Louis L'amour

A cozy, genteel room to discuss books, authors, and things literary.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
keaggy220
Posts: 4721
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 8:42 pm
Location: Washington DC Area

Louis L'amour

Post by keaggy220 » Sat Jan 02, 2010 7:40 am

I just finished my first Louis L'amour and loved it. The official LL website provides the correct chronological order of the Sackett novels so I started with the first suggested novel, Sackett’s Land. Here's the list:

http://www.louislamour.com/sackett/index.htm

The story takes place in 1599 and tells the story of Barnabas Sackett, patriarch of the Sackett clan, and his adventure of coming to America. It is, of course, a work of fiction, but L'amour intermingles facts throughout the book. After finishing the book I decided to read a little about LL and discovered he was a voracious reader and great student of history who loved to include this knowledge in his works of fiction.

Anyway, highly recommended and I will be reading more from him in the future. There are plenty to choose from as he is one of the most prolific authors ever.

I've now moved on to 1776 by David McCullough. I just started it, but so far seems it will be as enjoyable as John Adams.
"I guess we're all, or most of us, the wards of the nineteenth-century sciences which denied existence of anything it could not reason or explain. The things we couldn't explain went right on but not with our blessing... So many old and lovely things are stored in the world's attic, because we don't want them around us and we don't dare throw them out."
— John Steinbeck, The Winter of Our Discontent


"He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.
And what does the LORD require of you?
To act justly and to love mercy
and to walk humbly with your God."
- Micah 6:8

D
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2007 10:26 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Louis L'amour

Post by D » Tue Jan 12, 2010 3:53 pm

I"ve been reading some Max Brand lately. Ever had the pleasure?

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Re: Louis L'amour

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jan 12, 2010 4:14 pm

keaggy wrote:I just finished my first Louis L'amour and loved it.
You might be interested in his intellectual autobiography, Education of a Wandering Man. A friend briefed our book club on it a couple of years ago. I didn't follow L'amour and didn't care for the movies based on his books, so I was astonished at his incredible personal history and how he developed into a writer. Naturally he was a prolific reader as well, and, in his youth while he was bumming around the world on tramp steamers and working in logging camps, he set out a reading program for himself, which he describes in the book. Basically it was his own Great Books reading program 20 years before the Great Books series was devised. Altogether a fascinating life and mind.
D wrote:I"ve been reading some Max Brand lately. Ever had the pleasure?
I partook in my yout. Read a bunch of them. Loved 'em. Can't say as I recall a single one, but the memory of reading them and fetching home a new one from the drug store book rack is fond.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

D
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2007 10:26 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Louis L'amour

Post by D » Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:08 am

Brand was one pseudonym for Frederick Faust who also gave us Dr. Kildare!

keaggy220
Posts: 4721
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 8:42 pm
Location: Washington DC Area

Re: Louis L'amour

Post by keaggy220 » Thu Jan 14, 2010 8:41 am

Corlyss_D wrote:
keaggy wrote:I just finished my first Louis L'amour and loved it.
You might be interested in his intellectual autobiography, Education of a Wandering Man. A friend briefed our book club on it a couple of years ago. I didn't follow L'amour and didn't care for the movies based on his books, so I was astonished at his incredible personal history and how he developed into a writer. Naturally he was a prolific reader as well, and, in his youth while he was bumming around the world on tramp steamers and working in logging camps, he set out a reading program for himself, which he describes in the book. Basically it was his own Great Books reading program 20 years before the Great Books series was devised. Altogether a fascinating life and mind.
D wrote:I"ve been reading some Max Brand lately. Ever had the pleasure?
I partook in my yout. Read a bunch of them. Loved 'em. Can't say as I recall a single one, but the memory of reading them and fetching home a new one from the drug store book rack is fond.
Thanks for the info, I'll be sure to check ti out.
"I guess we're all, or most of us, the wards of the nineteenth-century sciences which denied existence of anything it could not reason or explain. The things we couldn't explain went right on but not with our blessing... So many old and lovely things are stored in the world's attic, because we don't want them around us and we don't dare throw them out."
— John Steinbeck, The Winter of Our Discontent


"He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.
And what does the LORD require of you?
To act justly and to love mercy
and to walk humbly with your God."
- Micah 6:8

BWV 1080
Posts: 4451
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2005 10:05 pm

Re: Louis L'amour

Post by BWV 1080 » Thu Jan 14, 2010 5:11 pm

save your time and cut to the greatest Western novel written

Image

D
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2007 10:26 pm
Location: Minnesota

Re: Louis L'amour

Post by D » Thu Jan 14, 2010 6:21 pm

What about Lonesome Dove?

BWV 1080
Posts: 4451
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2005 10:05 pm

Re: Louis L'amour

Post by BWV 1080 » Thu Jan 14, 2010 7:55 pm

D wrote:What about Lonesome Dove?
a somewhat distant second

keaggy220
Posts: 4721
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 8:42 pm
Location: Washington DC Area

Re: Louis L'amour

Post by keaggy220 » Thu Jan 14, 2010 8:24 pm

BWV 1080 wrote:save your time and cut to the greatest Western novel written

Image
I'm definitely interested in reading some Cormac McCarthy. Thanks for the suggestion.
"I guess we're all, or most of us, the wards of the nineteenth-century sciences which denied existence of anything it could not reason or explain. The things we couldn't explain went right on but not with our blessing... So many old and lovely things are stored in the world's attic, because we don't want them around us and we don't dare throw them out."
— John Steinbeck, The Winter of Our Discontent


"He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.
And what does the LORD require of you?
To act justly and to love mercy
and to walk humbly with your God."
- Micah 6:8

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests