What are you listening to? Jazz, World, New Age, Rock, etc.

Discuss whatever you want here ... movies, books, recipes, politics, beer, wine, TV ... everything except classical music.

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Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Apr 09, 2006 6:54 pm

I purchased some recordings by pianist Gene Harris and his quartet recently and can’t listen to them often enough. Music like this is why jazz is important to me as well as classical music. A joy in life is felt in his playing and from what I’ve read this reflected the man’s personality.

Harris’s musical roots included the boogie woogie piano his parents collected on records and the gospel music he played in church as a boy, but the blues were the overpowering foundation of his style, to which he added a level of pianism that anyone who loves the instrument might admire. He had a very distinctive style but comparisons with Errol Garner, Oscar Peterson, Art Tatum, and Earl Hines have been made. Harris was eclectic in his choice of material – the blues, the Great America Songbook, modern jazz standards or a contemporary pop tune might catch his fancy to be interpreted in his own highly imaginative way. He was a hard swinging pianist who could also melt your heart with a ballad.

In his notes to one of my discs, Ed Berger of the Rutgers Institute of Jazz Studies writes:

“While creating vastly different moods, Gene’s playing retains its distinctive characteristics: the bell-like clarity of each note (no matter what the tempo), the surging chordal attack, varied dynamics, and relentless drive.”

Sadly, he passed away in 2000, just in his sixties, while awaiting a kidney transplant.

Here are the albums I've been listening to - all recorded brilliantly by Concord.

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"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Ethan
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Post by Ethan » Mon Apr 10, 2006 5:09 pm

There was some talk about who replaced Sinatra in the Dorsey orchestra, and of course that person was Dick Haymes, a very good pop singer who recorded two fine LPs; "Rain or Shine" and "Moondreams."

Well, this is my third post ever. I've been a jazz fan for a long time, mostly of jazz from the 20s through the 50s, with some 60s in there. Things I've been listening to in the last few days are:

Jimmy Rushing - Oh Love (this is superb...50s Vanguard sides)
Stephan Grappelli - Live in London, 1973
Eddie Lang & Lonnie Johnson - from Venuti/Lang JSP box set.
Louis Armstrong - Plays W.C. Handy (best of mature Louis, for sure)
Jack Teagarden - various early recordings on my computer playlist.

I am also in agreement with the folks who dig Lee Wiley...I am a big fan. I also like the Boswell Sisters and Connie (aka Connee) Boswell, who was a contemporary of Wiley's.

I'm really glad some people here have diverse tastes in music.

miranda
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Post by miranda » Mon Apr 10, 2006 5:45 pm

Yeah, Hadynseek, I'm really glad you started this thread. Thank you.

Like all of you, I'm sure, my tastes in jazz are wide-ranging. I love the older traditional stuff like Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington,, Jelly Roll Morton, Fats Waller, Art Tatum, etc.
But I also love more avant-garde jazz, like the later Miles Davis, John Coltrane's more experimental stuff, Cecil Taylor, Albert Ayler, and of course the late, great Sun Ra.

I haven't been listening to much jazz lately, and I need to. I think I'll put on some Billie Holiday. A friend of mine finds her to be too 'mannered', as she said, but I have never found that to be the case. Billie sings from her heart, and her work, especially with Lester Young, is sublime, in my opinion.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Mon Apr 10, 2006 6:15 pm

miranda wrote:A friend of mine finds her to be too 'mannered', as she said, but I have never found that to be the case. Billie sings from her heart, and her work, especially with Lester Young, is sublime, in my opinion.
I agree with your friend, at least about late Holiday. I like early Holiday. One thing about late Holiday, tho', I can't imagine any other human voice making Strange Fruit the macbre, eerie, haunting, riveting document of the pre-Voting Rights Act South that it is.
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Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Mon Apr 10, 2006 8:11 pm

Ethan wrote:There was some talk about who replaced Sinatra in the Dorsey orchestra, and of course that person was Dick Haymes, a very good pop singer who recorded two fine LPs; "Rain or Shine" and "Moondreams."

Well, this is my third post ever. I've been a jazz fan for a long time, mostly of jazz from the 20s through the 50s, with some 60s in there. Things I've been listening to in the last few days are:

Jimmy Rushing - Oh Love (this is superb...50s Vanguard sides)
Stephan Grappelli - Live in London, 1973
Eddie Lang & Lonnie Johnson - from Venuti/Lang JSP box set.
Louis Armstrong - Plays W.C. Handy (best of mature Louis, for sure)
Jack Teagarden - various early recordings on my computer playlist.

I am also in agreement with the folks who dig Lee Wiley...I am a big fan. I also like the Boswell Sisters and Connie (aka Connee) Boswell, who was a contemporary of Wiley's.

I'm really glad some people here have diverse tastes in music.
That's great stuff you've listed. I have that Venuti/Lang box too - excellent remastering. Most of us associate the combination of violin and guitar with the work of Django Reinhardt and Grappelli but it was this earlier duo that conceived what became a classic grouping in jazz.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

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Post by rogch » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:02 am

Today i bought the Theolonious Monk quartet and John Coltrane live at Carnegie Hall. I guess it doesn't get much better than this, at least not as far as "chamber music" is concerned. (We always have the more complex big band music of Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus).
Roger Christensen

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Ethan
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Post by Ethan » Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:18 am

Corlyss_D, forgive me if you know this, but I thought I'd point out that Holiday recorded "Strange Fruit" several times, the first being pretty early on, in the 1930s.

Haydnseek,
I noticed that in another thread you mentioned Bing Crosby and John Kirby, folks I enjoy as well. You have good taste. Also, I enjoy Venuti and Lang far more than I do Reinhardt and Grappelli...that Venuti/Lang collection on JSP does sound great as well. Too bad John R.T. Davies passed away, as he did some amazing remastering for JSP and some other companies. In fact, have you ever heard The Spirits Of Rhythm? Davies remastered a nice disc of their stuff, which is wild, swingin' 30s Harlem harmony music done with guitars (or "tipples") and incorporating such innovations as percussion played on a suitcase wrapped in paper.

miranda
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Post by miranda » Wed Apr 12, 2006 7:26 am

Corlyss_D wrote:
I agree with your friend, at least about late Holiday. I like early Holiday. One thing about late Holiday, tho', I can't imagine any other human voice making Strange Fruit the macbre, eerie, haunting, riveting document of the pre-Voting Rights Act South that it is.
Corlyss, re: Strange Fruit--amen, and well said. That song as sung by Billie, will always have a profound emotional impact on me, no matter how many times I hear it.

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Wed Apr 12, 2006 7:53 pm

Ethan wrote:Haydnseek,
I noticed that in another thread you mentioned Bing Crosby and John Kirby, folks I enjoy as well. You have good taste. Also, I enjoy Venuti and Lang far more than I do Reinhardt and Grappelli...that Venuti/Lang collection on JSP does sound great as well. Too bad John R.T. Davies passed away, as he did some amazing remastering for JSP and some other companies. In fact, have you ever heard The Spirits Of Rhythm? Davies remastered a nice disc of their stuff, which is wild, swingin' 30s Harlem harmony music done with guitars (or "tipples") and incorporating such innovations as percussion played on a suitcase wrapped in paper.
I haven't heard of The Spirits of Rhythm but from what I've been able to learn from Google they sound like a fun group. Can you identify that recording more specificallly?

It seems to me that Grappelli was a late bloomer whose best work, so very elegant and stylish, was done late in life, after his time with Reinhardt. I love Django and the whole "Gypsy Jazz" tradition though. Right now, I'm listening to one of the best contemporary Gypsy guitarists, Stochelo Rosenberg, on a live album from a performance at an annual Django Reinhardt festival held near Paris. I heard this trio in person several years ago.

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By the way, ever see Woody Allen's film "Sweet and Low Down"? It's about a brilliant jazz guitarist from the 1930's who's sure of his own superiority "except for this guy in France"? I loved it.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Ethan
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Post by Ethan » Wed Apr 12, 2006 10:52 pm

No problem, Haydnseek, here is the exact compact disc, followed by the exact same disc again, for quite a bit more. You know how amazon.com is with the doubles sometimes. I include the second link because it contains more reviews. In any case, this is the disc to get, as it covers the complete original output, and has great sound by Davies.

link


link

Also, have you read "Jazz Singing" by Will Friedwald? He is a very funny and opinionated writer, and this book is a classic (and is also where I learned of the Spirits). Another great one is "Lost Chords" by Richard M. Sudhalter, which has to be one of the most fascinating, well researched, and well written books I've ever read, on any subject. "Lost Chords" deals with the forgotten contributions of white musicians to early jazz, and as such features Crosby, the Boswells, Wiley, Norvo, Rollini, Bud Freeman, Lang & Venuti, Teagarden, and all of those great, great musicians.

link

And about Django, yes, I do like him, and I'd say that the "Classic Early Recordings" on JSP (Davies, again), which you no doubt already own, is essential listening.

Now I hope that if you ever see me floundering in the classical section of this board you will be kind enough to throw me a life preserver.

(edited for spelling)
Last edited by Ethan on Thu Apr 13, 2006 3:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

Ethan
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Post by Ethan » Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:12 pm

Oh, and I forgot to respond about "Sweet & Low Down." Yes, I've seen it...a couple of times. Great film, and any flaws it possesses are, for me, negated by the subject matter. I had a friend, very smart (though not a jazz fan exactly), who saw the film and told me later, "I've never even heard of that guy before."

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Post by miranda » Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:54 pm

sweet and lowdown is wonderful. i'm not a big fan of woody allen, but that was a terrific movie. it's been years since i saw it, i should rent it and see it again.

today i listened to this wondrous album:

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Gary
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Post by Gary » Mon Apr 17, 2006 1:15 am

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BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Wed Apr 19, 2006 3:28 pm

Its been awhile since I listened to MJQ, I will have to remedy that.

Been listening to alot of Fela and the Africa 70:

With one Amazon reviewer likening the music to "James Brown in space on amphetamines" how can anyone resist?

Fela was quite a talented keyboard and sax player, in addition to a singer and political figure.

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Post by Gary » Tue Apr 25, 2006 3:49 am

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"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Apr 25, 2006 11:45 am

I watched Bobby Darin' bio on Biography last night. Very interesting guy to have decided in the midst of the Elvis craze in 1956 or 7 that he wanted to do "standards." I'm surprised that no one made the connection between his courageous determination to "become a star before he was 25" in definance of the doctors predictions of premature death (by age 13) and his choice of Darin as his stage name. According to his sister, he saw the word Mandarin immediately after someone told him to change his name, and liked the sound of Darin.
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Ted

Post by Ted » Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:05 pm

“Dream Lover” and “Splish Splash” are two of the earliest Rock and Roll records I remember. (He played the guitar and wrote his own tunes as well)
It was amazing how he made the transition from Rock and Roll to Sinatra Style so effortlessly.
There are recordings of Darin singing standards at the Copacabana that will give you chills.
He also made a movie in 1962(Pressure Point) with Sidney Poitier that clearly demonstrated his acting prowess
But as a singer…an interpreter of the American Songbook….too bad we lost him so early
BTW
Kevin Spacey should have his vocal chords ripped out—

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Tue Apr 25, 2006 1:10 pm

I remember watching Bobby Darin's summer variety show on TV in 1973 which was the year he died. With the sometimes goofy rock and roll and folky years behind him he was looking sauve and confident in a tux and singing better than ever before. I remember thinking "I didn't know he was that good!" His best years were ahead of him, I'm sure, as the style of music that suited his talents was coming back into favor.

By the way, I think its time we had another musical variety show on TV of the sort you saw in the 50's and 60's. There are quite a few young singers exploring the standards today or performing new music influenced by the older styles, and I've read that their popularity crosses different age groups.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Wed Apr 26, 2006 10:48 pm

Been listening to
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and

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and because I can't live without funk:

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Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Thu Apr 27, 2006 10:11 am

I've been listening to recordings of contemporary saxophone master Joe Lovano who has a very expressive and individual sound. Not all of his work is as accessible as what you hear on these CDs. I hope I get to hear him in person some day.

52nd Street Themes features a nonet (3 tenor saxophones, 1 alto, 1 baritone, trumpet, trombone, bass and drums) on most tracks with nifty arrangements by Willie Smith of music from the bebop era. There are 5 pieces by Tadd Dameron. I play this often.

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The other recordings feature the quartet of Lovano, pianist Hank Jones, bassist George Mraz and drummer Paul Motian. I'm All For You is all classic ballads. Great late night listening! Joyous Encounter mixes the tempos.

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"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sun Apr 30, 2006 1:13 pm

All weekend I've been listening to a new 4 CD box set from the UK label Proper of Thelonious Monk's important early recordings. They first appeared on the Blue Note, Prestige and Riverside labels during the years 1947-1955. This is a wonderful bargain at around US$ 20 for anyone curious to know the work of one of jazz music's most original composers and pianists. Monk received a posthumous Pulitzer prize this year for "a body of distinguished and innovative musical composition that has had a significant and enduring impact on the evolution of jazz."

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"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Gary
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Post by Gary » Tue May 02, 2006 2:49 am

The nine minutes or so of drum-solo from Joe Morello in Castilian Drums on track 4, dics 2, is incredible!


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"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

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miranda
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Post by miranda » Sat May 06, 2006 12:21 pm

Gary, that Martin Denny album is great. I'm gonna have to pull that one out and listen to it again one of these days.

Right now, I'm listening to that master of the vibraphone, Lionel Hampton:

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Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sat May 06, 2006 5:16 pm

I love the sound of the vibraphone.

Right now I'm listening to Horace-Scope by The Horace Silver Quintet which includes two of Silver's best-known tunes: Strollin' and Nica's Dream.

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"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

Gary
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Post by Gary » Sun May 07, 2006 2:59 am

miranda wrote:Gary, that Martin Denny album is great.
Sure is! :)

Miranda, I just found out on Wikipedia that he died on March 2 of last year. :(

Haydnseek wrote:I love the sound of the vibraphone.
So do I. My favorite vibraphonist is Milt Jackson of The Modern Jazz Quartet.
"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

miranda
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Post by miranda » Tue May 09, 2006 10:44 am

Now I can't find that Martin Denny album. Damn, damn.

May he rest in peace. He had a good long innings though--according to wikipedia, he was born in 1911.

Right now I'm listening to Chet is Back!, a marvelous album where he sings 4 songs in Italian, backed by Ennio Morricone's orchestra.

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Gary
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Post by Gary » Thu May 11, 2006 5:24 pm

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"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

miranda
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Post by miranda » Sun May 14, 2006 4:53 pm

Now I'm listening to a strange and wondrous masterpiece by that eccentric genius, Sun Ra, and his orchestra.

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Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Sun May 14, 2006 5:53 pm

Guido Basso and Dave Turner: Midnight Martini

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Last edited by Haydnseek on Mon May 15, 2006 11:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

miranda
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Post by miranda » Mon May 15, 2006 11:34 am

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Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Mon May 15, 2006 11:44 am

Miranda et al, you guys make me want to find my Marcus Roberts disc and I haven't a clue where it is!

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Corlyss
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Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Mon May 15, 2006 12:36 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:Miranda et al, you guys make me want to find my Marcus Roberts disc and I haven't a clue where it is!

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As it happens I was sampling this CD online just a couple of weeks ago. I may get it one day or something else by Roberts.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Thu May 18, 2006 12:01 am

The complete Painkiller recordings:

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This was a John Zorn project with Bill Laswell and Napalm Death drummer Mick Harris. Guest appearances by Yamatsuka Eye and Justin Broadrick of Godflesh. Its a mix of short pieces, much like the Eye titles on Naked City with neat song titles like Purgatory Of Fiery Vulvas and longer jams and ambient works.

and

Congotronics: Konono no.1

see a music video of the band at:
http://www.crammed.be/craworld/movies/konono_promo.htm

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The band plays curious instruments that resemble children's toys; its cymbals look like smashed hub caps; its sound is harsh and otherworldly. But what really makes "Congotronics" (Crammed Discs), the debut album by the African band Konono No. 1, one of the most startling of recent world-music releases - and drawn comparisons to the German electronic-music pioneers Kraftwerk and the reggae producer Lee Perry - is the amplification system the band has used for the last 30 years.

Konono No. 1, a 12-piece group led by the septuagenarian Mawangu Mingiedi, performs in outdoor cafes in Kinshasa, Congo. To make its traditional trance music heard above the roar of the traffic-choked streets, it amplifies its toylike likembés, or thumb pianos, using pick-up microphones made from the magnets in car alternators and loudspeakers left behind by Belgian colonists in 1960. The squalling feedback this lo-fi system produces is worked into the polyrhythmic drumming and call-and-response chanting to create a brutal, neotraditional genre Kinshasa's musicians call tradi-moderne.

"When I encountered it, I thought it was the equivalent of punk music in Africa," said Vincent Kenis, a Brussels-based producer who first heard Konono No. 1 on a French radio station in 1980. "From then it took me 10 years to go to Kinshasa and look for them and another 10 years to find them." He finally tracked down the band in 2000 and discovered it sounded just as it had 20 years before: no equipment had been replaced.

"Congotronics" was recorded outdoors using an Apple laptop and a handful of microphones, and was mixed in Mr. Kenis's hotel room with members of the band. It has sold 15,000 copies worldwide, a respectable number for such an esoteric record, and will be released in the United States on June 28; the band has embarked on its first tour of Europe, with the United States to follow in November. Electronic-music devotees have raved about "Congotronics" on the Internet, while some world-music fans remain suspicious. "They say this is rock and not traditional African music," Mr. Kenis said. "They don't believe it. But the public that doesn't care about African music immediately catches on to this music. African music is not only pretty voices recorded in Europe and America. It can also be very violent and very special and very inventive." - Andy Pemberton

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Post by mourningstar » Thu May 18, 2006 7:26 am

Nice :o . I'm a jazz lover too, .. besides classical music, ..

anyways these are the Jazz songs i've been listening to :

George Benson - The Masquerade (long version)
Chet baker - But not for me
Diana Krall - Dream a little dream of me
Chris botti - Goodmorning Heartache
"Desertion for the artist means abandoning the concrete."

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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu May 18, 2006 1:45 pm

mourningstar wrote:Nice :o . I'm a jazz lover too, .. besides classical music, ..

anyways these are the Jazz songs i've been listening to :

George Benson - The Masquerade (long version)
Chet baker - But not for me
Diana Krall - Dream a little dream of me
Chris botti - Goodmorning Heartache
Some of my favorites too. Are you a fan of the Great American Songbook?
Corlyss
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mourningstar
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Post by mourningstar » Thu May 18, 2006 5:23 pm

Yes, I am fond of the American Songbook. :P

but I like the instrumental jazz too. (Miles davis,George Benson)

How about you. Name one of your favourites? i'm curious to know :)
"Desertion for the artist means abandoning the concrete."

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Post by Corlyss_D » Thu May 18, 2006 9:22 pm

mourningstar wrote:Yes, I am fond of the American Songbook. :P

but I like the instrumental jazz too. (Miles davis,George Benson)

How about you. Name one of your favourites? i'm curious to know :)
Instrumentalists or musicians who do the Songbook?
Corlyss
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mourningstar
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Post by mourningstar » Fri May 19, 2006 5:00 am

instrumentalist,Vocalist and the Great American Songbook :P
"Desertion for the artist means abandoning the concrete."

Gary
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Post by Gary » Tue May 23, 2006 2:17 am

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"Your idea of a donut-shaped universe intrigues me, Homer; I may have to steal it."

--Stephen Hawking makes guest appearance on The Simpsons

miranda
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Post by miranda » Tue May 23, 2006 12:28 pm

BMV, that John Zorn/Bill Laswell album sounds interesting. I'll have to check out some sound samples of that.

Right now, I'm listening to:

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Haydnseek
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Post by Haydnseek » Thu May 25, 2006 7:06 pm

A good one from 1958: Cool Struttin' by Sonny Clark

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"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Fri May 26, 2006 8:43 am

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More killer funk from the John Scofield Band

also


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and

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Post by DavidRoss » Fri May 26, 2006 9:04 am

Bill Evans on Freddie the Freeloader, Miles Davis, Kind of Blue. Does it get any better than this?
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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Post by BWV 1080 » Fri May 26, 2006 9:08 am

DavidRoss wrote:Bill Evans on Freddie the Freeloader, Miles Davis, Kind of Blue. Does it get any better than this?
No, unfortunately its all downhill from now on, an inexorable decline until final oblivion

But then again, there is always John McLaughlin on In a Silent Way

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Post by Corlyss_D » Fri May 26, 2006 1:45 pm

Steve, are you being puckish with those funky things?
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BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Fri May 26, 2006 2:07 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:Steve, are you being puckish with those funky things?
Not at all. Those discs are currently in my car CD changer alongside King Sunny Ade's Juju Music, Boulez's recent Le Marteau disc and the Congotronics disc I posted earlier.

DavidRoss
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Post by DavidRoss » Fri May 26, 2006 7:16 pm

BWV 1080 wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:Steve, are you being puckish with those funky things?
Not at all. Those discs are currently in my car CD changer alongside King Sunny Ade's Juju Music, Boulez's recent Le Marteau disc and the Congotronics disc I posted earlier.
McLaughlin's a fave since his stint with Miles, I love King Sunny Ade (and right after Juju Music was released caught his band on tour in the States at a small venue in Santa Cruz--one of the hottest most dance-crazy nights of my life), and just listened to the new Le Marteau yesterday. As for Ozzie & Metallica, I'll just follow my mammaw's advice and keep my mouth shut. :wink:
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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mourningstar
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Post by mourningstar » Sat May 27, 2006 7:21 am

Charlie Parker - How high the moon
Miles davis - I could write a book
Miles davis - A prelude to a Kiss
Duke Ellington - Jazz cocktail
Chet baker & Paul Desmond - Tangerine
:)
"Desertion for the artist means abandoning the concrete."

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Post by Haydnseek » Sat May 27, 2006 5:07 pm

Oliver Jones: From Lush to Lively

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This CD from the Canadian Justin Time label is actually a big band recording with arrangements showcasing the elegant piano playing of Oliver Jones. The orchestra leader and arranger is saxophonist Rick Wilkins who was a central figure in Rob McConnell's Boss Brass. Actually the band is pretty much the Boss Brass including McConnell himself in the trombone section. Strings were added to some arrangements. Several standards are included: The Way You Look Tonight, The Very Thought of You, Our Love is Hear to Stay, and Swinging On a Star plus four songs by Oscar Peterson and three by Jones. This recording just hits the spot when I feel like listening to some swinging, melodious modern big band jazz that's easy on the ears. Guaranteed to produce a smile.
"The law isn't justice. It's a very imperfect mechanism. If you press exactly the right buttons and are also lucky, justice may show up in the answer. A mechanism is all the law was ever intended to be." - Raymond Chandler

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Post by Corlyss_D » Sat May 27, 2006 7:18 pm

" If 'pro' is the opposite of 'con', what is the opposite of 'progress'? " - by Mark Twain
Love it, Mourningstar! Soooooooooooooooo true. When the Congress was locked down yesterday, and the little buggers couldn't even order in pizza, and committee staffers were holding up signs saying "Send Food!", and they couldn't even go to the bathroom, was one of the few times when they have actually been simultaneously in session and harmless.
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