I'm new here, but not to classical music. Question! :)

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IcedNote
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I'm new here, but not to classical music. Question! :)

Post by IcedNote » Tue Apr 04, 2006 5:34 pm

Howdy, y'all. I've been a longtime contributor to another music forum (non-classical), and it just occured to me that I should join a forum like this one as well. So hopefully it works out!

Anyways, here's my question.....

I'm just starting my masters of music theory. Harmony is what gets me going in this respect, especially that of the Late-Romantics and Post-Romantics. So my prof and I have decided that I should tackle "Harmonic Function in Chromatic Music", much like Daniel Harrison did. Obviously I'm not going to try and develop my own theory for my masters thesis, but I do want to get my feet wet and such so I can pursue it in my future studies.

So, what I've decided to do is to tackle a couple of specific pieces and deal with them on a very local level. Then, hopefully, I can use those to springboard into a more general theory.

Make sense?

So....what pieces should I choose? :-D

Grazie,

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Tue Apr 04, 2006 5:40 pm

Welcome to the forum, G. I like your sence of humor already. We have a couple composers - Dave Stybr and Karl Henning - and several professional and extremely talented amateur musicians here to help you out. So kick your shoes off and set a spell.
Corlyss
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Ralph
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Post by Ralph » Tue Apr 04, 2006 6:49 pm

And we have folks like me who love music but have no training or educational background in the field. We enjoy each other's cyber-company and learn much.

Welcome!
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IcedNote
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Post by IcedNote » Tue Apr 04, 2006 9:12 pm

Excellent!

I look forward to "getting to know" you guys & gals in the notsodistant future.

8)

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

MahlerSnob
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Post by MahlerSnob » Wed Apr 05, 2006 12:15 am

Welcome to the forum. Where are you doing your MM, if I may ask? I'm a composition/conducting student in Boston at the moment.

My suggestions are probably the typical ones: Tristan, Mahler 9, maybe Verklarte Nacht, Afternoon of a Faun (an interesting piece harmonicaly that I just wrote a paper on last week), etc.
-Nathan Lofton
Boston, MA

WWBD - What Would Bach Do?

Corlyss_D
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Post by Corlyss_D » Wed Apr 05, 2006 12:23 am

MahlerSnob wrote:Welcome to the forum. Where are you doing your MM, if I may ask? I'm a composition/conducting student in Boston at the moment.

My suggestions are probably the typical ones: Tristan, Mahler 9, maybe Verklarte Nacht, Afternoon of a Faun (an interesting piece harmonicaly that I just wrote a paper on last week), etc.
Nathan! :oops: I apologize for omitting you! I'm sure you have mentioned your studies before and it either escaped my attention or I forgot it.
Corlyss
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jbuck919
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Post by jbuck919 » Wed Apr 05, 2006 1:01 am

MahlerSnob wrote:Welcome to the forum. Where are you doing your MM, if I may ask? I'm a composition/conducting student in Boston at the moment.

My suggestions are probably the typical ones: Tristan, Mahler 9, maybe Verklarte Nacht, Afternoon of a Faun (an interesting piece harmonicaly that I just wrote a paper on last week), etc.
I would have pretty much made the same suggetions.

There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Wed Apr 05, 2006 5:57 am

Welcome to our site! I hope you enjoy it---and feel free to contribute a lot.

I'm going to make a suggestion for you that most people might not think of, but an excellent example of post-Romantic Era (original) harmony:

Carl Nielsen: Symphony No. 5, opus 50

I make no bones about the fact that I personally prefer Nielsen to his more popular and slicker contemporary, Jean Sibelius.

Good luck with your MM!

Best regards,
Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

IcedNote
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Post by IcedNote » Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:20 am

MahlerSnob wrote:Welcome to the forum. Where are you doing your MM, if I may ask? I'm a composition/conducting student in Boston at the moment.

My suggestions are probably the typical ones: Tristan, Mahler 9, maybe Verklarte Nacht, Afternoon of a Faun (an interesting piece harmonicaly that I just wrote a paper on last week), etc.
Good suggestions! I'll probably stay away from Debussy, but I was definitely thinking of Mahler. I'm not a big fan of Dickie W....opera = :cry:

I was also considering Bruchner and Strauss....those guys rock(ed)! Can't decide on a piece though.... :(

Did my undergrad in composition at UMichigan and now am down at UMiami. Just got one MM in electronic music composition and now working on the other in music theory.

What school in Boston? Our new prof here, Lansing McLoskey, was at Harvard and Wellesley for a while. Great guy and brilliant teacher.

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

IcedNote
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Post by IcedNote » Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:25 am

Jack Kelso wrote:Welcome to our site! I hope you enjoy it---and feel free to contribute a lot.

I'm going to make a suggestion for you that most people might not think of, but an excellent example of post-Romantic Era (original) harmony:

Carl Nielsen: Symphony No. 5, opus 50

I make no bones about the fact that I personally prefer Nielsen to his more popular and slicker contemporary, Jean Sibelius.

Good luck with your MM!

Best regards,
Jack
You're right....I wouldn't have come up with Nielsen unless I had looked at a giant list! As sad as it is, I'm not all too familiar with his music, but hey, that might be a good reason to look into him.

Sibelius has his moments, but I find most of his works to be Zzzzzzzzzzzz.

Ah, and since I'm new here, it might help to list my favorites so you get some idea.

Beethoven, Debussy, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Liszt.

Yup.....piano player here :P

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:35 am

IcedNote wrote:Ah, and since I'm new here, it might help to list my favorites so you get some idea.

Beethoven, Debussy, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Liszt.

Yup.....piano player here :P

-G
Schumann's mine....have you gotten into his things yet? He's not for everyone, though.

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

IcedNote
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Post by IcedNote » Wed Apr 05, 2006 9:31 am

Jack Kelso wrote:
IcedNote wrote:Ah, and since I'm new here, it might help to list my favorites so you get some idea.

Beethoven, Debussy, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Liszt.

Yup.....piano player here :P

-G
Schumann's mine....have you gotten into his things yet? He's not for everyone, though.

Jack
Of course! How can you argue against his Fantasia in C? 8)

-G
Harakiried composer reincarnated as a nonprofit development guy.

MahlerSnob
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Post by MahlerSnob » Wed Apr 05, 2006 11:57 pm

Good suggestions! I'll probably stay away from Debussy, but I was definitely thinking of Mahler. I'm not a big fan of Dickie W....opera =
Wagner's where all of that came from though. I strongly recommend looking at, if nothing else, the Prelude to Tristan. There's enough harmonic ambiguity in that opening to fuel any number of graduate papers.
I was also considering Bruchner and Strauss....those guys rock(ed)! Can't decide on a piece though....
I suppose. They've always seemed a bit more tame to me, though. Possiblys some of Strauss's later music - Metamorphosen, Rosenkavalier, Elektra, etc. Then again you said you're not much of an opera person.
Did my undergrad in composition at UMichigan and now am down at UMiami. Just got one MM in electronic music composition and now working on the other in music theory.

What school in Boston? Our new prof here, Lansing McLoskey, was at Harvard and Wellesley for a while. Great guy and brilliant teacher.
Very cool. I'm at NEC studying with Michael Gandolfi. Those are both great schools, from what I hear. I have a few friends at Michigan but they probably started after you left if you're on to your second MM now. Good to see another academic type on the boards.
-Nathan Lofton
Boston, MA

WWBD - What Would Bach Do?

Jack Kelso
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Post by Jack Kelso » Thu Apr 06, 2006 12:31 am

MahlerSnob wrote:Wagner's where all of that came from though. I strongly recommend looking at, if nothing else, the Prelude to Tristan. There's enough harmonic ambiguity in that opening to fuel any number of graduate papers.
Actually, Debussy came more from *Schumann than Wagner, against whom Impressionism reacted. Dvorâk (as well as much Mahler) also are heavily indebted to Schumann's influence. Heinz Holliger, composer, conductor and oboist, feels Schumann was the real revolutionary of the 19th century. Even the "Tristan" chord is to be found in Schumann's Fourth Symphony (1841).....

But "Tristan und Isolde" is STILL a perennial favorite and offers graduate students plenty to write and rave about.

Jack

_______
*One example is "Prophet Bird" from "Waldszenen", op. 82
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

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