Informations about sinfonietta

Locked
danielsen

Informations about sinfonietta

Post by danielsen » Tue May 09, 2006 8:00 am

Somebody knows where I could find informations or an essay about sinonietta as as musical form/genre? I need it for my degree as I finish Music Academy in Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Re: Informations about sinfonietta

Post by Corlyss_D » Tue May 09, 2006 1:04 pm

danielsen wrote:Somebody knows where I could find informations or an essay about sinonietta as as musical form/genre? I need it for my degree as I finish Music Academy in Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
Welcome to the board, D. I'm afraid you were misled by the title of the thread in which you posted your question. Concerned that it would not get the attention you wanted, I have split it out with your title.

Among English speaking folks, the term is sinfonietta, although sinonietta seems to be a continental term in common use that means the same thing, esp. when referring to performing groups. There's about 3 inches devoted to it in Groves. The word appears to be a phoney Italian word, the genre pretty limited to the 20th Century, referring to a piece about 10-30 minutes long containing "movements of a popular, nationalistic or pictorial character. The essence of the term is to disclaim the depth and importance of a fully-fledged symphony." Aside from a list of compositions with that name, and a reference to K. Pahlen's book Sinfonie der Welt, that's about all the info there is in Groves.
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

PJME
Posts: 780
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:37 am

Many were written...

Post by PJME » Tue May 09, 2006 2:28 pm

Symphoniettas ("small symphonies") were written from the late 19th century.Some small orchestras call themselves "Symphonietta"
Corlyss told you the rest. Try to find books on music in your local library....Cluj Napoca has a good orchestra - maybe you could speak to a musician!?
http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/ ... pe2003.htm
Sinfonietta/Sinfoniettas : for simfonietta, simphonietta, symfoniieta, symphonietta, symphoniette. LCNAF n96-37352
I have never heard of the term "sinonietta",however....American composer Morton Gould uses a term of his own invention: Symphonette.

Here are a few interesting ones :
N. Rimsky Korsakoff :Sinfonietta on Russian themes
Francis Poulenc: Symphonietta - a lovely work - especially the slow movement is ravishing.
Albert Roussel : Symphoniette for stringorchestra (composed for the women-only orchestra of Jane Evrard.)
Most sinfoniettas are scored for small ensembles. Czech composer Leos Janacek however uses a very large orchestra in his Sinfonietta from 1926(with extra brass instruments in the opening and closing fanfare-like movements).A splendid work.
Bohuslav Martinu : Sinfonietta giocosa and Sinfonietta "La Jolla". Very lovely music with a sad Slav undertone...
All of these works have been performed and recorded many times. I hope you have a place were you can rent CD's. At the Naxos site (but also at Amazon, Tower,CD Universe etc) you can listen to short fragments - for free.

karlhenning
Composer-in-Residence
Posts: 9790
Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:12 am
Location: Boston, MA
Contact:

Re: Many were written...

Post by karlhenning » Tue May 09, 2006 3:17 pm

PJME wrote:Here are a few interesting ones :
N. Rimsky Korsakoff :Sinfonietta on Russian themes
Francis Poulenc: Symphonietta - a lovely work - especially the slow movement is ravishing.
Albert Roussel : Symphoniette for stringorchestra (composed for the women-only orchestra of Jane Evrard.)
Most sinfoniettas are scored for small ensembles. Czech composer Leos Janacek however uses a very large orchestra in his Sinfonietta from 1926(with extra brass instruments in the opening and closing fanfare-like movements).A splendid work.
Bohuslav Martinu : Sinfonietta giocosa and Sinfonietta "La Jolla". Very lovely music with a sad Slav undertone...
I can't believe you missed the Prokofiev Opus 5/48!!!

Cheers,
~Karl
Karl Henning, PhD
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston, Massachusetts
http://members.tripod.com/~Karl_P_Henning/
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
Published by Lux Nova Press
http://www.luxnova.com/

PJME
Posts: 780
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:37 am

Nobody is perfect!

Post by PJME » Tue May 09, 2006 4:29 pm

Karl, nobody is perfect ... the Prokofiev Sinfonietta is not in my collection! But then,I'm not into completeness for completeness sake....I'm sure there are many,many sinfoniettas to be discovered...Let's start in Romania! - with that orchestra from Cluj Napoca.... and music by Zeno Vancea, Paul Constantinescu, Tiberiu Olah, Myriam Marbé ...

Jack Kelso
Posts: 3004
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2005 11:52 pm
Location: Mannheim, Germany

Post by Jack Kelso » Wed May 10, 2006 12:09 am

...and then there is a very delightful sinfonietta by Joseph Joachim Raff, whose compositions are coming more and more to radio and CDs.

Jack
"Schumann's our music-maker now." ---Robert Browning

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 16916
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Post by Lance » Wed May 10, 2006 12:54 am

Let me just throw in my two cents worth. Actually I see "sinfonietta" as being, as Lyssie mentioned, covering two things:

1) Sinfonietta - a smallish symphony rather than being a full-fledged work. Janacek wrote a Sinfonietta, as did Poulenc, and Alexandre Tansman and George Chadwick. Even Rimsky-Korsakov wrote a Sinfonietta.

2) A smaller orchestra in comparison to a full-fledged one. Examples: London Sinfonietta, University of Illinois Sinfonietta, the RTE Sinfoinetta, the Fiedler Sinfonietta, the New Sinfonietta of Amsterdam, and the Rome Sinfonietta, just to name a few. I'm sure there are countless others.

If I wanted to start a new chamber-type orchestra here, and since we already have a Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra (formerly Binghamton Symphony Orchestra), I might call it the Binghamton Sinfonietta, and if I wanted to be somewhat corny, I might even call it the Binghamton Symphonette to distinguish it from the big orchestra.

I hope this helps explain in as simple terms as possible.
Last edited by Lance on Wed May 10, 2006 1:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Corlyss_D
Site Administrator
Posts: 27663
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 2:25 am
Location: The Great State of Utah
Contact:

Post by Corlyss_D » Wed May 10, 2006 1:04 pm

:shock: When did the BSO become the BPO?
Corlyss
Contessa d'EM, a carbon-based life form

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 16916
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Post by Lance » Wed May 10, 2006 1:10 pm

Corlyss_D wrote::shock: When did the BSO become the BPO?
Oh - several years ago! It changed when the Binghamton Symphony merged with the Binghamton "Pops." It's got to be 4-6 years I would think.
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

danielsen

Thanks

Post by danielsen » Thu May 11, 2006 5:30 am

Thanks everybody for informations and references to simfonietta, especially to PJME. He indeed mentioned some of the Romanian composers (such as Zeno Vancea, Paul Constantinescu, few others) that I used in my work for degree. Unfortunatelly there are only a few references to Simfonietta in the world music creation that I need to write in my introductory pages. The New Grove Dictionary offers limited information about it, that is why I have to pick out several books. Thanks again.

Lance
Site Administrator
Posts: 16916
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:27 am
Location: Binghamton, New York
Contact:

Re: Thanks

Post by Lance » Thu May 11, 2006 11:19 am

danielsen wrote:Thanks everybody for informations and references to simfonietta, especially to PJME. He indeed mentioned some of the Romanian composers (such as Zeno Vancea, Paul Constantinescu, few others) that I used in my work for degree. Unfortunatelly there are only a few references to Simfonietta in the world music creation that I need to write in my introductory pages. The New Grove Dictionary offers limited information about it, that is why I have to pick out several books. Thanks again.
Well, we're happy that we could be of some help. Good luck with your paper!
Lance G. Hill
Editor-in-Chief
______________________________________________________

When she started to play, Mr. Steinway came down and personally
rubbed his name off the piano. [Speaking about pianist &*$#@+#]

Image

Locked

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest