Favorite 5 pieces

Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Thu Apr 06, 2006 7:25 am

karlhenning wrote:
Jack Kelso wrote:MOZART: Clarinet Concerto in A Minor, KV 622
Jack, you joker! The Concerto is of course in A Major.
Oooops, I just saw that typo now! Thanks, Karl....what was I thinking of...?!

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

einstein63
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Post by einstein63 » Sun Apr 09, 2006 2:06 pm

Mozart. Requiem
Brahms. Op. 118
Satie. 6 Gnossiennes
Glass. Metamorphosis
Bach. V. Goldberg

Gustaw_PL
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Post by Gustaw_PL » Wed Apr 19, 2006 1:52 pm

For me it'd be (a very tough choice, indeed):

1) Beethoven: Missa Solemnis

2) Beethoven: 5th Symphony

3) Brahms: Deutsches Requiem

4) Wagner: Lohengrin

5) Brahms: Double Concerto


Besides, I just have to mention Brahms' Violin Concerto, Beethoven's 5th and 9th, Dvorak's Cello Concerto and... Debussy's Clair de Lune.. :wink:
<b>"Man, help yourself"</b> - Beethoven

Dr Fager
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Post by Dr Fager » Fri Apr 21, 2006 5:12 pm

Being a complete nerd for the music now and wanting to compile a better list of works to buy ive done some data crunching on the results of this thread thus far.

Here is the top 5 selections listed thus far with the amount of times it has been selected in parenthesis....

1. Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (5)
2. Mozart: Requiem (4)
3t. Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto No. 3 in Dm (3)
3t. Richard Wagner - Parsifal (3)
5t. Beethoven 5th symphony (2)
5t. Bach: Mass in b minor (2)
5t. Bach: St. Matthew Passion (2)
5t. Handel - Messiah (2)
5t. Verdi- Requiem (2)

Also here is the top composers by amount of times their works were voted for...

1. Beethoven (16)
2. Brahms (9)
3. Bach (7)
4. Mozart (6)
5. Rachmaninoff (5)
6t. Handel (4)
6t. Wagner (4)
6t. Bruckner (4)
9t. Mahler (3)
9t. Stravinsky (3)
9t. Shubert (3)
9t. Chopin (3)

What ive learned? Beethoven is the man! I didnt really care for his 5th symphony. The 9th was pretty intresting. The opening reminded me of a rock groups entrance where they feedback and kind of shadow things to come. His opening sounds like he is just letting you know "im about to bring it, get ready". I found the work good, not great until the final movement. Ive got to admit ive never been so excited about a peice of classical music as when i heard the choral work in the final movement. It made me get up and air-conduct! Absolutely the most moving part of classical music ive heard in my now 5 week voyage :wink: After looking at these results im going to have to keep hammering at Beethoven's works i have (5/7/9 symphonies).

Additionally, i see that as a huge Motzart fan (my favorite composer thus far) i have to get his requiem.

I also need to add Rachmaninoff, Handel, Wagner, Bruckner to my list. Ive overlooked them thus far.

Ive got to say im loving this new music. What an intesting world of sounds ive never given a chance prior.

Mark Antony Owen
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Post by Mark Antony Owen » Sat Apr 22, 2006 3:05 am

If my house was burning down, here are the five works I'd run back in to save:


1) Rachmaninov - All-night Vigil

2) Sibelius - Violin Concerto

3) Grieg - Piano Concerto

4) Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 'Choral'

5) Pergolesi - Stabat Mater
"Neti, neti."

Formerly known as 'shadowritten'.

Ricordanza
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Post by Ricordanza » Sat Apr 22, 2006 7:15 am

Narrowing the list to five is really hard, but if I concentrate on categories (symphony, chamber work, piano concerto, violin concerto, solo piano piece), here's what I come up with. But ask me tomorrow, and the list (except for the first entry) may be different:

1. Beethoven, Symphony No. 9
2. Dvorak, Piano Quintet
3. Brahms, Piano Concerto No. 1
4. Beethoven, Violin Concerto
5. Liszt, Sonata in B minor

Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Mon Apr 24, 2006 12:38 am

I find it interesting (and amusing!) that I am the only listener thus far to post any works of Schumann---although all the other 19th century composers of note (pun intended!) have been mentioned.

When one considers how often Schumann appears on radio and in concert halls this is quite an amazing situation!

Although I've managed to list five works I truly love, I cannot state which "5" works could possibly be my favorites of all time (not even by any one composer) since I enjoy far too many styles, forms and levels of expression.

Like Karl Henning, my appetites vary from week to week; sometimes I want to listen to works I know intimately--other times to works I barely know or are totally new to me. As opposed to many postings here, mine are practically meaningless from a long-term point of view (and having been rescued from that desert isle!).

But it's still fun to make lists; it's an all-American pasttime.

Tschüß,
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

Ken
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Post by Ken » Thu May 04, 2006 10:37 am

Here's what I have been favouring lately, in no particular order:

- Edvard Grieg's Holberg Suite (has anyone else noticed how difficult it is to get an affordable recording of this sans the Peer Gynt nonsense?)

- Antonin Dvorak's Symphony no.9 'From the New World': I'm surprised not many people have mentioned this one!

- Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition: I enjoy the original piano version, but favour Ravel's orchestrated piece.

- Robert Schumann's Symphony no.3 'Rhenish': Pompous and exciting! 'Nuff said.

- Beethoven's Symphony no.6 'Pastorale': Discussed in another thread by me... Can you hear the gathering merry country folk?

srappoport
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Post by srappoport » Thu May 04, 2006 2:07 pm

My list of five is arbitrary. They are here just because ...

1. Verdi's Don Carlo.

2. Verdi's Un ballo in maschera ( a work that I would not have included except for the fact that I attended three performances over a period of two weeks and each time came away with an even better understanding; I would have gone a fourth if there had been any more performances)

3. Schubert's Quintet with two celli (or would you prefer cellos?)

4. any of Mozart's K. 488, K. 491, or K. 503 (which I have just heard twice on successive days)

5. maybe Brahms' Double Concerto

Lark Ascending
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Post by Lark Ascending » Fri May 05, 2006 2:20 pm

My favourite 5 are:

Vaughan Williams - The Lark Ascending
Ravel - Mother Goose Suite
Butterworth - The Banks of Green Willow
Shostakovich - Jazz Suite No.2
Chopin - Nocturnes, especially No 10 in A flat
"Look here, I have given up my time, my work, my friends and my career to come here and learn from you, and I am not going to write a petit menuet dans le style de Mozart." - Ralph Vaughan Williams to Maurice Ravel

Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Mon May 08, 2006 1:44 am

keninottawa wrote:- Robert Schumann's Symphony no.3 'Rhenish': Pompous and exciting! 'Nuff said.
That's pretty funny. I've never heard it described like that.

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

Ken
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Post by Ken » Mon May 08, 2006 2:41 pm

Jack Kelso wrote:
keninottawa wrote:- Robert Schumann's Symphony no.3 'Rhenish': Pompous and exciting! 'Nuff said.
That's pretty funny. I've never heard it described like that.

Jack
You mean the timpani in the opening movement doesn't do it for ya? :wink:

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Post by karlhenning » Mon May 08, 2006 2:53 pm

Today's list:

Messiaen, Quatuor pour la fin du temps

Hindemith, Symphony in E-flat

Prokofiev, Symphony No. 7

Sibelius, Symphony No. 3

Berlioz, Les Troyens
Karl Henning, PhD
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srappoport
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Post by srappoport » Mon May 08, 2006 3:26 pm

karlhenning wrote:Today's list:

Messiaen, Quatuor pour la fin du temps

Hindemith, Symphony in E-flat

Prokofiev, Symphony No. 7

Sibelius, Symphony No. 3

Berlioz, Les Troyens
A fresh list every day? Wouldn't that mean a fresh desert island every day? So how do you move the Thousand Islands to the South Pacific and give them sandy beaches?

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Post by karlhenning » Mon May 08, 2006 3:34 pm

srappoport wrote:A fresh list every day?
Yes, as I find the question fundamentally impossible :-)
Wouldn't that mean a fresh desert island every day?
If I could have only five recordings on a desert island, I wouldn't choose the five pieces I like the best, because I'd get tired of them, disgusted with them, after overexposure. So I admit that I have been cited for non-compliance with the Desert Island Scenario :-)
Karl Henning, PhD
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srappoport
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Post by srappoport » Mon May 08, 2006 3:50 pm

karlhenning wrote:If I could have only five recordings on a desert island, I wouldn't choose the five pieces I like the best, because I'd get tired of them, disgusted with them, after overexposure. So I admit that I have been cited for non-compliance with the Desert Island Scenario :-)
There is something to what you are saying. But I recently attended three performances of Un ballo in maschera and was ready for more, as I was finding that the more I watched and heard it, the more I was understanding what Verdi was doing. Perhaps 85 times would be too much though.

I had a recent experience with a concert consisting of Mozart's overture to Cossi fan tutti, his 25th concerto, and his 39th symphony. I went to both performances (by the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia) because I like the concerto so much. There are two more concerts of Mozart's works, and I proably will do the same thing again.

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Post by Corlyss_D » Mon May 08, 2006 4:33 pm

srappoport wrote:I was finding that the more I watched and heard it, the more I was understanding what Verdi was doing. Perhaps 85 times would be too much though.
Check out Julian Budden's masterful 3-volume work on Verdi's operas, and Vincent Godefroy's 2-volume work on same. It could cut down considerably the number of hearings just to appreciate what Verdi was doing. When you get ready for Aida, check out Hans Busch's Verdi's Aida. Well worth the effort to get it and read up on the opera beforehand.
I had a recent experience with a concert consisting of Mozart's overture to Cossi fan tutti, his 25th concerto, and his 39th symphony. I went to both performances (by the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia) because I like the concerto so much. There are two more concerts of Mozart's works, and I proably will do the same thing again.
:D I used to do that too, esp. opera. I had two season tickets to the Washington Opera back when their season consisted of 4 operas (the 70s).
Corlyss
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BWV 1080
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Post by BWV 1080 » Mon May 08, 2006 9:09 pm

Today's shipment of CD's washed ashore on the desert island:

Wolpe - Piece for Two Instrumental Units
Carter - Piano Concerto
Boulez - Derive II
Lutoslawski - Cello Concerto
Ligeti - Piano Concerto

anasazi
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Post by anasazi » Tue May 09, 2006 12:44 am

Only five. Gee, what can't I live without?

Ravel's Mother Goose suite.
Beethoven's Emperor Concerto.
Vaughan Williams' Symphony #5.
Mozart's Clarinet Concerto.
Puccini's "Turandot".
"Take only pictures, leave only footprints" - John Muir.

Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Tue May 09, 2006 1:00 am

keninottawa wrote:
Jack Kelso wrote:
keninottawa wrote:- Robert Schumann's Symphony no.3 'Rhenish': Pompous and exciting! 'Nuff said.
That's pretty funny. I've never heard it described like that.

Jack
You mean the timpani in the opening movement doesn't do it for ya? :wink:
Sure--like Brahms' First (6/8) opposed to 3/4 (Schumann's Third). But I don't hear any "pompous" tones there....

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue May 09, 2006 8:27 am

srappoport wrote:There is something to what you are saying. But I recently attended three performances of Un ballo in maschera and was ready for more, as I was finding that the more I watched and heard it, the more I was understanding what Verdi was doing. Perhaps 85 times would be too much though.
Certainly, the many riches of the literature repay sustained and repeated visitation!
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
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karlhenning
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Post by karlhenning » Tue May 09, 2006 8:29 am

Today's list:

Boulez, Pli selon pli

Stravinsky, Svadebka (Les noces)

Prokofiev, Le pas d'acier

Tchaikovsky, Francesca da Rimini

Shostakovich, The Execution of Stepan Razin
Karl Henning, PhD
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Ken
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Post by Ken » Tue May 09, 2006 1:47 pm

Jack Kelso wrote: Sure--like Brahms' First (6/8) opposed to 3/4 (Schumann's Third). But I don't hear any "pompous" tones there....

Jack
I suppose by 'pompous' I meant 'with much pomp' as opposed to 'pretentious and snooty'. Schumann doesn't strike me as the snooty type!

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Post by karlhenning » Tue May 09, 2006 2:24 pm

keninottawa wrote:I suppose by 'pompous' I meant 'with much pomp' as opposed to 'pretentious and snooty'. Schumann doesn't strike me as the snooty type!
I guessed that was what you had in view, Ken; it is curious that in our day, so many take pompous right away as pejorative! I caught myself in this, when we were reading Stainer's The Crucifixion in choir a year or so ago . . . a couple of passages are marked Pomposo, and it was all I could do to keep from laughing.

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
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Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Wed May 10, 2006 12:11 am

karlhenning wrote:
keninottawa wrote:I suppose by 'pompous' I meant 'with much pomp' as opposed to 'pretentious and snooty'. Schumann doesn't strike me as the snooty type!
I guessed that was what you had in view, Ken; it is curious that in our day, so many take pompous right away as pejorative! I caught myself in this, when we were reading Stainer's The Crucifixion in choir a year or so ago . . . a couple of passages are marked Pomposo, and it was all I could do to keep from laughing.

Cheers,
~Karl
Agreed! May I welcome myself to the club...?!

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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Post by karlhenning » Wed May 10, 2006 10:15 am

Allow me to extend an invitation, Jack :-)
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Post by srappoport » Wed May 10, 2006 1:48 pm

Mr. Henning, where is your list for today?

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Post by karlhenning » Thu May 11, 2006 7:39 am

A Command Performance! 8)

Wuorinen, Mass for the Restoration of St Luke's

Stravinsky, Canticum sacrum

Rakhmaninov, All-Night Vigil

Mozart, Viola Quintet in G Minor, K.516

Debussy, Sonata for flute, viola & harp
Karl Henning, PhD
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Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Thu May 11, 2006 8:21 am

....and my most recent "crushes":

1. Prokofiev: "Alexander Nevsky" (cantata)

2. Schumann: "Das Paradies und die Peri" (oratorio)

3. Hindemith: Symphony in E-Flat (1940)

4. Bruckner: Symphony No. 1 in c minor

5. Haydn: "The Seasons" (oratorio)

Best regards,
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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