The worst history book ever?

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John F
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The worst history book ever?

Post by John F » Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:45 am

So why was this book not vetted before Thomas Nelson accepted it for publication? They're a religious publisher and maybe they took it on faith. By the way, the foreword is by Glenn Beck. Remember him?


Publisher Pulls Controversial Thomas Jefferson Book, Citing Loss Of Confidence
August 9, 2012
by Elise Hu

Citing a loss of confidence in the book's details, Christian publisher Thomas Nelson is ending the publication and distribution of the bestseller, "The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson."

The controversial book was written by Texas evangelical David Barton, who NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty profiled on All Things Considered Wednesday. The publishing company says it's ceasing publication because it found that "basic truths just were not there."

Since its initial publication, historians have debunked and raised concerns about numerous claims in Barton's book. In it, Barton calls Jefferson a "conventional Christian," claims the founding father started church services at the Capitol, and even though he owned more than 200 slaves, says Jefferson was a civil rights visionary.

"Mr. Barton is presenting a Jefferson that modern-day evangelicals could love and identify with," Warren Throckmorton, a professor at the evangelical Grove City College, told Hagerty. "The problem with that is, it's not a whole Jefferson; it's not getting him right."

The book's publisher came to the same conclusion. "When the concerns came in, from multiple people, and that had weight too, we were trying to sort things out," said Thomas Nelson Senior Vice President and Publisher Brian Hampton. "Were these matters of opinion? Were they differences of interpretation? But as we got into it, our conclusion was that the criticisms were correct. There were historical details — matters of fact, not matters of opinion, that were not supported at all."

The book has already been pulled off the Thomas Nelson website, and the publisher is in the process of pulling down its availability as an e-book from retail partners. Publishing rights are being reverted to the author, and the physical copies of the book are in the process of being removed from bookstores.

"The truth is, the withdrawing a book from the market is extremely rare. It's so rare I can't think of the last time we've done this," Hampton said. But, he said, "If there are matters of fact not correctly handled or the basic truth is not there, we would make a decision based on that."

We've reached out to Barton for reaction and will update when we hear from him. WORLDmag.com's Thomas Kidd reports: "Barton told me that he regards Thomas Nelson's decision as a 'strange scenario.' He added that the press has not tried to engage him about the ostensible problems in the book, and that Thomas Nelson officials simply notified him by email that they were stopping publication."

This decision doesn't leave Barton without a publisher, however. Barton's own organization, WallBuilders, published his previous books.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/201 ... confidence
John Francis

lennygoran
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Re: The worst history book ever?

Post by lennygoran » Sat Aug 11, 2012 6:56 am

John F wrote: By the way, the foreword is by Glenn Beck. Remember him?
Yeah I remember him--why'd you have to remind me! Regards, Len :(

Mark Harwood
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Re: The worst history book ever?

Post by Mark Harwood » Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:43 am

An aside, if I may.
The worst book on music history, whose title I have forgotten, had chapters about Jazz and the Blues. I found it in a school library. Two things I recall: Dixieland was so-called because of the word "Dix" on a ten dollar note, and Blues songs were generally about slavery.
"I did it for the music."
Ken Colyer

jbuck919
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Re: The worst history book ever?

Post by jbuck919 » Wed Feb 27, 2013 8:37 am

Mark Harwood wrote:An aside, if I may.
The worst book on music history, whose title I have forgotten, had chapters about Jazz and the Blues. I found it in a school library. Two things I recall: Dixieland was so-called because of the word "Dix" on a ten dollar note, and Blues songs were generally about slavery.

While both of those statements are incomplete explanations, neither is exactly wrong (check out the Wikipedia articles). If this was a book written for children or adolescents, one would expect it to oversimplify things, which unfortunately often means picking and choosing which part of the story to tell.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Mark Harwood
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Re: The worst history book ever?

Post by Mark Harwood » Wed Feb 27, 2013 12:46 pm

jbuck919 wrote:
Mark Harwood wrote:An aside, if I may.
The worst book on music history, whose title I have forgotten, had chapters about Jazz and the Blues. I found it in a school library. Two things I recall: Dixieland was so-called because of the word "Dix" on a ten dollar note, and Blues songs were generally about slavery.

While both of those statements are incomplete explanations, neither is exactly wrong (check out the Wikipedia articles). If this was a book written for children or adolescents, one would expect it to oversimplify things, which unfortunately often means picking and choosing which part of the story to tell.
Blues songs about slavery are rare.
The Mason-Dixon line defined the border of Dixieland in common understanding.
Wikipedia is a source of comically daft assertions about music. I was finally moved to register and make a correction when an article stated that two songs had the same chord pattern, which they plainly do not, at any point.
"I did it for the music."
Ken Colyer

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
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Re: The worst history book ever?

Post by jbuck919 » Wed Feb 27, 2013 3:01 pm

Mark Harwood wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:
Mark Harwood wrote:An aside, if I may.
The worst book on music history, whose title I have forgotten, had chapters about Jazz and the Blues. I found it in a school library. Two things I recall: Dixieland was so-called because of the word "Dix" on a ten dollar note, and Blues songs were generally about slavery.

While both of those statements are incomplete explanations, neither is exactly wrong (check out the Wikipedia articles). If this was a book written for children or adolescents, one would expect it to oversimplify things, which unfortunately often means picking and choosing which part of the story to tell.
Blues songs about slavery are rare.
The Mason-Dixon line defined the border of Dixieland in common understanding.
Wikipedia is a source of comically daft assertions about music. I was finally moved to register and make a correction when an article stated that two songs had the same chord pattern, which they plainly do not, at any point.
Oh, I've made dozens of corrections to Wikipedia, mostly not musical, but I fixed their entry on the Schubert Ave Maria, in which they managed to mess up both the Latin and English versions of the prayer (which every Catholic schoolboy from my generation knows by heart), as well as the one on Erlkönig, which they were calling Der Erlkönig (the correct title is at the top of Schubert's holograph, which is actually included with the Wikipedia article). They also said that it was "arguably" the most famous setting of Goethe's poem, when there is no contest.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

piston
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Re: The worst history book ever?

Post by piston » Mon Mar 04, 2013 10:05 pm

There ain't no consensus about the origin of the name "Dixie." The assumption that it is derived from the name of Jeremiah Dixon, the surveyor from the 18th century, is just that, an assumption without any supporting primary sources. On the other hand, the Louisiana view that it originates from the French number "Dix" on a currency is supported by a 1916 source, not primary I know, which traces that possible origin to The Citizens' Bank and Trust Company, located on Gravier street in New Orleans. The 1916 source does recognize that "the origin of the word has never been positively determined," but that "the tradition" giving credit to that bank is stronger than any other claim. The country was then flooded with "mildcat money" and counterfeiting was so prevalent that it cast suspicion on any kind of paper money. But, so says the booklet, the notes of this bank commanded respect throughout much of the country. "It became so common when one was passing down the great river to trade at the Southern metropolis for him to say that he was going south to acquire so dixes. Thus it became known as the land of the dixies or "Dixie land.""
In the eyes of those lovers of perfection, a work is never finished—a word that for them has no sense—but abandoned....(Paul Valéry)

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