DeSean Jackson and Mike Evans knelt during the anthem.
In Detroit, anthem singer Rico LaVelle took a knee and raised his fist at the conclusion of the song.
Detroit Lions owner Martha Ford and her three daughters, who are usually long gone from the field by the time player introductions begin, remained on the sideline as Detroit's team was introduced and stood next to Jim Caldwell with linked arms. Fans booed the Lions as they protested, which included eight players linking arms while kneeling.
The crowd in Indianapolis also booed loudly as the Colts locked arms and some knelt. About 20 Cleveland Browns players -- all African-American -- knelt during the anthem. Browns running back Duke Johnson, in a group standing behind those who knelt -- apparently in support -- waved the crowd on.
The entire Buffalo Bills sideline took the unusual step of walking about 10 yards toward the middle of the field for the national anthem. Several players then knelt for the national anthem. More than 30 players from the Denver Broncos knelt during the anthem, including members of the practice squad.
Every New York Jets player, coach and staff member linked arms during the anthem. Acting owner Christopher Johnson, the younger brother of owner Woody Johnson, was among them.
For the first time, there were players on the New York Giants -- Damon Harrison, Olivier Vernon and Landon Collins -- who knelt during the anthem. Other players stood with arms locked.
New Orleans Saints running backs Adrian Peterson, Mark Ingram and Alvin Kamara were among a group of 10 players who sat on the bench during the national anthem for the first time Sunday at Carolina.
No Saints had sat or knelt during the anthem before -- though they did organize a teamwide display of unity and hand-holding with the rival Falcons after the anthem on a Monday Night Football game last year.
More than 10 Kansas City Chiefs players sat during the anthem. On the opposing sideline, most Los Angeles Chargers players locked arms, a few sat down and one -- Melvin Ingram -- took a knee.
The Carolina Panthers stood for the anthem, as they have since the season began. Julius Peppers was not on the field at the time, though it was unclear as to why.
The Cincinnati Bengals also continued to stand for the anthem -- most with their arms linked. A few stood with their hands on their hearts. Nobody on the Bengals has kneeled during the national anthem since the protests began last year.
"Football and politics don't mix easily," said a statement issued by the Bengals prior to the game. "Fans come to NFL games to watch great competition on the playing field and that's where our focus should be."
In addition, the NFL will re-air a 60-second spot -- called "Inside These Lines" -- during Sunday Night Football that also appeared during Super Bowl LI. The NFL describes it as a video that "demonstrates the power of football to bring people together."
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lennygoran
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Re: After calling out NBA and NFL Trump gets slapped around on Twitter

Post by lennygoran » Sun Sep 24, 2017 7:57 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:18 pm
Well Trump's base is the worst people in the country,
That's the deplorables, isn't it! Regards, Len :(

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Re: After calling out NBA and NFL Trump gets slapped around on Twitter

Post by lennygoran » Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:00 pm

jserraglio wrote:
Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:29 pm
Has he now become the second sitting POTUS in our history to enter his dotage?
Yes he's the only dotard I ever heard of. Regards, Len :lol:

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Re: After calling out NFL, Trump faces open contempt and defiance

Post by Wallingford » Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:26 am

Where do I stand on Trump's supporters? Well, whenever I go on the treadmill at the senior center, a lot of simple folk who claim Trump's completely tactless statements exactly mirrored what they wanted to say, simply has me seething inside. Well-meaning seniors who're part of the so-called "heartland," proclaiming themselves "the Silent Majority." So many don't realize that was Nixon's phrase.

I've finally latched on to Hillary's own word, "deplorables"; quite a sweeping generalization, but it suffices. (When picking my brain trying to remember her word, I kept thinking it was "undesirables"; but that's really always been part of the reactionary's vocabulary.)
If I could tell my mom and dad
That the things we never had
Never mattered we were always ok
Getting ready for Christmas day
--Paul Simon

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Re: After calling out NFL, Trump faces open contempt and defiance

Post by jbuck919 » Tue Sep 26, 2017 8:24 pm

Wallingford wrote:
Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:26 am
Where do I stand on Trump's supporters? Well, whenever I go on the treadmill at the senior center, a lot of simple folk who claim Trump's completely tactless statements exactly mirrored what they wanted to say, simply has me seething inside. Well-meaning seniors who're part of the so-called "heartland," proclaiming themselves "the Silent Majority." So many don't realize that was Nixon's phrase.

I've finally latched on to Hillary's own word, "deplorables"; quite a sweeping generalization, but it suffices. (When picking my brain trying to remember her word, I kept thinking it was "undesirables"; but that's really always been part of the reactionary's vocabulary.)
Well said, Neil, except perhaps less well-meaning than insufficiently educated. I almost dread my upcoming visit with my father in Florida because he always starts some sort of political conversation and I expect the same thing from him.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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