Favorite 5 pieces

ichiro
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Favorite 5 pieces

Post by ichiro » Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:19 pm

OK i realise this may be a bit overdone, but I would like to know what your five favorite pieces are, just to get a general opinion, but also to expose me and everyone to pieces we need to hear. It may be hard coming up with just five, but I'll give it a go( there's a bit of a beethoven/brahms bias though).

1 Beethoven Moonlight Sonata, maybe not as complex as Beethoven's late period, but oh so beautiful, last movement is spectacular

2 Beethoven Sonata 32 Piano, opus 11. the last movement may be one the most spiritual and moving movements ever created

3 Beethoven Grosse Fuge, for me the ultimate mix of tension, spirituality, and archictecture ever

4 Beethoven 5th symphony tied with with Brahms 1st symphony-the two greatest and most exciting symphonies

5 Brahms opus 118 piano pieces. perhaps brahms' most touching work

I realise I had 6 (though one was tied), anyway, would love everyone's input

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Post by Panzerfaust » Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:00 pm

I can't place them in order, but here are five of my favorites:

Richard Wagner - Parsifal
Ludwig van Beethoven – 9th symphony
Philip Glass – Akhnaten
Dmitri Shostakovich – 7th symphony
Sergei Prokofiev - Alexander Nevsky
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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:07 pm

My list for today, which will be very different tomorrow:

1. Schubert's Winterreise

2. Verdi's Requiem

3. Bruckner Mass in f minor

4. Mahler 2nd Symphony

5. Brahms 4th Symphony

With many to choose from, 5 is very limited indeed. I note not one opera made it to my own list today, so I'd better fire up Medea or something tonight.

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Post by ch1525 » Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:48 pm

Here are 5 works that I really like (there's no way I could make a ranked list).

Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 3

Beethoven: Symphony No. 9

Mozart: Requiem

Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2

Chopin: Ballade No. 1 in G minor

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Post by lcarroll » Tue Feb 28, 2006 10:53 am

Mozart - Requiem
Rachmaninov - Concerto No 3
Rachmaninov - Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
Mahler - Symphony No. 3
Gorecki - Symphony No. 3 (Dawn Upshaw)

Wait, that was five already? Well, if one can allow two pieces by one composer to be one selection, then my fifth- sixth? - choice would be Godowsky's Passacaglia (transcription using the theme from Schubert's "Unfinished" Symphony)...
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Post by karlhenning » Tue Feb 28, 2006 11:11 am

Brendan wrote:My list for today, which will be very different tomorrow:
Entirely right! And my list today:

Schoenberg, Kammersymphonie Nr 1, Opus 9

Hindemith, Konzertmusik for piano, brass & harps, Opus 49

Prokofiev, Symphony-Concerto for cello and orchestra (God grant our neighbor Peter Schenkman rest!)

Boulez, Le marteau sans maître

Stravinsky, Concerto per due pianoforti
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Post by Barry » Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:26 pm

Beethoven's third symphony
Bruckner's eighth symphony
Verdi's Requiem
Brahms first piano concerto
Schubert's ninth symphony

The first three are always going to be on that list, but the last two could change from week to week or even day to day, depending on my mood or what's in my head. I could easily put another Beethoven or Bruckner symphony or a Brahms symphony in there and leave out the Brahms concerto or the Schubert symphony.
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Post by BWV 1080 » Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:37 pm

Overlapping today with Karl on Le marteau sans maître

also:
Carter: Syringa
Lutoslawski: Symphony #3
Ligeti: Etudes (particularly Book I #4 Fanfares)
Bartok: String Quartet #3

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Post by jbuck919 » Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:39 pm

Years ago, when there was a Washington version of Desert Island Disks that had many distinguished guests, I set up my own list, knowing that one day they would call and have me a guest on the program (the same way Ralph was a candidate for one of those vacancies on the Supreme Court).

My choice has never changed over the years. It is not my list of five greatest pieces, but it offers a sufficient scope that it is possible I could live with it and nothing more while literally stranded on a desert island. You will notice that there is a theme, which I did not intend, but which fell out by accident.

Bach: St. Matthew Passion
Haydn: Creation
Beethoven: Missa Solemnis
Brahms: German Requiem
Wagner: Parsifal

Of course, my book (you are given Shakespeare and the Bible) is the Liber Usualis so I could sing the Gregorian to myself every day, and my luxury item is a piano with all the scores I could desire, so that does rather obviate the restriction.

One of the guests on the Washington edition of DID was Jonas Salk, the inventor of the polio vaccine. I forget his musical selections, though I remember that they were very excellent, but he said that his luxury item would be a supply of gourmet food and a beautfiul woman because sex is so important (he literally said that). More power to him, I suppose.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
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Post by Richard Mullany » Tue Feb 28, 2006 4:50 pm

The two double Violin Concerti by Bach. The slow movement from the first concerto is, to me, all in all. Those interweaving themes in the never leave my mind, I can't imagine not having them nearby. The one by the Oistrachs, father and son, recorded on a brief trip to the free world capture so much more than mere sound, it catches two souls. On DG.
The Palestrina Requiem. Here is a form usually using an army of musicians but is scored here for a capella. The only recording I know of is by Chanticleer on Telarc. Twelve voices that leave me limp.
The Berlioz Requiem. There are times when you want an army. I've gone through many versions dating back to 78's on Columbia, recorded in Paris pre-WW2. A rather wheezy Westminster, A fine BSO Munch, but I like the ASO Shaw on Telarc for its sound qualities; the Dies Irae is searing brass.
The chorus is lusty.
Wagner orchestral music, Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra. This was originally on two lp's but later reissued first by Columbia and later on Sony. The Sony shares space with Ormandy and the PO. The Cleveland Prelude to act one of Lohengrin is, for me, one of those things I would grab if the house was on fire. Again, for me, it is Wagner brought to life. It shows what happens when there is no doubt at all about who rules. It is Szell. I understandc he was ruthless in rehearsal; it shows.
I am at or over five, so be it.

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Tue Feb 28, 2006 5:56 pm

Today's list:

Bruckner - Te Deum
Chopin - Mazurkas
Schubert - 2nd piano trio
Haydn - 18th piano trio
Janacek - The Cunning Little Vixen

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Post by val » Wed Mar 01, 2006 4:11 am

The best five:

Beethoven: Piano Sonata opus 106

Beethoven: Quartet opus 132

Bach: Missa in B minor

Bruckner: 9th Symphony

Wagner: Parsifal

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Post by Jack Kelso » Wed Mar 01, 2006 7:09 am

Here's my "Five", with the slight adjustment that these might be the works that would keep me happy longest. Eventually, however, I would tire of ANY given five works.

1. SCHUMANN: "Szenen aus Goethes 'Faust' für Soli, Chor und Orchester"

2. HANDEL: "Samson" (Oratorio)

3. MOZART: "Die Zauberflöte" Opera (in German)

4. BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 9 in d-minor, opus 125

5. BACH: Mass in b minor

No special order---with only five pieces to choose from, they MUST be about equal! Now, where's the gourmet food and dancing girls?!

Jack
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Mar 01, 2006 9:15 am

My list today:

Schoenberg, Gurrelieder

Bartók, Concerto for Orchestra

Prokofiev, Violin Sonata in F Minor

Shostakovich, Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Opus 43

Berlioz, Grande Messe des morts
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Post by lmpower » Wed Mar 01, 2006 3:03 pm

Bach St. Matthew Passion
Mozart Magic Flute
Beethoven String quartet opus 132
Brahms Clarinet quintet
Mahler Symphony #10

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Post by BWV 1080 » Wed Mar 01, 2006 3:28 pm

Bartok - Violin Sonata #2
Scarlatti - Sonatas K208/209
Finnissy - Above Earth's Shadow
Mozart - SQ K428
Bartok - SQ #3

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Post by Cyril Ignatius » Wed Mar 01, 2006 4:29 pm

My list today:

Cavalleria Rusticana, by Pietro Mascagni.

Brahms Alt Rhapsody

Susanin's Aria, by Glinka - "A Life of the Tsar"

Barcarolle, by Chopin

Mahler, Symphony No. 4
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Post by capnreverb » Wed Mar 01, 2006 5:38 pm

Well today it would be

Quincy Porter's seventh string quartet
Billy Jim Layton's String Quartet In Two Movements
George Rochberg's Third string quartet
Schnittke's Piano Quintet
Erwin Schulhoff's first string quartet




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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Wed Mar 01, 2006 7:10 pm

Todays list:

Schubert - Ave Maria
Hildegard von Bingen - Chants
Wagner - The Flying Dutchman
Brahms - 1st piano quartet
Bach- 3rd cello suite

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Post by RebLem » Thu Mar 02, 2006 12:52 am

Handel: Messiah--Mackerras is the only recording for me.
Dvorak: American Quartet
Shostakovich: Piano Quintet
Stravinsky: Le Sacre du Printemps
Beethoven: Sym 9
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Post by RebLem » Thu Mar 02, 2006 1:57 am

And if you will indulge me, I would like to list 6-10 as well. :D

Mahler: Sym 2 "Resurrection"
Joplin: Treemonisha
Byrd: Mass in 4 Parts
Beethoven: SQ 15
Prokofiev: Sym 1 "Classical"
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Post by Jack Kelso » Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:05 am

I feel compelled to make a couple of observations on this thread.

First off, many of the "5 favorites" are rather short works (chamber or piano pieces), which don't offer as much musical substance as longer compositions with larger forces - so one might speculate that the contributors of these might be hoping for an early rescue from the proverbial desert isle.

Many favorites are now forwarded with "today's list", indicating that there may postal deliveries of new CD's in the ensuing few days or weeks (does the "desert isle" have a landing field or docking area for ships?).

For my own part, all five of my choices are large-scale works which should keep me busy singing to my lonesome (until someone finds my ocean-bound bottle-with-a-message), discovering new depths of expression.

They are not necessarily my 5 TOP favorite works, but all written in five wonderfully great and differentiated styles - to make for a new mood for each few hours.

Interestingly, Wagner's "Der Ring der Niebelungen" quartet of music-dramas wasn't mentioned by anyone (not even by me!), even though it would count only as "one".

Let's see what new "goodies" this thread brings with it - as we all struggle for survival in the best way possible: burying our fears and boredom and sunnying our thoughts in the wonderful world of tonal art.

Jack
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Post by ichiro » Thu Mar 02, 2006 2:11 pm

Just to point out, most of the chamber music mentioned is pretty substantial in terms of time, being multi-movement works, as are many of the piano works.

my other question is, do you truly believe that short pieces offer less substance than large-scale works? My view is that (although not exclusively), shorter pieces, especially piano pieces, are often the most compelling and substantive of all works ( brahms late piano pieces being one example). My question, then is, what do you think of Chopin, considering almost all he wrote was short and small-scale?

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Post by jbuck919 » Thu Mar 02, 2006 2:18 pm

ichiro wrote:Just to point out, most of the chamber music mentioned is pretty substantial in terms of time, being multi-movement works, as are many of the piano works.

my other question is, do you truly believe that short pieces offer less substance than large-scale works? My view is that (although not exclusively), shorter pieces, especially piano pieces, are often the most compelling and substantive of all works ( brahms late piano pieces being one example). My question, then is, what do you think of Chopin, considering almost all he wrote was short and small-scale?
The greatest works of Chopin--the ballades, the scherzos and a handful of unique works with another title--are not short. They are not as long as a Beethoven symphony, but they are works of great scope and power, just as long as they need to be, so to speak. Your question was about the five favorite works, and most people are not going to name a single piano piece short of the scale of the Beethoven Op 106 if you make that huge demand on them.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by karlhenning » Thu Mar 02, 2006 3:44 pm

Aujourd'hui:

Varèse, Déserts

Rakhmaninov, All-Night Vigil

Hindemith, Konzertmusik for piano, brass and harps, Opus 49

Schoenberg, String Trio Opus 45

Bartók, Sonata for two pianos and percussion
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Brendan

Post by Brendan » Thu Mar 02, 2006 4:18 pm

Just wanting to point out that no 'desert island' was mentioned in the opening of this thread, just 'your 5 favourite pieces' which for me is rather a different choice, one that varies day to day.

Today's 5:

Schubert: 9th Symphony
Beethoven: Missa Solemnis
Brahms: German Requiem
Chopin: Etudes
Mozart: Masonic Funeral Music

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Post by DavidRoss » Thu Mar 02, 2006 4:45 pm

A list of 5 favorite pieces:

Sibelius, Lemminkäinen Legends
Sibelius, Tapiola
Sibelius, Symphony 4
Sibelius, Symphony 5
Brahms, Violin Concerto
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Post by ichiro » Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:07 pm

Short of starting a new thread altogether, maybe i should just briefly rephrase the request to supplying your five "desert island pieces", the ones you would take with you above all else, although i'm sure this is no easy proposition.

Brendan

Post by Brendan » Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:25 pm

Since the 'desert island' thought experiment is so unrelated to any listening I will ever do, I'll bail out of making any such list. Why strain my brain for five works when I've got thousands sitting next to me on the shelves? Anywhere (imaginary 'desert island') that has a stereo also has power and therefore telephony and access to Amazon or Tower or another internet supplier. The 'desert island discs' thought experiment was dreamed up long before online shopping existed.

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Post by karlhenning » Thu Mar 02, 2006 9:10 pm

ichiro wrote:Short of starting a new thread altogether, maybe i should just briefly rephrase the request to supplying your five "desert island pieces", the ones you would take with you above all else, although i'm sure this is no easy proposition.
If I were simply a listener, well, I should choose five pieces with which I was already dissatisfied, because being restricted to only five pieces because I am trapped on an island is an odious proposition -- if I took five pieces which I like a great deal at the beginnig of the imprisonment, I am very likely to grow to hate them, and I would not willingly do that to five pieces I like a great deal.

But, I am not simply a listener, I am a composer. I do not need even five; if I am imprisoned on an island, I have all the time in the world to compose, and I would do that sooner than listen to the same five pieces over and over again.

Cheers,
~Karl

PS/ Having indulged the inevitable "desert island" wrinkle on this question, I happily go back to "five best-liked pieces du jour":

Berlioz, L'enfance du Christ

Prokofiev, Romeo & Juliet

Debussy, Sonata for flute, viola & harp

Hindemith, Symphony Mathis der Maler

Stravinsky, L'oiseau de feu
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Post by Jack Kelso » Fri Mar 03, 2006 1:30 am

karlhenning wrote:If I were simply a listener, well, I should choose five pieces with which I was already dissatisfied, because being restricted to only five pieces because I am trapped on an island is an odious proposition -- if I took five pieces which I like a great deal at the beginnig of the imprisonment, I am very likely to grow to hate them, and I would not willingly do that to five pieces I like a great deal.
Of course! My choices certainly change at least as often as my underwear. Don't take my posting too seriously, but I couldn't resist the humor.

I took the "desert island" idea from one of John Buck's postings and from 1950's music/sport critic (Sir) Neville Cardus, who claimed he would take Brahms if he were stranded on such an island and could only listen to one composer.

To the question of small vs. large works---naturally longer pieces generally do have more material and expressive possibilities. As a Schumann (and Chopin) lover I recognize the poetic content of the smaller forms as well. They are more apt to be near perfect, but larger works contain....hm....well, just more stuff.

Jack
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Post by RebLem » Fri Mar 03, 2006 1:38 am

Brendan wrote:Since the 'desert island' thought experiment is so unrelated to any listening I will ever do, I'll bail out of making any such list. Why strain my brain for five works when I've got thousands sitting next to me on the shelves? Anywhere (imaginary 'desert island') that has a stereo also has power and therefore telephony and access to Amazon or Tower or another internet supplier. The 'desert island discs' thought experiment was dreamed up long before online shopping existed.
And a big Bah, Humbug to you, too !
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Post by jbuck919 » Fri Mar 03, 2006 3:02 am

Just for the record, I did not mean to hijack the thread with the desert island take on it. I find it impossible to list five favorite works even for today, so I fell back on my desert island choices, which have not changed over the years, because they are of sufficient scope that I could imagine recycling them over a long period of time. But like everyone else here, I could never be happy with just five pieces.

If we were really stranded, the most remarkable things might happen (like at my age and with my lack of self-discipline I'd probably die, but that's not quite my point). Alexander Selkirk, the model for Robinson Crusoe, actually became fit enough to overtake and kill the wild goats on his island for food. He grew to love his solitary life and always regretted returning to civilization. Marynoll Missionary Bishop James Walsh was "marooned" in a Chinese prison for something like 20 years in solitary confinement, a situation that would drive most people mad, but he survived by mentally reciting (from memory) the Divine Office all day long.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

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Post by Jack Kelso » Fri Mar 03, 2006 3:44 am

jbuck919 wrote:Just for the record, I did not mean to hijack the thread with the desert island take on it.
Tush, tush, John---don't get a bad conscience. You didn't hijack the thread. You just gave me an idea to put a different twist on it.

A little harmless pressure can bring out the best works in us...in this case, our true favorites.

Tschüß,
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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Post by fourseasons » Fri Mar 03, 2006 9:55 pm

This was certainly a hard decision, but here are five pieces that I find phenomenal:

Handel-Watermusic
Mozart-Requiem
Vivaldi-The Four Seasons
Bach-The Magnificat
Pachelbel-Canon in D

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Post by Richard Mullany » Sat Mar 04, 2006 8:24 pm

I take the thread to be about five pieces you would want above all others and I find such a list to be fairly easy. My choices either require me to solve something in the music that presents itself every time I hear it or which lets me sit back and enjoy; which lets me feel liberated or free, as if I really did understand something. The same music creates both conditions for me.

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Post by ratsrcute » Sun Mar 05, 2006 2:33 pm

Basically line up all of Bach's chamber works and all of Mozart's mature piano concertos on a wall, through five darts at them and those would be the five I pick.

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Post by karlhenning » Mon Mar 06, 2006 8:32 am

Richard Mullany wrote:I take the thread to be about five pieces you would want above all others and I find such a list to be fairly easy.
There, I marvel at you. I find such a list impossible.
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Post by karlhenning » Mon Mar 06, 2006 10:08 am

And today's list:

Bartók, Dance Suite

Honegger, Symphony No. 5 'Di tre re'

Varèse, Octandre

de Victoria, Misa O magnum mysterium

Berlioz, Harold en Italie
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Post by Jack Kelso » Tue Mar 07, 2006 1:05 am

karlhenning wrote:And today's list:

Bartók, Dance Suite

Honegger, Symphony No. 5 'Di tre re'

Varèse, Octandre

de Victoria, Misa O magnum mysterium

Berlioz, Harold en Italie
That's really funny---since over a week the Berlioz symphony has been going through my head, despite playing it three times! No wonder Paganini admired the work so much!

Tschüß,
Jack
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Post by Richard Mullany » Tue Mar 07, 2006 3:51 pm

karlhenning: At my age and in failing health I have learned to relegate much of what once was vital to me to the status of "nice but I don't need it quite as badly as before" I can list some crucial, to me, books and paintings and films and people too. Perhaps "easy" is too facile a term.
In any event there is a ton of music to consider when we engage in these lists and while it's foolish in many respects it's still sort of fun. Of course it means nothing at the end...there is music unheard, books unread and art unseen, to take into account.

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Wed Mar 08, 2006 8:46 am

Fair enough, Richard.
Karl Henning, PhD
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dirkronk
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Post by dirkronk » Wed Mar 08, 2006 12:26 pm

karlhenning wrote:And today's list:

Bartók, Dance Suite

Honegger, Symphony No. 5 'Di tre re'

Varèse, Octandre

de Victoria, Misa O magnum mysterium

Berlioz, Harold en Italie
MO-O-O-O-O-O-M!!!
KARL KEEPS CHANGIN' HIS ANSWER-R-R-R-R. NOT FA-A-A-A-A-I-I-I-R-R-R.

IcedNote
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Post by IcedNote » Wed Apr 05, 2006 10:06 am

I'll play.

In no order....and I'll use 5 different composers....

- Beethoven - Symphony No 9 in Dm
- Chopin - Prelude No 4 in Em
- Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto No. 3 in Dm
- Albeniz - Suite Espanola (arr. by Segovia for guitar)
- Debussy - Nuages

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

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Post by karlhenning » Wed Apr 05, 2006 1:12 pm

Today's list:

Bartók, Cantata profana

Hindemith, Konzertmusik Opus 48 for viola and large chamber orchestra

Mozart, C Minor Mass K.427

Schuller, Seven Studies on Themes of Paul Klee

Berlioz, Grande Messe des morts
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
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http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
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greymouse
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Post by greymouse » Wed Apr 05, 2006 4:04 pm

This was very brutal, but I reluctantly narrowed it down to a prominent 5 pieces that have been defining for me:

1. Ravel - Gaspard de la Nuit
2. Tchaikovsky - Nutcracker
3. Brahms - Symphony No. 3
4. Stravinsky - Mass
5. Handel - Messiah

Forgive me, but honorable mentions go to:

Schoenberg - 3 piano pieces Op. 11
Glass - Mad Rush

... and I better stop before I gush with about 20 more pieces.

Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Thu Apr 06, 2006 1:28 am

My favorite LISTening this last week:

HANDEL: "Samson" oratorio

SCHUMANN: Piano Quartet in D Minor (1830)

MOZART: Clarinet Concerto in A Minor, KV 622

WAXMAN (WACHSMANN): Complete music from the film, "The Bride of Frankenstein" (1935) (stereo recording)

GOLDMARK: Symphony No. 2 in E-Flat

Tschüß,
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

taisiawshan
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Post by taisiawshan » Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:22 am

I don't know much about classical music. The following 6 pieces are those which I'm familiar with & will get captivated everytime I listen to them:
1, Bach: Suite for orchestra No 3 in D major, BWV 1068- Air
2, Bach: Well tempered clavier book 1, No. 1 in C major, BWV 846-
Prelude
3, The Butterfly Lovers Violin Concerto
4, Pachelbel: Canon in D Major
5, Beethoven: Symphony No. 6, 'Pastoral'
6, Beethoven: Symphony no 7, 2nd movement

There are also music pieces that I like but not very familiar with:
1, Brahms: Symphony No. 4
2, Dvorak: Symphonies 9 'From The New World'
3, Schubert: "Unfinished" symphony
4, Chopin: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2
5, Rachmaninov: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 - 4
6, Most of Mozart's music I've heard
7, Most of Beethoven's music I've heard

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Post by karlhenning » Thu Apr 06, 2006 7:15 am

greymouse wrote:This was very brutal, but I reluctantly narrowed it down to a prominent 5 pieces that have been defining for me:

1. Ravel - Gaspard de la Nuit
2. Tchaikovsky - Nutcracker
3. Brahms - Symphony No. 3
4. Stravinsky - Mass
5. Handel - Messiah
That is one fine list.
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Thu Apr 06, 2006 7:16 am

Jack Kelso wrote:MOZART: Clarinet Concerto in A Minor, KV 622
Jack, you joker! The Concerto is of course in A Major.
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

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