Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

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moreno
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Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

Post by moreno » Tue Mar 16, 2010 4:11 pm

A thing that I find kind of disturbing is the way to use classical music as a mean of depicting a bourgeois family.
Chabrol's The Ceremony and Haneke's Funny Games come to my mind. And on top of that, both families get murdered!

Corlyss_D
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Re: Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:44 am

moreno wrote:A thing that I find kind of disturbing is the way to use classical music as a mean of depicting a bourgeois family.
Two examples are nothing more than two examples, not a trend.
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DavidRoss
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Re: Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

Post by DavidRoss » Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:21 am

Seems to me that classical music in movies is usually associated with the upper classes, not the bourgeoisie.
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

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moldyoldie
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Re: Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

Post by moldyoldie » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:21 am

Corlyss_D wrote:
moreno wrote:A thing that I find kind of disturbing is the way to use classical music as a mean of depicting a bourgeois family.
Two examples are nothing more than two examples, not a trend.
Emphatically agreed. More obvious to me was how at one time the guy with lighter hair and complexion was seemingly "always" the good guy when the swarthy, dark-haired fellow was "always" the villain. It's a silly generalization whose conscious practice by commercial filmmakers seems to have ebbed over time...thankfully.

Especially in the '70s following Kubrick's lead, classical music was seemingly "always" used in science fiction films - often, but not always effectively. Zardoz, Soylent Green, and Rollerball come immediately to mind, but I know there were others. I'm thinking the filmmakers felt the music lent a "heaviness" to a film genre which theretofore was rarely taken too seriously by mainstream audiences.
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moreno
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Re: Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

Post by moreno » Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:01 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
moreno wrote:A thing that I find kind of disturbing is the way to use classical music as a mean of depicting a bourgeois family.
Two examples are nothing more than two examples, not a trend.
When the tantrum is over, maybe you can read my post again.

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Re: Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:13 pm

moreno wrote:When the tantrum is over, maybe you can read my post again.
Do you want to talk about two movies or a practice. I didn't see either of those movies so I can't comment on them. If you want to talk about a practice, I don't see it based on two movies.
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DavidRoss
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Re: Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

Post by DavidRoss » Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:38 pm

moreno wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:
moreno wrote:A thing that I find kind of disturbing is the way to use classical music as a mean of depicting a bourgeois family.
Two examples are nothing more than two examples, not a trend.
When the tantrum is over, maybe you can read my post again.
Tantrum? WTF?
"Most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept even the simplest and most obvious truth if it would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have delighted in explaining to colleagues, which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabric of their lives." ~Leo Tolstoy

"It is the highest form of self-respect to admit our errors and mistakes and make amends for them. To make a mistake is only an error in judgment, but to adhere to it when it is discovered shows infirmity of character." ~Dale Turner

"Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either." ~Albert Einstein
"Truth is incontrovertible; malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it; but, in the end, there it is." ~Winston Churchill

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John F
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Re: Classical music as a symbol of bourgeoisie in cinema

Post by John F » Thu Mar 18, 2010 7:08 am

moreno wrote:A thing that I find kind of disturbing is the way to use classical music as a mean of depicting a bourgeois family.
Chabrol's The Ceremony and Haneke's Funny Games come to my mind. And on top of that, both families get murdered!
Your point is? Or is it just that two particular 1990s films rub you the wrong way?
John Francis

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