Bush Bashing Fizzles

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Corlyss_D
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Bush Bashing Fizzles

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 26, 2005 1:58 pm

By Michael Barone
Bush Bashing Fizzles

This summer, one big story is replaced by another--the London bombings July 7, the speculation that Karl Rove illegally named a covert CIA agent, the nomination of John Roberts to the Supreme Court, more London bombings last week. But beneath the hubbub, we can see the playing out of another, less reported story: the collapse of the attempts by liberal Democrats and their sympathizers in the mainstream media--the New York Times, etc., etc.--to delegitimize yet another Republican administration.

This project has been ongoing for more than 30 years. Richard Nixon, by obstructing investigation of the Watergate burglary, unwittingly colluded in the successful attempt to besmirch his administration. Less than two years after carrying 49 states, he was compelled to resign. The attempt to delegitimize the Reagan administration seemed at the time reasonably successful. Reagan was widely dismissed as a lightweight ideologue, and the rejection of his nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court in 1987 contributed to the impression that his years in office were, to take the title of a book by a first-rate journalist, "the Reagan detour." As time went on, as the Berlin Wall fell and Bill Clinton proclaimed that the era of big government was over, it became clear that Reagan was a successful transformational president--something the mainstream media grudgingly admitted when he died in 2004 after a decade out of public view.

You think they'd learn. But for the past five years, the same folks have been trying to undermine the presidency of George W. Bush. The Supreme Court's decision in Bush v. Gore was denounced as an outrage, and Democrats noted, accurately, that Bush did not win a plurality of the popular vote in 2000. The nation rallied to his support after September 11, but Democrats held up his judicial and other nominations even if they had to violate Senate tradition to do so. Coverage of Bush during the 2004 campaign was heavily negative; for months the mainstream media mostly ignored the swift boat vets' charges against John Kerry and broadcast accusations against Bush based on forged documents eight weeks before the election. News of economic recovery in 2003 and 2004 was pitched far more negatively than it had been when Bill Clinton was president in 1995 and 1996.

Now the unsupported charges that "Bush lied" about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq have been rekindled via criticism of Karl Rove. A key witness for the Democrats and mainstream media was former diplomat Joseph Wilson. Unfortunately for his advocates, he turned out to be a liar. A year after his famous article appeared in the New York Times in July 2003 accusing Bush of "twisting" intelligence, the Senate Intelligence Committee, in a bipartisan report, concluded that Wilson lied when he said his wife had nothing to do with his dispatch to Niger and Chairman Pat Roberts said that his report bolstered rather than refuted the case that Saddam Hussein's Iraq sought to buy uranium in Africa. So despite the continuing credulousness of much of the press, it appears inconceivable at this point that Karl Rove will be charged with violating the law prohibiting disclosure of the names of undercover agents. The case against Rove--ballyhooed by recent Time and Newsweek cover stories that paid little heed to the discrediting of Wilson--seems likely to end not with a bang but a whimper.

Court intrigue. So, too, with the political left's determination to defeat Bush's first nominee to the Supreme Court. Democrats, with much help from the press, argued successfully in 1987 that Robert Bork was out of the mainstream and in 1991 brought up spectacular charges that cast a pall on Justice Clarence Thomas. They seem almost certain not to have such success against the obviously highly qualified John Roberts. They may try to argue that Roberts is "out of the mainstream." But the vote on Roberts's nomination to the appeals court was 14 to 3 in the judiciary committee. Who is in the mainstream now?

The bombings and attempted bombings in London have brought home to the American public that we face implacable enemies unwilling to be appeased by even the most emollient diplomacy. Yet, mainstream media coverage of Iraq has been mostly negative. But mainstream media no longer have a monopoly; Americans have other sources in talk radio, Fox News, and the blogosphere. Bush's presidency is still regarded as illegitimate by perhaps 20 percent of the electorate. But among the rest, the attempt to delegitimize him seems to be collapsing.

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/opinion/ar ... barone.htm
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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 26, 2005 2:00 pm

I'm sure our resident skeptics won't let that stop them . . .
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Post by Ralph » Tue Jul 26, 2005 2:26 pm

I think "Bush Bashing" smply became boring. He'll never run again for anything so people are looking to the future.
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Re: Bush Bashing Fizzles

Post by karlhenning » Tue Jul 26, 2005 2:37 pm

Michael Barone wrote:... we can see the playing out of another, less reported story: the collapse of the attempts by liberal Democrats and their sympathizers in the mainstream media--the New York Times, etc., etc.--to delegitimize yet another Republican administration.
I am surprised that the obvious answer escapes Barone.

There is less effort to deligitimize an administration, whose self-destruction is becoming more and more a matter of public record :-)
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Re: Bush Bashing Fizzles

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 26, 2005 2:41 pm

karlhenning wrote:There is less effort to deligitimize an administration, whose self-destruction is becoming more and more a matter of public record :-)
Karl, put down the kool aid and step away from the table . . . .
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Post by Werner » Tue Jul 26, 2005 2:46 pm

This Mr. Barone seems well encapsulated in his own partisanship. But bringing up the Swift Boat veterans' ploy as a legitimate point goes too far.

By the way, the post gives no affiliation - or did I miss something? Anyway, who the heck is he?

I'm sure Corlyss will come up with ample evidence why I SHOULD know him. But I haven't missed him thus far.
Werner Isler

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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 26, 2005 2:58 pm

Werner wrote:This Mr. Barone seems well encapsulated in his own partisanship. But bringing up the Swift Boat veterans' ploy as a legitimate point goes too far.
Of course it's legitimate. Kerry's failure to respond to the Swifties' charges was the beginning of the end of his campaign, almost a year ago to the day. I called it then (my famously entitled post "Kaboom!" over at Classical Talk) as the thing most likely to defeat him because of what it said about the instincts of his operatives.
By the way, the post gives no affiliation - or did I miss something? Anyway, who the heck is he?

I'm sure Corlyss will come up with ample evidence why I SHOULD know him. But I haven't missed him thus far.
:lol: :lol: :lol: Sorry, Werner. I thought everyone knew who he is. He's one of the most influential chroniclers of the American Political Scene, founder and co-editor of The Almanac of American Politics, the biennial encyclopedia of every congressman and senator and congressional district in the nation. The only person on the planet who may know more about the voting habits and trends of Americans by state, city, county, town, and village is Karl Rove. He's a numbers guy. I'll edit the post to put in the source.
Last edited by Corlyss_D on Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:17 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Post by Werner » Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:06 pm

Thank you, Corlyss, and a deep bow of respect for competence and eminence - if not agreement.
Werner Isler

Ted

Post by Ted » Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:17 pm

Meanwhile CD, you were absolutely dead on re Rove
No longer the lead story—hardly a major story since London
t

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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:19 pm

Ted wrote:Meanwhile CD, you were absolutely dead on re Rove
No longer the lead story—hardly a major story since London
t
Well, thank you for noticing. Years of training in DC, Ted. Of course something could happen during the Roberts' hearings, but it will be no more than a blip.
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Ted

Post by Ted » Tue Jul 26, 2005 3:44 pm

Years of training in DC,
Ya know what, I don’t envy you CD.
I had the misfortune of working for an ad agency in DC for the spring and summer of 77 (Actually Rockville/Bethesda)
Isn’t it true that British Soldiers/Diplomats received “Hazardous Duty Pay” for suffering through Washington summers?

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Post by Ralph » Tue Jul 26, 2005 5:33 pm

Ted wrote:
Years of training in DC,
Ya know what, I don’t envy you CD.
I had the misfortune of working for an ad agency in DC for the spring and summer of 77 (Actually Rockville/Bethesda)
Isn’t it true that British Soldiers/Diplomats received “Hazardous Duty Pay” for suffering through Washington summers?
*****

And all federal law enforcement agents and staff receive a high COLA for accepting duty in the New York metropolitan area.

I've done D.C. summers and they're not THAT different from New York.
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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 26, 2005 5:45 pm

Ted wrote:
Years of training in DC,
Ya know what, I don’t envy you CD.
I had the misfortune of working for an ad agency in DC for the spring and summer of 77 (Actually Rockville/Bethesda)
Isn’t it true that British Soldiers/Diplomats received “Hazardous Duty Pay” for suffering through Washington summers?
We passed like ships in the night . . . I'm sorry you didn't get to be there during the fall, DC's best season. There's nothing quite like walking the city in the early days of October, when the days are warm and the nights cool, the tourists have all gone home and taken their loud bratty kids with them, and you can get into the museums without a shoehorn.

Not 'hazardous duty pay' but 'hardship pay' because the summers before A/C were brutal to people who think 3 days of 78 degree weather constitute a dangerous heat wave.

If you have never indulged in David Brinkley's Washington Goes to War about his youth in DC as a young reporter, it's worth every bit of the penny you can have it for on Amazon. That was the DC we moved to in 1955 minus the wartime glut of federal workers. I still regale non-Washingtonians with his story about how f'd up the city government was when it was all white, just to diabuse people of the notion that it might have suddenly become that way when the city got home rule.

The Way We Were
Coming of Age in Postwar Washington

Review by Jonathan Yardley
Sunday, March 6, 2005; Page T01

WHEN ALL THE WORLD WAS YOUNG

By Barbara Holland

Bloomsbury. 310 pp. $24.95

The setting for Barbara Holland's memoir -- a wise, funny, haunting and thoroughly grown-up book -- is Washington and its environs during the 1940s and '50s. This is of course the place where most readers of this newspaper now live, yet the Washington about which Holland writes is so distant in time and ambiance as to be located on another planet, if not in another solar system. Born there about seven decades ago, Holland had what was then an unconventional childhood -- her parents divorced when she was very young, her mother remarried to a man whom she did not like, her maternal grandmother became in many ways the most important person in her life -- but she has a keen memory of the conventions and customs of that time, and she brings them back to life with clarity and affection.

Holland, who now lives in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, has published a dozen books, too few of which seem to have found many readers. She seems to be able to write knowledgeably about almost anything she pleases -- her previous subjects have included cats, presidents of the United States, Katharine Hepburn and dueling -- but she is powerfully drawn to what she called, in the title of one of her books, Endangered Pleasures (1995), the subtitle of which is "In Defense of Naps, Martinis, Profanity and Other Indulgences." Never having met the lady, I cannot say this with absolute certainty, but all the evidence indicates that there is not a single politically correct bone in her body. In her previous books she has celebrated those pleasures that the health and PC police labor so hard to deny us, and she plays a variation on that theme in When All the World Was Young.

The pleasures celebrated this time around are those of a city and its suburbs (Holland grew up in Chevy Chase, just over the District line) to which development, sprawl and the K Street culture had not yet presented themselves. It will be pointed out, and properly so, that this was also a Washington in which white and black residents occupied separate universes, in which opportunities for blacks were stringently curtailed, but that was a reality of which Holland seems to have been entirely unaware as a girl, as doubtless were most if not all of her friends and, for that matter, white Washingtonians of any age and status. Given that Holland now has strong opinions about the place of women in American society, it stands to reason that she has comparable opinions about the place of blacks, but to impose today's attitudes on yesterday's story would be to twist the past to suit the convenience of the present.

This, much to her credit, Holland declines to do. She gives us the real world in which she grew up, rather than a fantasy dictated by the altered cultural and social assumptions of today. She readily acknowledges that memory is imperfect and unreliable -- "A memory is so gelatinous, waffling into this shape and that, until you say it out loud or write it down and it turns to stone, right or wrong, a fact" -- and it's a safe bet that she's got some of the details wrong, as all memoirists do. But the essential things she gets exactly right. She is nothing if not honest about herself, and the portrait she paints of the time and place of her youth rings entirely true.

I can say that with certainty because I was there: not in Washington, but in Pennsylvania and New York and Virginia in the same time. Though I am perhaps five years younger than Holland, the difference is meaningless, and though the biographical facts of our childhoods are almost entirely different, that too is meaningless. Though I had better luck with my "real" father than she did with her stepfather, I remember all too well the truth when she writes about Fathers, which she pointedly capitalizes:

"My friends and I were all deathly afraid of our fathers, which was right and proper and even biblically ordained. Fathers were angry; it was their job. . . . Fathers were the necessary antidote to Mothers, who by their very nature were fond and foolish and lacking in the firmness of character needed to put their foot down. Mothers could never say 'no,' Fathers rarely said anything else."

Certainly Holland feared her stepfather, and disliked him as well. He was a lawyer in the Labor Department, a stern and loyal New Dealer who nevertheless had nothing but contempt for the secretary of labor, Frances Perkins, for the simple reason that she was a woman. "Even now," she says, "and he's long dead, I'm afraid to write his name out, invoking bad luck, reprisals, ill winds," so she calls him Carl, "since that wasn't his name." In that day even those of us whose relationships with what we now call "male authority figures" were happier stood in fear of our fathers, who had not learned the lesson that the next generation would be taught, that kinder and gentler is better -- a lesson with which Holland probably would be quick to take exception, since she insists that "fear, pure and simple, [is] necessary nourishment for the growing child."

For her, love came from her grandmother, even though she was "undemonstrative, unsentimental." She kept her feelings to herself, but she was always there, and the example she set -- matter-of-fact competence, attentiveness, political independence -- had a powerful influence on the shaping of Holland's character. Her mother, Marion, "pretty as a peach and brilliant," had an extraordinary college career at Swarthmore, studied law for a year at Columbia, and "blazed forth into the world and then vanished, suburban mother of five, of all possible lives the least suitable." Her "secret passion" was carpentry, and she was exceptional at it, tangible evidence of just how out of step she was with her times. Not until World War II, when she took a job in the display department at Hecht's, did she really come into her own.

Eventually her mother (who to my taste is, apart from the author herself, the most appealing person in the book and its true heroine) found a career of her own. She wrote children's books, which were published by Knopf. Eventually there were about a dozen of them. They are now out of print, and "most of them are long forgotten, being about middle-class white children with such middle-class problems as wanting a dog or dropping a library book in the bathtub, but at the time they did well," and gave her mother "more money than could be swallowed up by summer day camps and autumn school shoes." Perhaps it is excessive to say that the example they set was the most important gift that mother gave to daughter, but surely it ranked way up there; though Holland, like her grandmother, eschews emotional display, the pride she takes in her mother's accomplishments is plain and affecting.

There was school, of course, which she loathed -- not least because she was an early and prodigious reader, which separated her from just about everyone else, made her "different," which no child likes to be -- and then there was the agony of junior high, "segregating children during their three most disastrous years so they could exercise the worst possible influence on each other." She did find a close, wonderful friend, Gloria, with whom for those three years she "had an ally, and an ally makes all the difference." Forces beyond anyone's control ended the friendship and left Holland bereft, though her gratitude toward and affection for Gloria are undimmed.

Holland recalls that friendship with clarity, as she recalls everything else. "Families were inextricably together," she writes. "Many siblings grew deeply, even morbidly, attached to each other, and many others became lifelong mortal enemies." Children? Sometimes kids hitchhiked: "No driver seemed surprised to see us; none molested or kidnapped us." Me too: As a teenager, I must have hitchhiked thousands of miles. "Somehow the safety of children, a subject of obsessive, passionate national concern today, simply didn't bother anyone I knew." Me too: Our parents tossed the kids into the back seat and off we rode, unencumbered by car seats or safety belts or anything else. Also: "Most children were unusual then. Different, one from the other. Various in flavor. It was before the invention of teenagers." Also, a sign posted at the National Zoo:

LOST CHILDREN WILL BE TAKEN

TO THE LION HOUSE

THE LIONS ARE FED AT 3 P.M.

A Washington forever lost. "The Senators gave their followers many stressful seasons and were rarely out of the basement, but Mother always said: 'Any fool can be a Yankees fan. It takes real talent to be a Senators fan.' " Everybody listened to the radio, "our ear on the world." Until "the mid-1950s, when air-conditioners started spreading from the movie theaters into the bedrooms, summer in Washington was infamous. People died. It put the British in mind of Calcutta and their diplomats drew hardship pay." Fear of polio "closed down the neighborhood swimming pools," because polio "was the faceless stalker. The hooded Horseman. It slunk around in silence, it crept up on small children, leaving them twisted." My own mother, terrified of polio, made us wear ungainly straw hats with wide brims; I never understood why.

Was it better then? Probably not, though it seems so to Holland and to me. Polio hadn't been brought under control. Men molested girls then as now -- "it was always beastly, frightening, sickening, and best forgotten, and I suppose it happened, one way or another, to every girl in the world" -- and Joe McCarthy spread fear around the city and the country. The Cold War -- the Bomb -- "soaked through our lives and colored our days like a toothache." Maybe the thing to say is that on the whole it was pretty good to have been there and then, but few of us would want to go back.

For all that, and for all the shortcomings and eccentricities of her own family, Holland had good times, and interesting ones, and she learned from them. You have to be on the alert to catch the moral of her tale, but it's right there in a couple of sentences about three-quarters of the way through: "Growing up is the process of learning how many things you can't do and how many people you can't be. When you've winnowed them out, what's left is you." That's what we used to call a home truth, but then so is everything else in this splendid book. •

Jonathan Yardley's e-mail address is yardleyj@washpost.com
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Post by Ralph » Tue Jul 26, 2005 6:41 pm

I've always enjoyed Washington and I've seen it change. The museums are great and there are many that don't attract hordes of visitors. In the summer, until about mid-July the service bands give outdoor concerts that are very fine.

In 67-68 when I was at the Pentagon few really good restaurants existed and I had neither the time nor the money for those that offered excellent cuisine. Today, D.C. restaurants are darn good overall with lots of choices.
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Ted

Post by Ted » Tue Jul 26, 2005 6:43 pm

I'm sorry you didn't get to be there during the fall, DC's best season
Don’t be sorry because my brother in law lived in DC and I was there at least once a month—every month for almost 19 years.
Thanks for the article
Oh and would you please tell Ralph that if he thinks DC Summers are the same as New York’s he needs to cut down on his intake of Sichuan (Szechuan ) peppers

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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 26, 2005 7:22 pm

Ralph wrote:And all federal law enforcement agents and staff receive a high COLA for accepting duty in the New York metropolitan area.
Many cities provoke the application of a COLA otherwise the feds could never get people to move there. The thumbnail for DC feds was, depending on where you transfer to, it was the equivalent of a one or two grade increase in pay. Similarly, getting people to move to DC was harder because of the differential. They had to be ambitious, have lived there before, or ignorant.
I've done D.C. summers and they're not THAT different from New York.
I dunno, Ralph. The humiture in DC for the number of days the high temps persist is withering. The summers (i.e., temps above 80 with humitigy above 70%) can start as early as the first week in March and end as late as the second week in Dec.
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Post by Ralph » Tue Jul 26, 2005 8:13 pm

Corlyss_D wrote:
Ralph wrote:And all federal law enforcement agents and staff receive a high COLA for accepting duty in the New York metropolitan area.
Many cities provoke the application of a COLA otherwise the feds could never get people to move there. The thumbnail for DC feds was, depending on where you transfer to, it was the equivalent of a one or two grade increase in pay. Similarly, getting people to move to DC was harder because of the differential. They had to be ambitious, have lived there before, or ignorant.
I've done D.C. summers and they're not THAT different from New York.
I dunno, Ralph. The humiture in DC for the number of days the high temps persist is withering. The summers (i.e., temps above 80 with humitigy above 70%) can start as early as the first week in March and end as late as the second week in Dec.
*****

I certainly don't remember summers like THAT or that LONG!
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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Jul 26, 2005 8:55 pm

Ralph wrote:
Corlyss_D wrote:
Ralph wrote:And all federal law enforcement agents and staff receive a high COLA for accepting duty in the New York metropolitan area.
Many cities provoke the application of a COLA otherwise the feds could never get people to move there. The thumbnail for DC feds was, depending on where you transfer to, it was the equivalent of a one or two grade increase in pay. Similarly, getting people to move to DC was harder because of the differential. They had to be ambitious, have lived there before, or ignorant.
I've done D.C. summers and they're not THAT different from New York.
I dunno, Ralph. The humiture in DC for the number of days the high temps persist is withering. The summers (i.e., temps above 80 with humitigy above 70%) can start as early as the first week in March and end as late as the second week in Dec.
*****

I certainly don't remember summers like THAT or that LONG!
You have to live there to see it day in and day out. No one summer lasted that long, but being where it is, it can get very unpleasantly warm early and stay unpleasantly warm late. One thing that always surprised me was how few recent records there were. You could have a day when you were sure the record was broken and you would see the news to discover that on that day in 1898 it was 3 degrees warmer.
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Jul 27, 2005 1:17 pm

Real-life commixx
KANSAS CITY, Missouri (AP) -- It may be President Bush's nickname for key political adviser Karl Rove, but some editors don't think it belongs in their newspapers.
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