Levine Flops in Beantown

Locked
Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Levine Flops in Beantown

Post by Ralph » Fri Mar 03, 2006 2:33 pm

Boston.com
The Associated Press
Maestro Levine takes fall, cancels news conference

March 2, 2006

The show will go on at Symphony Hall tonight, but without maestro James Levine.

The Boston Symphony Orchestra's music director took a tumble at the end of last night's concert. He was exiting the stage to a standing ovation when he fell. He was able to get back to his feet on his own.

Symphony officials say Levine went to see a doctor today as a "precautionary measure."

Last night's concert featured a pairing of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and Arnold Schoenberg's First Chamber Symphony.

The Boston Symphony Orchestra says tonight's show will go on with assistant conductor Jens Georg Bachmann on the podium.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 18622
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Post by Lance » Fri Mar 03, 2006 3:12 pm

Wow, what a nasty shame for Levine, who I personally think is one of the finest musicians/conductors/pianists alive today. I wonder if the fall has anything to do with other health problems he has endured in the past few years.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Harold Tucker
Posts: 510
Joined: Mon May 19, 2003 4:36 pm
Location: Ludlow, Kentucky

Post by Harold Tucker » Fri Mar 03, 2006 4:07 pm

It probably has more to with being overweight and over fifty. I speak from experience.

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Mar 03, 2006 4:12 pm

Getting back on to your feet from being prone or supine sounds like a normal thing, but when I had my illness I lost a lot of muscle mass and could only do it with the greatest difficulty. Of course, Levine would not have exactly that problem, but I do hope it is a minor thing.

I had an 82-year-old male choir member fall off the stage flat on his back once, and I was sure that was the end. But he got up, dusted himself off, and chided me for being so worried about him.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Post by Ralph » Fri Mar 03, 2006 5:40 pm

Bernstein fell off the podium once, I think in Israel.

Visiting conductors to Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center have their choice of podium and a few select one with a brass railing at the back. For some a very wise choice.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:43 pm

Here's a weird one that I just happen to remember.

Marlene Dietrich fell of the stage in, of all places, Gaithersburg, Maryland a newtown that barely existed at the time.

She broke her leg and, if I remember correctly, never performed again.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

MaestroDJS
Posts: 1713
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 1:15 pm
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States, North America, Earth, Solar System, Milky Way Galaxy, Universe

Post by MaestroDJS » Fri Mar 03, 2006 8:13 pm

jbuck919 wrote:I had an 82-year-old male choir member fall off the stage flat on his back once, and I was sure that was the end. But he got up, dusted himself off, and chided me for being so worried about him.
I've seen that happen too. The victim was more embarrassed than hurt by the fall and didn't want anyone to help. Now I don't know whether to help someone who falls, but I err on the side of helping.

In January 1945 Serge Prokofiev fell and suffered a severe concussion, which nearly killed him. He suffered recurring headaches and periods of dangerously high blood pressure until he died in 1953. One evening in July 1946 Bohuslav Martinu walked off an unlit balcony at the Berkshire Summer Music School, where he briefly taught. It took him a full year to recover from a fractured skull, and during that time he composed while reclining on a board set at a 45° angle. His hearing was also impaired, and he suffered from spells of dizziness.

Otto Klemperer holds the title of most accident-prone major conductor. He was manic-depressive and also had a brain tumor in the late 1930s. This tumor affected a nerve which in turn affected his hearing and balance on his right side. Surgery removed the tumor but did not lessen his infirmities. In 1933 Klemperer suffered a concussion at a rehearsal of the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig and could not conduct the performance. In 1951 Klemperer fell and fractured his left femur at Montréal airport and had to conduct from a chair. In 1958 in London he had an accident which caused 2nd- and 3rd-degree burns over 15% of his body, possibly from smoking his pipe in bed. Rumors that he was hit by a giant meteorite have not been substantiated. Despite his accidents and infirmities, Klemperer lived to be 88 years old, proving that in his case at least, whatever didn't kill him made him stronger.

Library of Congress: Otto Klemperer Archive
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/service/music/ead ... p.0017.pdf

Dave

David Stybr, Engineer and Composer: It's Left Brain vs. Right Brain: best 2 falls out of 3
http://members.SibeliusMusic.com/Stybr
String Quintet No. 2 in B Minor (complete) (20:00)
http://www.SibeliusMusic.com/cgi-bin/sh ... reid=53172
I. Variation-Sonata (5:00); II. Andante cantabile (5:00); III. Intermezzo and Anthem (5:00); IV. Finale: Allegro con brio (5:00)

Personal Assistant and Der Webmeister to author Denise Swanson
http://www.DeniseSwanson.com
Murder of a Smart Cookie
Penguin Putnam ~ Signet, New York, NY

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Fri Mar 03, 2006 8:33 pm

MaestroDJS wrote:
jbuck919 wrote:I had an 82-year-old male choir member fall off the stage flat on his back once, and I was sure that was the end. But he got up, dusted himself off, and chided me for being so worried about him.
I've seen that happen too. The victim was more embarrassed than hurt by the fall and didn't want anyone to help. Now I don't know whether to help someone who falls, but I err on the side of helping.
I made it sound like a small deal, but in fact I was the only one who responded immediately (his wife was offstage, and don't ask why my church choir was onstage in the first place--it's a long story). In spite of his attitude I don't believe that old men don't want young(er) men to be of assistance in what seemed like an extreme circumstance. To this day, I don't know why ten people didn't rush up together. In the end, I knew he loved me for my compassion in spite of his curmudgeounly nature.

He was an excellent baritone who preserved his voice well into old age. Two years later he died of a stroke, and I attended his wake and played gratis for his funeral (along with the entire choir). As we age, let us never forget that the potential for frienship never dies.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

GK
Posts: 467
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 8:04 am
Location: Silver Spring, MD

Post by GK » Sat Mar 04, 2006 12:08 am

When I read the heading I thought that Levine had fallen out of favor with concert goers and critics.

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Post by RebLem » Sat Mar 04, 2006 9:34 am

Charles Alkan died at the age of, I believe, 90, when a bookcase fell over on him.
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

Ralph
Dittersdorf Specialist & CMG NY Host
Posts: 20996
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:54 am
Location: Paradise on Earth, New York, NY

Post by Ralph » Sat Mar 04, 2006 11:23 am

BSO Music Director Sidelined After Fall

The Associated Press
Thursday, March 2, 2006; 6:10 PM

BOSTON -- Boston Symphony Orchestra Music Director James Levine was replaced on the podium for Thursday night's concert after taking a tumble Wednesday as he left the stage.

Symphony officials said Thursday that Levine's doctors told him he didn't break anything.

"A consultation with his doctors, and X-rays, have confirmed that there are no broken bones, although there is the understandable soreness and discomfort that typically result from a fall of this type," said Mark Volpe, BSO managing director.

Levine hopes to return over the weekend, Volpe added.

BSO spokesman Sean Kerrigan said it was not immediately known whether Levine's schedule as music director of the Metropolitan Opera would be affected.

Jens Georg Bachmann, the BSO's assistant conductor, was picked to lead Thursday's concert.
Image

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein

MahlerSnob
Posts: 113
Joined: Thu May 26, 2005 5:31 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Post by MahlerSnob » Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:25 pm

I was at the BSO on Wednesday night and I saw the whole thing. As he was walking off he tripped over something on the stage and fell into the path between the seconds and violas. He got back up almost immediately and seemed to be fine, but I guess he bruised his arm or something like that. Anyway, it's a good week for Jens. If you have to be thrown in to conduct the BSO at the last minute, Beethoven 9 is a great piece to have to do.
Ironically the other BSO assistant, Ludovic Morlot, was flown down to New York this week to fill in for Dohnyani with the Philharmonic. Dohnyani is apparently sick and so Ludo is making his NYP debut on similarly short notice. It's a good week to be a BSO assistant conductor.
-Nathan Lofton
Boston, MA

WWBD - What Would Bach Do?

MaestroDJS
Posts: 1713
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 1:15 pm
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States, North America, Earth, Solar System, Milky Way Galaxy, Universe

Post by MaestroDJS » Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:34 pm

RebLem wrote:Charles Alkan died at the age of, I believe, 90, when a bookcase fell over on him.
According to The Book of Classical Music Lists by Herbert Kupferberg, Charles-Valentin Alkan (1813-1888) was reaching for a copy of the Talmud on a high shelf of Jewish religious books in his Paris home when the entire bookcase fell down and crushed him at age 74. Ernest Chausson (1855-1899) died at age 44 of injuries in a bicycle accident: he lost control of his bicycle and smashed into the wall next to the gate of a country villa he had rented for the summer.

German tenor Fritz Wunderlich (1930-1966) was killed in a fall. Hubert Giesen was his accompanist for many years, and wrote this account in autobiography Am Flügel: Hubert Giesen (an English translation follows):
Etwa drei Wochen nach unserem letzten Gespräch erhielt ich die Nachricht von seinem Tod. Da es bald darauf die irrsinnigsten Gerüchte gab (in Wien behauptete man, er habe sich bei einem russischen Roulette eine Kugel in den Kopf geschossen), will ich kurz auf die näheren Umstände eingehen. Er war zu einem Jagdfreund gefahren, einem reichen Industriellen, dessen Haus in Oberderdingen bei Maulbronn steht. Fritz Wunderlich war nicht nur ein vorzüglicher Porschefahrer, sondern auch ein leidenschaftlicher Jäger. Als sich die Familie und die Gäste am Abend zurückzogen, ging auch Wunderlich in sein Zimmer im Erdgeschoß, verließ es aber bald darauf, um sich aus der Bibliothek im ersten Stock ein Buch zu holen. Wahrscheinlich war er deshalb nochmals in die Schuhe geschlüpft, hatte die Schnürsenkel aber nicht mehr gebunden. Auf dem Rückweg über die Treppe trat er offenbar auf einen Schnürsenkel und stolperte. Um sich zu halten, griff er nach dem Geländer, das aus einem dicken Tau bestand; das Tau riß die Verankerung aus der Wand heraus und der Sänger stürzte kopfüber ein Stockwerk tief auf den mit Steinplatten belegten Boden. Dabei muß er sich gedreht haben und mit dem Hinterkopf zuerst aufgeschlagen sein. Als man ihn fand und ins Heidelberger Krankenhaus brachte, lag er bereits in tiefer Bewußtlosigkeit, aus der er nicht mehr erwachte.
It was about three weeks after our last conversation that I received the news of his death. I want to go into further details because soon after his death there were the most bizarre rumours going round. (In Vienna, it was alleged that he had shot a ball through his head during a game of Russian roulette.) He had gone to visit a hunting friend, a rich industrialist who owned a house in Oberderdingen near Maulbronn. Fritz Wunderlich not only was an excellent Porsche driver but also a passionate hunter. When the family and the other guests retired, Wunderlich also entered his room on the ground floor, but soon left it again in order to get a book from the library on the first floor. It was probably therefore that he had slipped his shoes on again, but had not tightened the laces. When going down the stairs again, he presumably stepped on one of his shoelaces and therefore stumbled. He grabbed at the banister that consisted of a thick rope. The rope pulled out its wall catch and the singer fell headfirst onto the stone floor below. He seems to have turned round as he fell and hit the back of his head on the floor. When he was found and taken into hospital in Heidelberg, he was in a deep coma that he never awoke from.
Incidentally "Am Flügel" literally means "At the Wing" (like Mendelssohn's most famous song "Auf den Flügeln des Gesanges" or "On the Wings of Song"). However in the title of Hubert Giesen's book "Am Flügel" figuratively means "At the Grand Piano" due to the wing-like shape of the concert grand piano.

Dave

David Stybr, Engineer and Composer: It's Left Brain vs. Right Brain: best 2 falls out of 3
http://members.SibeliusMusic.com/Stybr
String Quintet No. 2 in B Minor (complete) (20:00)
http://www.SibeliusMusic.com/cgi-bin/sh ... reid=53172
I. Variation-Sonata (5:00); II. Andante cantabile (5:00); III. Intermezzo and Anthem (5:00); IV. Finale: Allegro con brio (5:00)

Personal Assistant and Der Webmeister to author Denise Swanson
http://www.DeniseSwanson.com
Murder of a Smart Cookie
Penguin Putnam ~ Signet, New York, NY
Last edited by MaestroDJS on Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

pizza
Posts: 5094
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 4:03 am

Post by pizza » Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:44 pm

RebLem wrote:Charles Alkan died at the age of, I believe, 90, when a bookcase fell over on him.
The story of the death of Charles Valentin Alkan (1813 - 1888) as having been caused by a bookcase falling on him when he tried to take a volume of the Talmud from the top shelf is probably apocryphal according to an article by Hugh MacDonald in the Musical Times (Vol. 129, pp. 118-120 - 1988) titled "More on Alkan's Death".

RebLem
Posts: 9117
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:06 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM, USA 87112, 2 blocks west of the Breaking Bad carwash.
Contact:

Post by RebLem » Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:53 pm

GK wrote:When I read the heading I thought that Levine had fallen out of favor with concert goers and critics.
I did, too, GK, but on second thought, it reminds me of an old Second City skit about a wake at which no one could be somber and behave appropriately because the deceased had been at work at a plant which made and canned Van Camps Pork and Beans, and he had drowned in one of the giant vats.

Absolutely the most ridiculous accident I ever heard of, though, was the time Georg Solti was recording Parsifal in London, and he stabbed himself in the left hand with his baton. Had to go to the emergency room. :roll:
Don't drink and drive. You might spill it.--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father
"We're not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term."--Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S. Carolina.
"Racism is America's Original Sin."--Francis Cardinal George, former Roman Catholic Archbishop of Chicago.

jbuck919
Military Band Specialist
Posts: 26867
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Stony Creek, New York

Post by jbuck919 » Sat Mar 04, 2006 2:01 pm

RebLem wrote:
GK wrote:When I read the heading I thought that Levine had fallen out of favor with concert goers and critics.
I did, too, GK, but on second thought, it reminds me of an old Second City skit about a wake at which no one could be somber and behave appropriately because the deceased had been at work at a plant which made and canned Van Camps Pork and Beans, and he had drowned in one of the giant vats.

Absolutely the most ridiculous accident I ever heard of, though, was the time Georg Solti was recording Parsifal in London, and he stabbed himself in the left hand with his baton. Had to go to the emergency room. :roll:
Well, there's Lully.

Why do you think I really don't want to conduct band next year?

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Locked

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 14 guests